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Has anyone used an ultrasonic cleaner on Sig aluminum frames? Was there any damage done?
Thanks
 

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I haven't. I have a couple of them, one is several gallons and would do the deed. I've never tried though - and won't.

Most solutions used are water based, and unless completely detail stripping the gun, I'd be concerned about corrosion. And if detail stripping, SIG's are easy enough to hand clean. Then there's the concern about possible damage to Tritium sights, however unlikely that may be.

When I have small parts to clean, like the injectors on an airplane engine, I'll often cut an aluminum can in half, then fill that with Hoppe's, then sit the can in the ultrasonic cleaner with the appropriate level of plain water. The water and thin aluminum transfers the energy into the solvent.
 

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After how many rounds would one recommend a full breakdown and ultrasonic cleaning? I do the basic field stripping and cleaning after each session but I'm sure over time more will need to be done. I'm newbie, so any advice is appreciated.
 

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A local LGS uses ultrasonic cleaning on every used handgun that he puts up for sale. It doesn't harm the SIG frames and removes every bit of lubricant. I'm not sure what chemicals he uses, but it provides some kind of dry rust prevention. I always have to completely re-lube everything I get from him.
 

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I agree with bumper. We have discussed this numerous times in the past. You may want to search and read the past discussions.

I tried it years ago on one steel pistol totally disassembled. It was a bigger pain than a remedy.

The test to see if an ultrasonic unit is working well is to place a small square maybe 4X4 in your unit and run it for a couple of minutes. If it comes out perforated by hundreds of small holes then the unit is working properly. Don't know what it would do to an aluminum parts. You use different solutions for cleaning and for rinsing based upon the materials to be cleaned. In other words there are different solutions for clock parts, watch parts, jewelry, gun parts and the list goes on and on. I use a different solution for my Wife's jewelry than I use for clock work and a different solution for cleaning brass for reloading. This gives you an idea of what "bumper" was referring to when cleaning firearms with night sights.

Here is a good link to study on firearms by L&R: L&R Ultrasonic Cleaning and Lubricating Systems

I have an L&R unit, and it is a quality ultrasonic. You will also need tools for drying parts after cleaning and also after the rinse/lubrication cycle. I use a hair dryer for antique clock parts. Also with clock parts, you totally disassemble the movement, gears, springs and plates, to clean. I have read where armories or firearm repair facilities using ultrasonic normally use an air compressor for the drying cycles.

Some of the above is my personal opinion and others' thoughts/opinions may differ.

Addition: I just read "winterwar's" post. Many rinse solutions come with a mild lubricant which assist in protecting surfaces of items. It is not a lubricant between moving parts. They have to be lubricated with the proper lubricants like gun oil and gun grease for sliding parts. On jewelry and reloading brass, I use hot water as the rinse and dry, as stated above, with a hair drier. There are no moving parts with these items and no reason for surface protection.
 

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I use an L&R that I've had for over 20 years, but only use it on a few selected things, like an AR bolt.

L&R (and others) make a lubricating solution as well as a cleaning solution. It's a dry lube as winterwar mentions.



Safety Ultrasonic Weapon Lubricating Solution

Product code: 212



Blended and ready-to-use. Conditions and lubricates firearms after cleaning. All traces of water are displaced, leaving the firearm with a uniform, dry lubrication. In a matter of minutes, your weapon looks and feels "factory new." Economical.
 

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To dry empty brass after wet cleaning, you can use the wife's clothes dryer . . . once.
My wife puts the rack in place for me and leaves the door open. Blessed am I.

She will also sort head stamps and check brass after they have been dried with me.
 

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For me, I'll do the slide, barrel, rod, magazines and springs, but not the frames.

I haven't had any issue with my Tritium sights on my SIG's or XS Big Dots.

Polymer?, yes.

I use mine mostly for gun parts and reloading dies and on some of my dies, the black finish was removed from the decapping stem so I only do the bodies of the dies now and use a rag with CLP for the stems.

YMMV of course but it isn't worth risking the finish for me.
 

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What do you guys do with the used cleaning solution?
Follow the instructions on the label, which seem to usually be "just put it down the sink or toilet" since it's around 95% water.

The lubricating solution can be reused indefinitely as it's only used on clean parts. If by chance you get some sludge, just run it through a coffee filter or cheesecloth to remove the sludge.
 

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I use a solution by Lyman. I find ultra sonic cleaning to be a great way to clean a really dirty gun. I had a block that I didn't clean until about 6000 rounds. I had to dip it twice lol.
 

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What do you guys do with the used cleaning solution?
I use Hornady Lock n' Load Sonic Cleaner Solution. I have used it on aluminum frames and guns of different finish (stainless, nitron, pvd). The solution states its safe for all finishes and so far I havent had any problems
 
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