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I don’t want to start a huge debate about suppressor vs not suppressed .... but I’m still on the fence due to the added length when in use and for storage...so I’m open to suggestions.
You start out by saying you don't want a debate about suppressor vs not suppressed but then basically beg the reader to do just that. :unsure:
Are you saying you only want suggestions that are pro-suppressor?

My suggestion? Don't get a silencer for your pistol. Get one for your rifle and make sure it's a short barreled rifle so the extra length of the suppressor isn't as much of a hindrance.

Which brings me to...

You need to be able to hear the others and they need to hear you.
If your concerned about any weapon being taken from you then get some training, those few inches are not a make or break deal.
The ringing may not go away, I took an ear plug out in 1986 so I could hear my spotter while on the M2, the ringing has never stopped, don't assume it will.
I always can when I can.
:ROFLMAO:

How much training have you had since your M2 days? Being disarmed in CQB is a very realistic concern and no amount of training will negate the laws of physics. Adding 5-8+ inches of length to a pistol is kind of a big deal. It's going to double a pistol's overall length and way more than double the leverage someone can apply if they manage to grab the silencer/muzzle on your pistol.

If we were talking about "should I buy a handgun with a 4, 5 or 6 inch barrel?" I might agree that an inch or two is a relatively inconsequential decision. When we're talking about 5 inches or 13 inches that's a significant difference. Probably at least twice as easy to disarm someone with an equipped silencer. Is that enough to make or break in a self defense encounter? Well... my crystal ball into the future is cloudy and my Magic 8-Ball says, "Ask again later".

A handgun's chief benefit over a rifle/shotgun in a CQB is it's increased maneuverabiltiy. Intentionally diluting that mobility is a decision that has considerable tactical implications. I can't tell anyone what is right for their particular situation/threat assessment but telling someone, "It doesn't matter" strikes me as being poor advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
You start out by saying you don't want a debate about suppressor vs not suppressed but then basically beg the reader to do just that. :unsure:
Are you saying you only want suggestions that are pro-suppressor?

My suggestion? Don't get a silencer for your pistol. Get one for your rifle and make sure it's a short barreled rifle so the extra length of the suppressor isn't as much of a hindrance.

Which brings me to...



:ROFLMAO:

How much training have you had since your M2 days? Being disarmed in CQB is a very realistic concern and no amount of training will negate the laws of physics. Adding 5-8+ inches of length to a pistol is kind of a big deal. It's going to double a pistol's overall length and way more than double the leverage someone can apply if they manage to grab the silencer/muzzle on your pistol.

If we were talking about "should I buy a handgun with a 4, 5 or 6 inch barrel?" I might agree that an inch or two is a relatively inconsequential decision. When we're talking about 5 inches or 13 inches that's a significant difference. Probably at least twice as easy to disarm someone with an equipped silencer. Is that enough to make or break in a self defense encounter? Well... my crystal ball into the future is cloudy and my Magic 8-Ball says, "Ask again later".

A handgun's chief benefit over a rifle/shotgun in a CQB is it's increased maneuverabiltiy. Intentionally diluting that mobility is a decision that has considerable tactical implications. I can't tell anyone what is right for their particular situation/threat assessment but telling someone, "It doesn't matter" strikes me as being poor advice.
My bad. The first post is mine, and I did beg the question about length and storage. But I was hoping to not get into “make it as loud AF” vs “save your hearing”, as I’ve decided on the latter (as between those two views). But I appreciate your input.

The second post isn’t mine. But your points on length after are valid.
 

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Another point to consider. If you shoot a suppressed P229 40 in the house (same goes for an AR pistol with can but even more so), unless they're completely deaf already, everyone in the house is going to be wide awake after the first round. The only exceptions I own that might be "sleep safe" are 22 LR cans shooting sub-sonics - especially in a bolt gun (like you probably won't be using for HD in any case. Suppressed 22's are quieter than a moderated ('nuther word for built in can) PCP air rifle, which would be small back yard neighbor quiet (as long as they are indoors).

A couple more plusses, the can cuts way down on secondary recoil - not much of a concern on the guns we're talking about. It also does a good job of mitigating muzzle flash, a real issue with the AR-pistol.

