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I have had the good fortune over the past month to find two used Sig Legion series pistols in like new condition. One is a p226 which I now have roughly a 1000 rounds through and a p229 with 300 through it which I just received yesterday.

Both the DA and SA (and reset) on the p226 are outstanding, Just incredibly smooth. In fact, I handed it to a long-time friend who is a shooting instructor for the State Police and asked him to try it. When he tried the DA on the 226 his eyebrows shot up and when I asked to work the reset his jaw literally dropped. The look on his face was priceless.

But the point of my post is this: I haven't had a chance to actually shoot the 229 yet so everything comes from dry firing it to this point. The difference in the triggers is very noticeable. I have a several other p2XX series guns, listed in my signature, and all of them have short reset triggers. The 229 Legion is not noticeably different right now then any of those.

I know I am comparing a gun, albeit a Legion, with 300 rounds to guns with many more rounds through them but I am asking members of this forum if, based on your collective experience, I can expect the P229 to reach the same smooth performance as my 226 Legion when the round count has grown.

All of the reviews I have read and viewed rave about the 229 trigger right out of the box. Right now I am a little disappointed.

Thanks in advance for your comments.\
 

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You may have to adjust the trigger to get it where it is like the P226. Once you get it set, Loctite it. That is what Bruce told me to do.
 
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What adjustments are there on a Legion 229?

All triggers on the Legion series guns have the GG adjustable system which can be adjusted with the hex screw located on the trigger just inside the frame. You can adjust the over-travel movement of the trigger to suit your desire.


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I wouldn't say well advertised... certainly news to me. I understand they are short reset, but thought that was the extent of it. Granted, I'm a newbie to Sig.

https://www.sigsauer.com/store/p229-legion-compact.html

Excerpt from SIGs site "FEATURES":
Grayguns Inc. P-SAIT Trigger
The Grayguns trigger strikes the perfect balance between a short-reach trigger and the standard length trigger. This intermediate trigger is adjustable for over travel.
 

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Congrats on your P226 & P229 Legions!!

My experience with these Legion triggers is limited to one new P220 Legion and two Grayguns P-PAK kits installed in P220 MSE and Mk25. These triggers have a hex set screw located under the locking block to adjust the trigger's over-travel.

I made this adjustment on the 2 kits I installed, but the Legion's trigger was fine out-of-the-box. I've run the P-PAK guns ~ thousand rounds with no Lactite and no adjustments have been necessary.

IMO, this set screw has nothing to do with the action or trigger's 'smoothness' - only its over-travel. All 3 of these pistols had VERY smooth trigger actions from the beginning. So your P229 Legion may need something more than a set screw adjustment.

If you're feeling roughness in this 229 Legion's DA trigger pull - I mean, even a mild version of dragging an anchor down a gravel road - That's just not right!!

There are several things that could create a rough trigger action in a low round count pistol: Damage or corrosion to the trigger's pivot pin, action bar, sear, hammer, hammer strut, etc.

I would do a disassembly and close inspection of your P229. It may be as simple as someone spilled some corrosive like Hoppe's 9 in the frame, and there's some light rust that's easily buffed out. And, if needed you can adjust for the trigger's over-travel too.

Cheers
 

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-snip-
IMO, this set screw has nothing to do with the action or trigger's 'smoothness' - only its over-travel. -snip-
Cheers
Agree.

Also, keep in mind SIG's production guns, even the Legions, are not hand fitted - they are assembled.

The critical parts that affect the "smoothness" and pull weight of the gun in SA mode, are primarily the sear and hammer interface - that tiny area where the sear holds the hammer back.

The sear and hammer are MIM parts, with no post molding/heat treating machining done. They are ostensibly high quality MIM parts, with tolerances held close. BUT (and that's a big butt) they are not all the same. The vagaries are enough to cause significant variation from one gun to the next.

The primary contributor to SA pull weight is the Positive sear angle, as I've said in prior posts. Watch the hammer from the side as you slowly pull the trigger dry-fire. You will most likely see the hammer cam back a tiny amount (move further back further compressing the mainspring) before release hammer release.

This is what those parts look like when installed in the gun, though I've just adjusted the sear angle, you can tell by looking at its pivot, and the primary angle of the sear, that in order to move out of the hammer notch the camming action must occur.



There's obviously more to smoothing than the above, as kansascity45 notes. And adjusting sear angles is not something I'd recommend without the proper fixtures, tooling etc. (or TheSigArmorer's help).

Note the sear in the picture above has been modified, sear angle at the sear tip is near neutral and not stock - (it isn't necessary or desirable to regrind the whole thing as it would screw up full cock position, so just the very tip is changed and that is not so apparent in the pic). Also, in my pic, the hammer is from a '90s gun and is not MIM, the sear is MIM and is being used for to obtain the short reset function. One of my future projects (if I get time) is to come up with a good way to just modify the original sear for short reset - I already have made new safety levers to obtain more firing pin block clearance.
 

