SIG Talk banner

Technology; The Dangers of Complacency

728 10
I've seen a few posts recently asking about damaged or faulty ammunition, and it got me to thinking...have we become too dependent on technology? Have we become so dependent and expectant of perfection that we have gotten away from being able to handle mishaps and malfunctions?

I'm reminded of the scene in Top Gun where they're in the classroom going over the point of the TG Academy, which was dogfighting. During Vietnam the success rate went down due to the lack of adequate training. This was due in large part to the fact that perceived advantages of technology caused the mindset to get too lazy...dependent on technology, even to the point that the F-4 Phantom was not equipped with a gun. The ideology was that the close in dogfight was a thing of the past, and as a result our pilots didn't know what to do when an enemy Mig made it past their defenses.

Today most of us get really sideways if a gun has even a hint of a malfunction, myself included. Granted, of course, you want a reliable gun, but it seems to me the art of clearing jams and overcoming adversity is now a thing of the past. Shooters today are not properly trained with the combat mindset, and, as the result, are often lulled into the false sense of security that the gun and ammunition is supposed to be perfect. Well, the truth is NOTHING is perfect. Snowflakes have no idea what to do when someone tells them no, or they don't get a trophy, and many shooters are the same way. A gun jams, and they look like a statue sculpted to perfection with this dumbfounded expression as if to say "WHAT NOW"...instead of quickly recognizing what the problem is, clearing it and moving on, they freeze paralyzed by mush mind.

Have we become too complacent? What will we do if we are confronted with a salty bad guy who is only too willing to take our gun and beat our brains out when we freeze due to malfunction? Thoughts?
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
Im not sure if it's complacency or ignorance. Either one, with firearms, a lot of people think training is shooting bullseyes on paper or shooting steel. Most of us here know training goes so much deeper than that....including learning how to deal with malfunctions,low light,disabled shooting or defending yourself while injured...etc, the list goes on.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think the complacency stems from ignorance, whether it is willful or unintended, and it seems to be as the result of so many new shooters, and maybe not enough of them going to get suitable training. Could be other contributing factors, but this seems to be one thread.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agreed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
648 Posts
Someone on these forums has a signature that I have taken to heart. It goes something like, "In a time of crisis, you will not rise to the occasion, but will default to the level of training you have mastered." Buy some snap caps, drill combat reloads, breach clears, and disabled shooting. The only way to be prepared is to prepare yourself.
 

·
Resident Armorer Premium Member
Joined
·
15,060 Posts
GCBHM, I think we have already established, that the "Greatest Generation" kind of spoiled the "Baby Boomers", of which I and many of our older members are part of.

Each successive generation tries to make things easier for their offspring, so as has already been stated, the results are disappointing.

I hate to say it, but that's why there are so many "Liberals"... they expect everything be given to them with no effort on their part. "How DARE their pistol jam on THEM, just because they had something more fun to do, than clean a dirty old gun after firing a couple of hundred rounds a month ago!!!

Any way, ask any of the younger generation, and their answers will normally blame us... the "Boomers", because things are so screwed up!
 
  • Like
Reactions: GCBHM

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,298 Posts
Snowflakes have no idea what to do when someone tells them no, or they don't get a trophy, and many shooters are the same way.


Does that mean...

...we're the alpha male sheepdoggie mindset high situational awareness warriers? :eek:

Thinking that we're "better than them" (whomever they may be) is somewhat misleading.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,262 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Does that mean...

...we're the alpha male sheepdoggie mindset high situational awareness warriers? :eek:

Thinking that we're "better than them" (whomever they may be) is somewhat misleading.
How did you arrive at that conclusion?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
546 Posts
My first handgun was the Mosquito. Yeah, love em or hate em, I don't really care about the reviews. I suffered some with its fussy appetite, stove pipes, FTF, FTE and whatever else the poor little thing threw at me. As I broke it in, I realized that it had taught me valuable lessons. We grew and matured together. I learned how to quickly identify the type of failure, the safe way to remedy that failure and along the way I found my confidence rise.
I took my P226 to IPSC training drills and when I encountered an issue (with the P226 it was rare) I was able to quickly move past it and continue with the course of fire.
My Mosquito has turned into a pretty reliable gem and my reason for not giving it up is the lessons I learned along the way. Anyone that's had nothing but a reliable firearm has missed out on this important lesson unless they have done intentional clearing drills.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top