With most any can, shooting it dry (no water or cable lube etc. inside), there is going to be a "first round pop" i.e. the first round will be a good bit louder than subsequent shots. This is due to the oxygen within the can supporting the combustion of unburned powder. This raises pressure in the can and contributes to muzzle blast - which will still be way quieter than with no can - O2 in the can is consumed and not replaced so subsequent shots will be quieter. I mention this to reinforce the notion that it's most unlikely there will be occupants sleeping through your "bad guy live fire drill".
 

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Now that we’ve opened the discussion up to real world parameters, I will offer my opinion. If, and its a big If given my already stated concerns, I were to decide on a suppressor for my bedside handgun, I would lean towards the shortest one I could find. I would value shorter length much higher than price or efficiency. I would even factor in having the shortest barrel length host, in order to reduce the swing.

In every home defense discussion I’ve ever heard, where the discussion about SBRs mentions maneuverability, the length is the only factor in the SBRs favor. That consideration doesn’t go away just because we start talking about handguns. It’s even a consideration in home defense shotguns.

I live in a safe area and live a below the radar life, especially as relates to home invasion type encounters, and let’s be honest, that is what we are talking about. By the time that behavior starts happening around my house, I’ve either moved on to greener pastures, or the Sh1t has hit the fan across the whole country and hearing loss is no longer my over riding concern. My biggest vulnerability is my daily trek into the wild, while chasing the legal tender, and a suppressor doesn’t factor into my EDC. Again, if I can’t wisely avoid a MadMax type road encounter, hearing loss has moved down the list.

That SBR with a can leaning in the corner does give me a Grin when thinking about it. ;)
 

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We all have fire extinguishers (right?) in case of a fire. We all probably have insurance for those just in case scenarios. I’ve never had to use either. If I had to leave a gun on the nightstand or a loaded up AR leaning against the bed due to security concerns at home, I’d probably move.

Having said all of that, if I thought I was gonna pop off a round in the house, I can see the merits of a can in terms of hearing protection. Keep in mind, in many jurisdictions, the cops are gonna take your gun and can for some amount of time no matter how righteous your actions.

Here’s what I’ve done to prevent having to pop off a round in the house...
  • I live in a gated community
  • I have motion detector lights
  • I have a big dog
If I needed to get to a gun & flashlight at o’dark thirty, I can easily do that. And, yes, I do keep loaded guns ready to go. But not next to my bed within arms reach. I just don’t think my particular circumstance call for it - it’s not like I’m going be awoken from a deep slumber by a cartel hitman tapping me on the forehead with his silencer. And if that’s a risk, see my 4th sentence above.

Don’t get me wrong, I have no reservations against popping the bad guy or calling down fire on my position if I’m about to be overrun, I just don’t think it’ll happen. My number one goal in life is to never have to expose my life/safety/security/family/finances by being mauled through the criminal justice system in this country. That’s more of a risk in some locations than others (and a prime reason I moved from Chicago to a sleepy little beach town), yet it could happen anywhere. I don’t want to shoot anybody, much less anybody of the wrong color.
 

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I keep a pair of hearing protection ear muffs near my home EDC firearms. Visible, hanging in the way of firearm access.

No NFA. Compact firearm. Multiple firearms usable. Hearing preserved.

Firing indoors is much different than firing outdoors. 9mm is real loud. Now, imagine a .300 BLK or 5.55 mm round indoors?
 
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Here’s what I’ve done to prevent having to pop off a round in the house...
  • I live in a gated community
  • I have motion detector lights
  • I have a big dog
I too live in a gated community, have outside motion lights, two dogs, security cameras 360 degrees, and a professionally installed, hard-wired alarm system covering every opening (I own an alarm company so get freebees). That said, this still happened (he did not gain entry to the house proper, but tried, he then opened an intentionally "unlocked" door on the RV garage. That door is further secured with a cable so it can open a few inches, tripping the alarm. He fled (not shown on this clip).

From my time in law enforcement, I know there is less crime in rural areas. However, when it does occur, it tends to be more serious as a general rule. Just experience, have seen to studies to confirm.


 

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❤the idea of a protected unlocked door with a cable 👍
I must have missed something. What’s the point? The only thing you can accomplish is maybe getting his identity from a camera.
 