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Mr Bumper may correctly describe SIG OEM action components. To be clear, here's Grayguns description of their P-PAK:

"Grayguns’s advanced tool-steel fire control components are precision machined and carefully heat treated for maximum durability, then hand finished, detail polished and gauged for perfect fit and function. Our new P-Series Perfection Action Kit (P-PAK) is like buying a Grayguns action package in a bag: custom-grade results using parts of unequaled quality, all without the extra expense and shop time of sending your pistol to us.

We’ve put our four decades of experience working on SIG SAUER® P-Series pistols for elite and high-volume shooters into our P-PAK fire control components. Our hammer, sear, safety lever and our new P-Series Adjustable Intermediate Trigger were carefully engineered to work together fluidly for a dead-smooth DA pull, clean SA break, positive tactile reset and minimum over travel."



Cheers
 

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https://www.sigsauer.com/store/p229-legion-compact.html

Excerpt from SIGs site "FEATURES":
Grayguns Inc. P-SAIT Trigger
The Grayguns trigger strikes the perfect balance between a short-reach trigger and the standard length trigger. This intermediate trigger is adjustable for over travel.
Just looked at my 226 Legion DA/SA i don't see any adjustment screw. I can't see how the trigger can be adjusted for over travel unless maybe you take it apart. I am 62 with poor eye sight, i could be wrong. I thought i had read that the SAO triggers where adjustable.:confused::confused::confused:
 

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Just looked at my 226 Legion DA/SA i don't see any adjustment screw. I can't see how the trigger can be adjusted for over travel unless maybe you take it apart. I am 62 with poor eye sight, i could be wrong. I thought i had read that the SAO triggers where adjustable.:confused::confused::confused:
With the slide removed, look down into the frame just froward of the locking block insert. You should see a allen head screw on the top front of the trigger.
You will also have to cock the hammer and pull back the slack on the trigger to see it.
Revolver
 

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In the P-PAK pic above the set screw is located on the trigger's extension just left of its pivot pin hole. On your 226, you'll probably need a light to see under the locking block. Hold your 226's frame with the top of the dust cover towards you. You'll see the top of the screw. It's easy to adjust with a hex key...

Cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks for all the comments. I love the amount of knowledge that this forum provides. I have spent more time with my two legions since my original post and want to update some things.

Specifically, I spent time comparing the triggers on my two Legions with my M11-A1, p220 and p239. Basically, my favorites from my gun "collection". The last three are well broken in and all have short reset triggers. When I first shot the 226 Legion I was struck, as was my good friend who is a shooting instructor for the state police, at how smooth the initial pull was when starting the DA cycle. The M11-A1, 220 and 239 were less so but with the 229 Legion you feel an immediate wall when starting your pull in DA. The actual feel after you get past that initial wall is without grit and proceeds very smoothly.

I don't have a trigger gauge to measure the actual number of pounds of pull. I can liken it to other guns I have had. It reminds me of some revolvers I have fired where the startup of that DA trigger requires a very conscious effort to start the trigger moving.

To put it another way, with the other four guns there is no awareness of the firmness at the beginning of the pull whereas with my 229 Legion you are definitely aware of that "wall". In actual shooting I just focus on the front sight and begin the trigger pull without having my mind distracted by the initiation of the pull. With the 229 I am "distracted" from my concentration on the sight to thinking about the trigger.

I hope these examples make sense and can further clarify the issue I feel is happening with my 229 Legion. I would simply dismiss this as being symptomatic of a new gun that is not broken in yet (only 300 rounds down range and minimal dry-firing).

Thanks again for all of your comments.
 

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Thanks for all the comments. I love the amount of knowledge that this forum provides. I have spent more time with my two legions since my original post and want to update some things.

Specifically, I spent time comparing the triggers on my two Legions with my M11-A1, p220 and p239. Basically, my favorites from my gun "collection". The last three are well broken in and all have short reset triggers. When I first shot the 226 Legion I was struck, as was my good friend who is a shooting instructor for the state police, at how smooth the initial pull was when starting the DA cycle. The M11-A1, 220 and 239 were less so but with the 229 Legion you feel an immediate wall when starting your pull in DA. The actual feel after you get past that initial wall is without grit and proceeds very smoothly.

I don't have a trigger gauge to measure the actual number of pounds of pull. I can liken it to other guns I have had. It reminds me of some revolvers I have fired where the startup of that DA trigger requires a very conscious effort to start the trigger moving.

To put it another way, with the other four guns there is no awareness of the firmness at the beginning of the pull whereas with my 229 Legion you are definitely aware of that "wall". In actual shooting I just focus on the front sight and begin the trigger pull without having my mind distracted by the initiation of the pull. With the 229 I am "distracted" from my concentration on the sight to thinking about the trigger.

I hope these examples make sense and can further clarify the issue I feel is happening with my 229 Legion. I would simply dismiss this as being symptomatic of a new gun that is not broken in yet (only 300 rounds down range and minimal dry-firing).

Thanks again for all of your comments.
Just a thought... Does the hammer on the 229 seem harder to cock than the 226 or the M11? Cocking it with your thumb of course.
 
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