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because if I know I’m going to get into a gun battle I’m bringing a rifle - and I would just as soon not.

Scaring the criminal away is fine with me.

Been there done that - I’m behind my bedroom solid core door with a deadbolt - calling 911

As somebody said earlier: they watch too many movies

never understood why people think their DOOR is some type of cover or protection. If someone broke in depending how they do it. a door is easily busted down and or lock picked. at best depending on the situation it gives you some seconds to respond
 

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I am done with this thread - non sequitur responsiveness - there are those who have been there done that - learned from actual experience - and others like the much earlier poster:
just watch movies
 

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the scenario is the burglar just tried to enter an out building
Last 3 years on Oakland PD, I was an evidence tech (called CSI now). I'd go to up to 5 residential burglaries a day, so have seen how bad guys work. A common MO is to check all openings to see if somethings open, that way you get in with no noise or fuss. 'Course there are those that just kick the door, but that isn't nearly as common. So, the whole idea of using a cable, often on an exterior garage door which is a common entry point, is to trip the alarm with no damage to the structure. Bad guy flees. No loss. If this "trap" were not set, finding no easy way to get in, the bad guy will most often force entry, prying a door or breaking a window etc.

I'd often tell my "customers", if you leave a second floor window open, the bad guy will try to climb up to it. Never leave ladders, trash cans, or other climbing apparatus outside for the bad guy to use.
 

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yeah, they will do anything to reach their objective. I tell my girlfriend constantly to not leave her bag or purse in the car when she goes in somewhere and she always tells me she locks the doors. If they for some reason or another want that purse i tell her they will break out the window if they have to. She doesn't get it and has no understanding or a criminals mind or thought process.
 

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Last 3 years on Oakland PD, I was an evidence tech (called CSI now). I'd go to up to 5 residential burglaries a day, so have seen how bad guys work. A common MO is to check all openings to see if somethings open, that way you get in with no noise or fuss. 'Course there are those that just kick the door, but that isn't nearly as common. So, the whole idea of using a cable, often on an exterior garage door which is a common entry point, is to trip the alarm with no damage to the structure. Bad guy flees. No loss. If this "trap" were not set, finding no easy way to get in, the bad guy will most often force entry, prying a door or breaking a window etc.

I'd often tell my "customers", if you leave a second floor window open, the bad guy will try to climb up to it. Never leave ladders, trash cans, or other climbing apparatus outside for the bad guy to use.
Finally a cogent answer to my question. You are using the open door as a decoy. That would work against a prowler for sure, though I doubt if it would stop a home invasion, as they will come through the front door.
 

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i guess depending on your career (what you do) and how you live i my self would not set decoys welcoming trouble as i would a decoy for geese. i try to avoid trouble not lay bread crumbs welcoming it to my front door.
 

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Decoy might not have been the best word, but tripline and trap arent much better, since his goal is to scare the intruder off and not catch him. If one used this method to lure a criminal in, and then shot the criminal, there may be many locked doors in your future. I can only assume that he got tired of jumping out of bed everytime an animal set off his motions and cams. Of course I once had a dog who could open doors.
 

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if you are not a sworn in officer of the law you have no business tying to catch criminals or going out on the prowl looking for criminal behavior.

if so your intentions might be good but you 1.undermine the law.2. potentially encounter a situation you misread and then engage on cause of no proper training or experience in the field (no some course you took does not qualify you as experienced" 3. you could possible phuck up some ones investigation and or get an undercover killed.

the list goes on and on.

law enforcement does not go in blind. they have intelligence and resources and many other things to back and justify their play.

wanna be charles bronsons need to stay home and get their test boost at the range
 

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The main reasons you might want a suppressor here would be muzzle flash - which is significant in the dark when you’ve just woken up -and- to preserve your hearing to ascertain additional sounds that might represent secondary threats after the initial engagement.


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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Thanks for all of the answers. Fwiw, the movie post was tongue in cheek.

I recently took a class geared towards hardening one’s home, what to do if someone is in the home, etc. A single class makes me a single class above a complete novice. But the instructor encouraged one to consider the use of a suppressor for HD, and to do some simple things to make entry harder, so I’m glad for the points of view here (including the door tripline discussion, even though it wouldn’t work for me). As someone said, we each have to make our own decisions based on our experience (or lack thereof) and circumstances.
 

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Muzzle flash: especially in AR's., the use of government powders which are low bid means flash suppressant is often left out. In some of the latest ammunition adopted the maker used it to control ignition, the lower flash was a welcome side affect. A lot of civilian powders have less flash than expected.

