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Is there any thing like Kelley Blue Book for card, but for guns? I've been looking for a P229 Legion and trying to weigh the benefits/drawbacks of getting a used one.


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I believe the market sets prices and the best place to see the market is gunbroker.com. You can do a search by gun and filter for used only and see what they're selling for. Compare that with new prices at gunwatcher.com and see if there's enough difference to go used.
 

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"Blue Book of Gun Values" by S.P. Fjestad

I will caution you to not depend upon it. Many say it is the book pawn shops and wholesale buyer use to show a seller and never share with a buyer.

Most people thing that if you find a gun in the condition stated in this book and get it for the price quoted in the book, you have gotten a very good deal.

There are some other good reasons for acquiring other than gun values. It does discuss and provides a few pictures of firearms with condition ratings. Rating conditions of firearms varies from a % factor such as a 90% gun is worth this and a 60% example is worth this many dollars. Other systems uses narrative ratings such as As New in the Box, Excellent, Very Good, Good, Fair and Poor. This book uses the % method.

There are many other things discussed in the book other than gun values. I have a couple of older additions I use for research. I did not find the book beneficial, even when new, for buying or negotiation purposes.

I agree that past selling prices on GunBroker is an accurate assessment. Make sure you look at only firearms that did sell and met the reserve.
 

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When I am interested in a particular car or am
Selling one myself I rely on eBay motors to value the car. In the same sense I rely on gunbroker to value guns.

Merely relying on Kelley blue book to value a car is, in my mind the wrong way to purchase a car. It is driven more so by the current market.
Guns are the same.
There are too many variables aside from condition of a gun to consider when valuing it, mainly the supply and demand and more importantly, desirability.
 

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Gunbroker is good and I often do a scan of WikiArms and AmmoSeek to see what some of the best prices are. I also check out Armslist to see what the face to face gun values are for most of the common stuff that gets traded a lot.
 

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As others say, Gunbroker, not the asking, search the completed auctions.

If buying a P229, consider skipping the Legion. Not meaning to ruffle feathers, but you can get a better quality older P229 (police turn in, or even a non-ex LEO gun that has a lower price because of all the LEO turn ins).

A nice ex-LEO P229 40 DA/SA is going from $400 to $600, depending on condition. About half the price of a Legion. It can be converted to .357 SIG or 9mm. Even with new night sight and conversion barrel you will be money ahead and have an arguably better made gun. No, it won't have the bling and under trigger guard finger relief cut, but it will also have a more durable finish than a Legion. This one(I have several), is a 1999 and cost me all of $449 shipped, it's was in nearly new condition.

I've done a few mods to it - okay, a few more than a few to give it an action and trigger that is an easy rival to my WC 10mm 1911 w/2.5 lb trigger (this P229 is at 3 lbs and as creepless and crisp as the high price spread) I wouldn't trade it for a new Legion . . . heck, (and I'm not just sayin' to try and make a point or be flippant), I wouldn't trade it for two new Legions - clearly, it's not about the money, I've "bonded" with the gun, it's my trusted, mostly daily carry.

 

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As others say, Gunbroker, not the asking, search the completed auctions.

If buying a P229, consider skipping the Legion. Not meaning to ruffle feathers, but you can get a better quality older P229 (police turn in, or even a non-ex LEO gun that has a lower price because of all the LEO turn ins).

A nice ex-LEO P229 40 DA/SA is going from $400 to $600, depending on condition. About half the price of a Legion. It can be converted to .357 SIG or 9mm. Even with new night sight and conversion barrel you will be money ahead and have an arguably better made gun. No, it won't have the bling and under trigger guard finger relief cut, but it will also have a more durable finish than a Legion. This one(I have several), is a 1999 and cost me all of $449 shipped, it's was in nearly new condition.

I've done a few mods to it - okay, a few more than a few to give it an action and trigger that is an easy rival to my WC 10mm 1911 w/2.5 lb trigger (this P229 is at 3 lbs and as creepless and crisp as the high price spread) I wouldn't trade it for a new Legion . . . heck, (and I'm not just sayin' to try and make a point or be flippant), I wouldn't trade it for two new Legions - clearly, it's not about the money, I've "bonded" with the gun, it's my trusted, mostly daily carry.

why do you have the crimson trace on it??
 

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why do you have the crimson trace on it??
Good question, Bear!

I have a CT on my first ever SIG, a railed gun I use now for HD only:



I have big hands, and though I don't think the CT's add to the esthetic appeal, they fit my hand well. These are the older version with a button on each side - I've disabled the strong side button and with OWB carry, my sports car and airplane seat belt buckle would drain the battery in short order. I disabled the button by injecting epoxy into the side of the button from the outside of the grip - fixed that! To the crux of the question:

1) I think an active laser useful in the low light and potential unusual shooting positions that might be required in HD situations.

2) The laser activation button, due to my shooting hand and grip, comes directly under my middle finger. I can turn it on and off without affecting shooting grip or aim. This makes it useful for "checking" dry fire point shooting. It works well for dry fire trigger control practice too.

3) The Trijicon HD (much like SIG's X-Ray sights), makes for natural "front sight focus" as the dot is so prominent. The laser is secondary, but does provide redundancy and, at least for now and excepting the appeal for target shooting, obviates the need for a slide mount red dot reflex sight (they are cool, I have an extra slide and a milling machine! But the extra carry inconvenience is holding me back :confused: )

4) CT's design is unobtrusive as can be. It doesn't get in the way. I bought it on the cheap, used but in new condition, on a forum classified for something like $125 - that appealed to the parsimonious side of me (I sweat the small change for semi-frivolous spending, while spending large bucks from things I consider investments without batting an eye. I like CT grips, though wish they had the models I use in green.
 
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