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For those who use a suppressor on your home defense pistol, what do you use? My bedside setup is currently a P229 Legion with a laser and light. I don’t want to start a huge debate about suppressor vs not suppressed (either the indoors point made by the Warrior Poet Society video or otherwise), but I’m still on the fence due to the added length when in use and for storage, and that I might need to take different steps for securing it(as an NFA item) vs just the pistol. Anyway, I’ve got a threaded barrel but I’ve not yet added a can (I’m considering an Osprey 45), so I’m open to suggestions.

Thanks in advance
New to these forums. after reading some I feel like I have found some like minded folks.

I too believe in keeping my sidearm bedside. I have no children in the house. So no worries there.
I never understood why some people buy any type of firearm for defense/home protection and they keep it in a safe or up in their closest.

If someone breaks into your home and you are asleep your reaction time if any at all is going to be a very small window of opportunity.

Amazes me when you tell someone this and they respond by saying you are paranoid or going over board. Sure the odds of that happening to you are very very long indeed but its on the news everyday. Happens hundreds of times a day/night. People are just not aware of the facts.

"discretion is the better part of valor" will Always ring true
 

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avoidance over confrontation

deconfliction is my motto
agreed completly.

very few times will you actually be cornered into a situation unless you allow yourself to be.

there are rare instances that even though you deescalate/avoid where some will just keep pushing though. you just need to know when to draw the line

life is too short, family is to precocious and freedoms are underappreciated. so many reasons not to act a fool and push for incidents to occur.
 

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Fair point. I don’t mind the discourse at all, especially if new points are made. But I was just hoping that- within a subset of possible replies - that folks would say “your Osprey sucks compared to x” etc. If one ignores my first sentence, then the replies just are not as helpful to me and my question. FWIW I was swayed initially by the WPS point, but my hearing sucks and I’ve also suffered a recent TBI, so I’m more attuned to stuff I cared less about before. So if someone says “you shouldn’t use a suppressor at all” that’s ok, it’s just not responsive to my post.
What is better Chevy or Ford....Coke or Pepsi? They are all good for the most part....just different taste for different people. Oh and what is your favorite holster? [in your drawer full of holsters].
 

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I have suppressors but not on my bedside handgun mostly because I don't think the juice is worth the squeeze.

If I was really worried about maximum effectiveness while still being hearing safe, I would grab my suppressed 300BLK SBR
 

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avoidance over confrontation

deconfliction is my motto
I must need more coffee. The place is lit up like an airport. Like I said before, unless you are wanting to ID him with a hidden camera, what does it accomplish. Setting up that scenario does nothing but let you know he was there. The camera does that anyway. Please explain the advantage to this.
 

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New to these forums. after reading some I feel like I have found some like minded folks.

I too believe in keeping my sidearm bedside. I have no children in the house. So no worries there.
I never understood why some people buy any type of firearm for defense/home protection and they keep it in a safe or up in their closest.

If someone breaks into your home and you are asleep your reaction time if any at all is going to be a very small window of opportunity.

Amazes me when you tell someone this and they respond by saying you are paranoid or going over board. Sure the odds of that happening to you are very very long indeed but its on the news everyday. Happens hundreds of times a day/night. People are just not aware of the facts.

"discretion is the better part of valor" will Always ring true

Like you stated, you have no children in your house so your concerns are much different than others that do have children in the house. There is absolutely nothing wrong with keeping a HD gun locked up and inaccessible by children. My setup works for me and has been tested since my wife is a light sleeper and has woke me up a couple of times when she thought she heard a bump in the night. I love reading the close minded posts where words like "I never" "You should always"... Everyone's situation is a little bit different and while we all have opinions on these topics we have to make the best decisions for ourselves.
 

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Like you stated, you have no children in your house so your concerns are much different than others that do have children in the house. There is absolutely nothing wrong with keeping a HD gun locked up and inaccessible by children. My setup works for me and has been tested since my wife is a light sleeper and has woke me up a couple of times when she thought she heard a bump in the night. I love reading the close minded posts where words like "I never" "You should always"... Everyone's situation is a little bit different and while we all have opinions on these topics we have to make the best decisions for ourselves.

agreed. i try to never speak in absolutes
 

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because if I know I’m going to get into a gun battle I’m bringing a rifle - and I would just as soon not.

Scaring the criminal away is fine with me.

Been there done that - I’m behind my bedroom solid core door with a deadbolt - calling 911

As somebody said earlier: they watch too many movies
 
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