Sound suppression: the silencer on the homeowners gun only controls it, and can't mitigate the sound of the perpetrators, which is pointed at the homeowner and directed toward them making it as loud as possible. Wearing electronic hearing muffs will mitigate it. A perp deliberately choosing to get into a firefight inside an owners home is thinking they have lower risk, after a few shots of an unsurpressed and high flash weapon the impact of being shot at is reassessed. A silencer isn't cheap either, often costing more than the host it's on.

Using that money to reinforce openings against attack - adding film to windows to resist breakage helps deter entry. Researching how home intrusions often involve a fake delivery or "my car broke down" gambit, the owner letting in the perps is actually frequent. Some thought on how to impede their approach to the door outside reduces those incidents, they assessed it would be an easy takedown, structure the situation where they can't take the advantage. A lot of perps also take on the appearance of utility or appliance servicemen, and approach from the rear during hours when the homeowner might be absent - the back door, basement, patio, breezeway and other out of sight locations are more vulnerable than beating down the front door openly.

As said, if your neighbor sees someone around an outbuilding, would they even raise the alarm? Not everyone would. Only the homeowner can make the effort, the first thing is to get experienced help determining what are the weak points and addressing them.

Being guncentric, firearms owners tend to think what new accessory or ammo would be an improvement, the reality is an appropriate see thru and difficult to scale fence, dog, lighting, perimeter alerts, window film, and other efforts to secure the exterior keeping the perp out completely are the better choice. All to often we default to the last resort - what gun for hungry black bear prying open the kitchen door on the back deck - when the answer may have been keep the trash secure and away, no grille, and at least get a yappy dog. It might be the next meal for a cougar - sorry, it happens a lot more now - but even that is an indicator of a predator that need addressing.

With that in mind, sorting a list of appropriate first response items then puts the silencer where it belongs, as a last resort - because multiple things failed and it's truly a catastrophe in the making. At that point the handgun is just an expedient crutch during an attempt to get to your primary rifle which should be equipped with high capacity and an owner willing to put rounds thru any internal partition to dissuade the perps from penetrating further. I know that is a loaded statement, however, we are now down to lanes of approach and appropriate directions of live fire - something we need to know for each and every scenario in order to prevent shooting into our family's hideout or our neighbors in close proximity.

Anyone who's seen an Infantry fighting position sketch with directions of fire, low spots, blind areas etc should realize the home has exactly the same issues - all too often we discuss the tools and equipment yet don't consider lanes of fire. My house suffers from a lot of tactical deficiencies - but I do study which direction I can direct fire with the knowledge that someone taking cover here or there may need to be hit. And the appropriate rifle in a penetrating cartridge can do that. Military Operations in Urban Terrain is the information more homeowners should seek. There are plenty of downloadable copies and it's free. Be advised that too many gangs are sending their people into the military to get that training first hand and bring it back - which is why they are so much more capable these days.

IN/MP - there is your tax dollars worth.
 

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For those who use a suppressor on your home defense pistol, what do you use? My bedside setup is currently a P229 Legion with a laser and light. I don’t want to start a huge debate about suppressor vs not suppressed (either the indoors point made by the Warrior Poet Society video or otherwise), but I’m still on the fence due to the added length when in use and for storage, and that I might need to take different steps for securing it(as an NFA item) vs just the pistol. Anyway, I’ve got a threaded barrel but I’ve not yet added a can (I’m considering an Osprey 45), so I’m open to suggestions.

Thanks in advance
Why do you need a suppressor? I'm not judging or anything. To save your hearing? I completely understand that but part of the effectiveness of a handgun is the loud report, that is the physiological part of getting shot. Believe me, I've been shot. The hearing of the shot and knowing you've been shot are part of what stops you.
 

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Get an adapter and oil filter. I'd say its probably better to not be suppressed so neighbors can call cops and know something is going on or wrong. If you wake or alert the neighbors, intruder has more reason to run.
 

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Why do you need a suppressor? I'm not judging or anything. To save your hearing? I completely understand that but part of the effectiveness of a handgun is the loud report, that is the physiological part of getting shot. Believe me, I've been shot. The hearing of the shot and knowing you've been shot are part of what stops you.
If you want a suppressor to act like an assassin you have to pay a tax and be registered a an NFA item because you don't need it unless you're an assassin.
Considering you just made this comment elsewhere, I don't believe you're coming from a non-judgemental place at all.
 
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