SIG Talk banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been rebuilding 1911s for years and recently had an issue I'd never seen before. This post is offered as a cautionary tale for those of you who like to tinker...
On many of my builds, I use a DLASK magnesium trigger with titanium bows, if the owner will spring for it. The raw trigger is expensive but expertly machined and comes in several sizes. For my personal guns, I use the long. The triggers are supplied "oversized" so they can be cut to fit the pistol exactly. For me, this is about a four hour process (OK, I'm slow) but the results are typically outstanding. Fast forward to yesterday and I'm test firing a Sig 1911 re-build. After shooting 25 rounds, it goes into the ultrasonic cleaner for a thorough cleaning; last in line for the 7 guns I used. I forgot about this one overnight and this morning...disaster. The solution of one capful of Simple Green to a liter of tap water and five minutes in the spa ate this trigger overnight. As you can see, the trigger is destroyed. So, fair warning! The first pic is how it's supposed to look.
The rest are a tragedy.
Trigger Air gun Grey Gun barrel Wood
Helmet Auto part Silver Font Metal

Helmet Font Metal Fashion accessory Rim

Grey Wood Font Metal Macro photography
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It may be the magnesium (didn't happen to aluminum) but it scared the **** out me since I put my AL framed pistols in there too. I flunked HS science so I don't know anything about the metal or chemistry stuff. I won't be experimenting with Simple Green though.
 

·
🎖USA Veteran Premium Member
Joined
·
866 Posts
The solution of one capful of Simple Green
Some of us WoodWorkers were experiencing carbide and tooth brazing failures on carbide tipped tooling... (bits. blades etc)...
the common denominator was that we were all using regular SG...Some of us went w/ full strength while others diluted but it didn't seem to matter...
Another disaster was using oven cleaner because of it's Sodium Hydroxide...
this is a reply from Simple Green C/S from a ways back...

Dear Mr. XXXX:

Thank you for contacting Simple Green and for your interest in our products.

Simple Green All Purpose Cleaner should not be used to soak saw blades for any period of time. Any application other than spray and wipe is not recommended.
Long term exposure like this can possibly cause cobalt leaching that will, in turn, affect the integrity of the brazing or carbide.

The recommended product for cleaning saw blades is Simple Green Pro HD which has no effect even during long soak times. Simple Green Pro HD can be purchased at Home Depot.

I hope that this information helps. If you have further questions about this or other Simple Green products or uses, please feel free to contact me via reply email or directly. My contact information is provided below and my regular business hours are Mon thru Fri from 8 -5 Pacific Standard Time.

Thank you again for your inquiry.

Sincerely,

XXXXXXXXXXXX

Technical and Customer Liaison

Note...
at one time they were recommending their Aviation formula...
Since SG leaches cobalt from the base metal, you run an increasing risk of microfractures. ....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,728 Posts
Original Simple Green was determined to be corrosive to aluminum by the USAF some 25 years ago. Civilians aircraft, where the aluminum is often overlapped, were subject to this problem also. Simple Green then came out with an "aluminum safe" version that is okay to use on aluminum and is often used on aircraft . . . it's probably okay, though I'm not sure about magnesium, which is more susceptible to galvanic corrosion that occurs when it is in contact to a more noble metal in the presence of an electrolyte.
 

·
🎖USA Veteran Premium Member
Joined
·
866 Posts
Original Simple Green was determined to be corrosive to aluminum by the USAF some 25 years ago. Civilians aircraft, where the aluminum is often overlapped, were subject to this problem also. Simple Green then came out with an "aluminum safe" version that is okay to use on aluminum and is often used on aircraft . . . it's probably okay, though I'm not sure about magnesium, which is more susceptible to galvanic corrosion that occurs when it is in contact to a more noble metal in the presence of an electrolyte.
the best bet would be not to use any of SG cleaners till there's an official word on it's compatibility w/ magnesium.....
I did email their C/S about the compatibility of their cleaners and magnesium...
I need to know...
till then I'll stick w/ Dawn or Trend in the sonic cleaner..
 
