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Discussion Starter #1
While this isn't technically a Sig firearm in this case, I could see the same situation happening to anyone who mounts a Leupold DeltaPoint to their gun (plz mods, no bully).

While removing the optic from the slide of a Walther Q5, I stripped a screwhead. Then, I drilled into the screw, inserted an EZ out, and that snapped.

Can anyone recommend the best tool / procedure for removing a hardened steel EZ out, and the screw I was trying to remove in the first place?
 

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Man.. I wish I had something besides sympathy to offer. I've never been in your position.
I believe I'd be seeking some professional help if it were my problem. I hope someone has something more helpful for you.
 

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The first thing you want to do is remove the EZ Out. I find using a wide rubber band, one of those ~3/16" wide ones, helps considerably. Place the rubber band over the EZ Out so you are covering the EZ Out with the width of the rubber band. Then, using a Phillips screwdriver, you may need to try a few different sizes to find the tip that catches and gives you traction, wind the EZ Out back out.

The rubber band is providing some traction between the screwdriver tip and the EZ Out. I used this technique last week when the head of a 1911 grip screw sheared off. I was able to remove the remaining shaft of the screw from the grip screw bushing, E Z - P Z.

Once you get the EZ Out removed, apply some heat to the screw you are trying to remove. Most likely some Loctite in there, heat will be your friend. But caution is called for, you don't want to torch the circuitry in your optic. Maybe the pointy tip of a soldering iron would serve this purpose.

Good luck.
 

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If Malicious Compliance's suggestion doesn't work, if the EZ Out, acts like a carbon steel drill bit, or tap, you should be able to "shatter" it. This means supporting the slide from the bottom, to prevent downward movement, and with a good appropriate sized center punch, with a decent sized hammer.

There are EZ Out removal tools, but considering where it is at, probably not enough room.
 

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How much would a smith charge for this?

Not sure an 1/8" bit will work for you in this situation but I just ordered one of the 1/8" "rescue bits".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=265&v=vvOfUvzgmEA

I ordered straight from the website, https://the-original-rescue-bit.myshopify.com/ free shipping and the code "mycode15" ended up with a price of $38.24. I have never spent this much on a bit before but after using up other bits on a broke easy out I am giving this a try. I can use this with my Foredom for many other projects, and hopefully save myself some grief if it is as good as many people say it is.

Good luck.
 

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Another option, but again considering the optics, right there, in the way is "flash freezing" then striking a "lighter" blow, to shatter with a center punch.

I may be wrong, but Heartlander's suggestion could have merit, but I believe 1/8" is "larger" than the original screw, which is probably a #6, a #8 at best.

A "final" attempt, with a good "sharp" center punch, or ***** punch, would be to try and tap the EZ Out back out. It could take time... but in this case time is the "cheapest" solution at this point.

Good Luck!!!

(OMG can't believe it censored the proper name of a punch!!!)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How much would a smith charge for this?

Not sure an 1/8" bit will work for you in this situation but I just ordered one of the 1/8" "rescue bits".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=265&v=vvOfUvzgmEA

I ordered straight from the website, https://the-original-rescue-bit.myshopify.com/ free shipping and the code "mycode15" ended up with a price of $38.24. I have never spent this much on a bit before but after using up other bits on a broke easy out I am giving this a try. I can use this with my Foredom for many other projects, and hopefully save myself some grief if it is as good as many people say it is.

Good luck.
Thanks. I'm not sure if 1/8" would be small enough, but I would like to hear your experience with this bit.
 

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Here's some ideas, preceded with some "hope it's not too late" cautions:

If the EZ-out is in there crooked or off axis so it's cutting into the side wall of the original hole - that's a very bad thing.

EZ-outs, thread taps as well, can be bad news in small sizes. They are hard and cheaper ones can be overly brittle. Go gently and easy, you can feel the torque and stop in time with practice. Time is your friend, apply penetrating oil and wait some or tap it with small hammer to break up any corrosion. Apply heat if you can.

When initially experiencing driver bit slipping, camming or "rounding out" the screw. Stop!! Check for warn tool bit. Apply penetrating oil. The very best penetrating oil is a home brew, 50/50 mixture of ATF (transmission fluid) and acetone - shake before use if it separates.

You can try heating the fastener if materials are "safe" to heat.

A dab of valve lapping compound applied to screwdriver tip or fastener will enhance friction and help prevent camming.

Superglue will sometimes work between driver tip and fastener sort of like the lapping compound - delay turning for a minute or two. Obviously don't get the glue down into the threads, best to apply a tiny bit to

Depending on fastener size, for bigger ones, they make a special fastener removal welding rod. You place a nut over the hole and strike an arc down in the hole, moving the rod out. The flux protects the original hole threads and the weld puddle is then "spread" into the nut. Apply wrench and out it comes - - usually. If even a small fastener is broken off at or above the surface, a small TIG welder can be used to weld on a small nut - works the same as the special welding rod, only with more finesse.

Use a rotary tool (Dremel etc) and small abrasive cut-off wheel to cut a new screwdriver slot in the fastener. In this case you would want to grind down the wheel to a smaller diameter first, so there's less collateral damage. This obviously works best on a fastener that is not broken off deep.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all of the great advice, everyone. Ya'll thought of solutions I'd not even imagined. What an incredible community we have here!

Turns out I have a machinist about .25 miles from me. He said he'd be able to handle this for a nominal fee, and to pick it up this weekend. I'll keep you posted.
 

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A couple more random thoughts.

Prevention is better than fixing.

On stainless fasteners (and you cant' necessarily test with a magnet, as ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are magnetic). it's good to use an anti-seize on the threads to prevent galling.

"Fit" a screwdriver, especially a well used Phillips, as you gently turn back and forth, ideally there should be no movement between tip and screw. If it moves, get another driver that fits. #2 Phillips is most common, there are other flavors and sizes. Inspect tips for wear.

Same with slotted screws, especially working on guns, parallel sided drivers that are a close fit to the screw are what's right.

If a small fastener doesn't turn as expected, don't hunker down on it! You are big and strong, you will win . . . by breaking it (and you lose :c). Take your time, penetrating oil, let it soak etc.
 
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