SIG Talk banner

whats my problem

  • trigger control

    Votes: 10 27.0%
  • need more live fire

    Votes: 12 32.4%
  • developed a flinch

    Votes: 5 13.5%
  • i just suck :)

    Votes: 10 27.0%
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok so I am a little rusty in the shooting department (its been about 3 months!:eek:)
so I went to the range today with my new project (did a retro build on a 3rd gen smith auto) and for some reason I could do really well in double action but I was pulling all my single action shots low and left. I could light off the double action as fast as I wanted and hit exactly where I was aiming but I really had to slow down on my single action to get it even close to where my first shot landed (I'm talking really bad groups...like 4in at 10yrds bad) now I am not a competitive shooter nor have I ever had any formal training yet but I did get a trip to the sig academy and all four pistol courses for Christmas planned for this summer so I'm excited about that. I have been shooting for about 4 years though and I have done fairly well. striker fired, dao, dak, and other da/sa's have yielded good results and I have not had any worries before. I don't believe its the gun but I could be wrong. maybe I have not connected with it yet? I mean I'm only 500 rounds since the build has been complete but I didn't shoot it before the build due to it being in pretty rough shape. anyways long butt around the elbow explanation concluded...why can I shoot well in double action and get nice groups at 10 yrds but when I fire single action I pull low and left or just straight left if I slow it down. and this is if I start in single action too so I don't think its the transition. it usually starts to get bad about the third or fourth shot into a string. have I developed a flinch, am I just anticipating the shot? I do not claim to be an amazing or comp shooter so please let me know. I would just like some advice on how to fix it and things I can do at home to help prevent this again (I don't really get much time to get to the range to live fire. maybe every couple months, but when I do go I usually put between 200 and 500 rounds downrange) thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,693 Posts
Sounds like you may be anticipating the recoil. If that’s the case the DA mode is giving you a better sense of the trigger brake but SA mode may not be. More dry fire practice in SA should help solve the issue. What are you shooting? A 4506?
 

·
🎖USN Retired
Joined
·
3,862 Posts
You’re squeezing the trigger as hard in SA as it is in DA and at the same time you’re weak hand grip is not gripping as strong as it should be. Hence the shots are being pulled down to the left. Plus, you’re probably riding the trigger reset too. Pull, let reset, pull. You’re strong hand should be more relaxed(but still gripping) to allow more dexterity of your trigger finger while making sure your weak hand is gripping the bejesus out of the grip.

Do lots of dry fire on your free time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,429 Posts
I had the same results, when I started shooting handguns.....most hits were low, left area....

Somebody coached me to "squeeze" the trigger, at the break point....I was "pulling" trigger straight back.......causing my aim to shift...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,487 Posts
The simple test for recoil anticipation and flinching:

With a revolver, load cylinder with one or two empty case along with live rounds, look aside while rotating cylinder and closing. Commence shooting, if you are flinching there will typically be a pronounced push forward at the misfire.

To do the same with a semi-auto you will need some snap caps or reloaded blanks (bullet pressed into case with no powder or primer). Mix "blanks" with live rounds and load mag while looking away so you won't know what order they are in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the responses. Yeah I guess I am kind of slapping the trigger. I was so focused on making a smooth double action trigger pull, doing the whole quarter trick on the front top of the slide and making it smooth and consistent I guess I thought the single action would come naturally. I really appreciate the words of wisdom guys...I will also observe my grip and see if I'm squeezing too tight with my firing hand and not tight enough with the support hand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sounds like you may be anticipating the recoil. If that’s the case the DA mode is giving you a better sense of the trigger brake but SA mode may not be. More dry fire practice in SA should help solve the issue. What are you shooting? A 4506?
no its a 915 built in 93'. i did a retro build on it. it has Trijicon night sights, front cocking serrations, Farrar mono grips, lightened main spring and trigger bar spring, stronger recoil spring, and all springs in the gun were replaced (all springs were from Wolff), new Mec-Gar 17 round flush fit mags (x3) frame melted all rough edges, Cerakoted in gunmetal gray with all controls and trigger Cerakoted black, action polish of sear, hammer, trigger draw bar, feed ramp and upper chamber hood, slide rails, and other wear parts (guide rod, safety barrel and detent, etc...) also the top of the hammer spur is polished but the rest of the hammer is Cerakoted black. its kind of a cool build i enjoy shooting it quite a bit...it is a very soft shooter and has a very smooth action and slide...idk why i am having a problem with this particular gun compared to much inferior guns (by inferior i mean less attention to detail/stock)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,506 Posts
right off the bat i would say it sounds like anticipation.
for the ideal double-action, the action should be so smooth, the release is a "surprise"
(at least that is how i think about it). steady pull until it breaks.

with single action, you know where that break is, and that can lead to anticipation.

if you have a friend that can watch, or can video, that is best for this.

have your friend load your magazine with 5 rounds, but have him put in a snap cap in somewhere between rounds 2-4 (and not tell you).
now rack it and while he or the camera is watching, fire all shots single action.
when you hit that snap cap, you might see that anticipation if the gun dips when you pull the trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
I know this is kinda an old thread but wanted to add my 2 cents. Recently took a couple of classes with JJ Racaza and the first 4 hours was dedicated to trigger control. JJ pushes the reset and prep of the trigger. We spent a good 10 minutes manipulating the trigger (empty weapon) to see how many walls we could find. I was shooting my Glock 19 this day and was able to find 4 walls prior to the "shot" breaking. The improvements across the board were noticeable. Once we could quickly reset and prep the trigger our grouping tightened up significantly. Check out some of his videos, this method really improved my shooting.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,330 Posts
Not a choice in you poll, but I will chime in with it none the less. Dry fire practice. 5 to 10 minutes every day. Will do more for you than 100's of rounds of live fire.

I stress the 5 to 10 minutes every day. Not an hour or two, once a week. Short periods of dry fire practice every day will do wonders for you. Try it for three weeks and report back. Betcha gonna b happy!!
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top