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I recently purchased a 716 Patrol brand new. I filled the mag with ammo and pulled the charging handle to load one into the chamber, I pulled the trigger, and "click".... So I attempted to pull the charging handle back to clear the chamber and I cannot pull it back. It's like the gun froze up. This was my very first attempt at shooting this brand new rifle! Now what do I do? I have a live round in the rifle.
 

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Did you clean it before you loaded it up then attempted to shoot it? Few and far in between are new firearms that you can just unbox and shoot without cleaning first! Also, do you know what "pogo" means as it applies to AR variants, by doing the pogo you may be able to extract and eject the live round.
 

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Mine did that even after a cleaning. Your bolt didn't go into full battery so it's lugs are locking it up. You'll have to tap the bolt carrier group in so they rotate and allow you to pull it out. Pointing it in a safe direction, tap the forward assist. If that doesn't work, try to remove the upper from the lower. (This is how Ive had to clear mine) Point the rifle in a safe direction and with a rubber mallet, (or block of wood behind the bolt carriers fall you have is a steel hammer) tap the bolt closed, and then pull the charging handle to extract the round.
 

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I recently purchased a 716 Patrol brand new. I filled the mag with ammo and pulled the charging handle to load one into the chamber, I pulled the trigger, and "click".... So I attempted to pull the charging handle back to clear the chamber and I cannot pull it back. It's like the gun froze up. This was my very first attempt at shooting this brand new rifle! Now what do I do? I have a live round in the rifle.
That doesn't bode well. There is a video on YouTube from a gentleman named "Spike" if I recall. He had the same issue with the 716 -- bolt stuck with a live round in the chamber. Please exercise great care in clearing the firearm. I think that in the case of "Spike's" 716, the problem eventually corrected itself after a break-in period. There are other posts on this board reporting similar issues that you can search. If, after clearing the rifle, the problem persists, don't waste any more time than you need to. Call SIG customer service and send the gun back to them. They'll know what it needs, as they appear to see quite a few "returns."

IMHO, the issues aren't related to the lubricants that SIG uses. While I agree that one should field strip a new gun and lubricate it properly before first use, it would have to be over-lubricated to a ridiculous degree before it would affect functionality like this -- i.e., where a bolt gets locked over a live round on the first attempt at firing. These are battle rifles and should be able to run reliably on the dry or wet side of the lubrication spectrum.

I don't want to speculate about the cause of your difficulty, but some of these 716s have very tight chambers. Give it a another go. You didn't say what ammunition you were using. Try another brand. If you have any more difficulty, SIG will make it right.
 

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The mag is out right ? Yeah smack the forward assist to fully seat the round. Or if the BCG is far enough forward where you can open the gun up and pull the BCG and charging handle out the back and either let the round drop back out of the chamber or send a cleaning rod or long 1/4" wooden dowel rod in to push it back out if it's stuck in there.



-Mike
 

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I was at the NRA and spoke with a marketing director in the Sig booth, telling him I had some feed and extraction issues. Folks on this forum said they sent their weapons in and got mostly a polishing job, which seemed like a big pain for something I can do myself. He asked me if my bolt had the new dual extractors on it, and then showed me one from the floor model. Mine did not, so I went ahead and sent it in. I am not sure how well it will run when I get it back, but I would have not trusted it in a situation as it was.:confused: I will do an update thread when I get the riffle back and test it.
 

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From the feedback on this forum, the changeout to the dual extractor seems to take care of the issues for most if not all.
 

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From the feedback on this forum, the changeout to the dual extractor seems to take care of the issues for most if not all.
Actually, the revised bolt has dual ejectors, not dual extractors. And there are posts here from folks with 716s that have the dual ejector bolt and who still have experienced FTE, FTF and other problems. A sticking bolt over a live round isn't likely caused by an ejector issue, although I suppose anything is possible.

One thing that is a constant is that SIG eventually fixes the problem, most of the time on the first visit back to Exeter.

Good luck and let us know what SIG did to your rifle when you get it back, and if it cured the issue.
 

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Actually, the revised bolt has dual ejectors, not dual extractors. And there are posts here from folks with 716s that have the dual ejector bolt and who still have experienced FTE, FTF and other problems. A sticking bolt over a live round isn't likely caused by an ejector issue, although I suppose anything is possible.
I seem to have had a problem sorting my x's from j's...
 

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You probably have a "tight" chamber that is not allowing the bolt to fully lock, and therefore the firing pin can't strike the primer. The case is "stuck" and the mechanical leverage for manual extraction is poor in this system. You'll have to tap the round out with a 1/4" wood dowel. I have had this happen to me twice with new commercial rifles over the years, but both were bolt actions and had the leverage to fully chamber and extract the cartridge. Military chambers are a little "loose" to avoid this problem and provide maximum reliability under all conditions, and fired brass from a military range usually shows a lot of expansion. Many commercial users reload and don't like "bulged" brass, so commercial rifles tend to have smaller chambers to avoid complaints. You could also have a "stacking of tolerances" with a minimum spec chamber and a maximum spec cartridge. Send it to Sig and the will make it right.
 

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The only time I had a problem with my 716 is when I reloaded some military brass that was slightly bulging (not visible to the eye). I ended up replacing the resizing die on my press and haven't had a problem since.
 
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