  • Like
Reactions: 34SF

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Original Simple Green was determined to be corrosive to aluminum by the USAF some 25 years ago. Civilians aircraft, where the aluminum is often overlapped, were subject to this problem also. Simple Green then came out with an "aluminum safe" version that is okay to use on aluminum and is often used on aircraft . . . it's probably okay, though I'm not sure about magnesium, which is more susceptible to galvanic corrosion that occurs when it is in contact to a more noble metal in the presence of an electrolyte.
Simple Green was excluded on the maintenance consumable list on MTA when I worked for a train builder. I didn't ask why but I thought Simple Green was mild. Now I know why.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
91 Posts
--snip--
this is a reply from Simple Green C/S from a ways back...
--snip--
Simple Green All Purpose Cleaner should not be used to soak saw blades for any period of time. Any application other than spray and wipe is not recommended.
Long term exposure like this can possibly cause cobalt leaching that will, in turn, affect the integrity of the brazing or carbide.

--snip--
Original Simple Green was determined to be corrosive to aluminum by the USAF some 25 years ago. Civilians aircraft, where the aluminum is often overlapped, were subject to this problem also.
--snip--
This seems like pretty important information. I certainly don't want to permanently damage any piece of a $1200 gun, but especially the frame which can't be easily fixed.

I owned an aircraft for 15 years. I never heard anyone even casually mention "don't use Simple Green" when washing it. I actually bought aviation specific (super expensive) washes, but if I were someplace where I was washing my plane and all I had was Simple Green, I would have used it.

I feel like I dodged a bullet, like I just opened my hood for no particular reason and discovered a gas leak directly onto the exhaust manifold as the fuel line falls apart in my hands.

Iife is dangerous...nobody gets out alive.
 

·
🎖USA Veteran Premium Member
Joined
·
866 Posts
heard back from SG...
the skinny is - DO NOT SOAK for more than a few minutes...

Hello Marty,

When cleaning metal pieces or surfaces, especially when in an ultrasonic cleaner or parts washer, we recommend using either our Simple Green Pro HD (Simple Green Household Cleaning Products Line) or our Extreme Simple Green Aircraft & Precision Cleaner (Simple Green | Industrial | Extreme Aircraft Precision Cleaner). Both are formulated with a corrosion inhibitor to help protect metal surfaces while cleaning, though contact time should be incidental or limited to a few minutes. Both are similarly formulated, though Pro HD is available through retailers such as The Home Depot or Lowe’s whereas Extreme is found mostly through distributors such as Fastenal or Grainger. Both cleaners/degreasers have a decomposition/breakdown temperature of 109 degrees Fahrenheit. Once this temperature is exceeded, the formula begins to break down and lose cleaning efficacy. Temperatures approaching the boiling point of water should be avoided as it could cause the cleaner to evaporate and potentially cause some ingredients to burn onto the surface, though we don’t have data for that as this is not an intended use case for our cleaners. As for recommended dilutions, we recommend dilutions between 1:3 to 1:13. A 1:13 dilution is about 7.1% of cleaner to water. This is the suggested minimum so there is enough corrosion inhibitor in the use-solution when cleaning metal pieces. Tap water should be suitable enough to use unless the water quality is extremely poor or contaminated. Some customers have used deionized or distilled water, which is suitable to use.

Sincerely,

Jason Park
Technical Service

plan "B"...
use “Scrub-Free” bathroom cleaner.
Spray or dip the parts in a tank filled with the stuff, use a toothbrush (NOT a metal wire brush!!!) for very heavy white deposits.
Wait about 30 seconds and rinse in very hot water.

plan "C"...
TSP....
Dry with compressed air.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
heard back from SG...
the skinny is - DO NOT SOAK for more than a few minutes...
Nice work Stick. I dumped all my SG yesterday and am trying the dawn dish soap method for now. I did two pistols this morning and they came out fine; same amount of scrubbing, so no loss from ditching SG. Never heard of the "scrub free bathroom cleaner" trick but I have an M1A that's a prime candidate for this if it doesn't hurt plastics.

Thanks for the facts!
 

·
🎖USA Veteran Premium Member
Joined
·
866 Posts
thanks...
but I was being selfish,,, I needed to know for me...

Never heard of the "scrub free bathroom cleaner" trick
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top