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I can't say for sure but if you are worried about the service life of an alloy frame P series IMHO you worry over nothing.

If an alloy frame pistol is properly lubricated and routine maintenance is preformed it will have an extremely long service life.

Sigs need to be shot "wet" which means that the rails must be properly greased for all range outings.
I have used Lubriplate for over 40 years on all of my weapons and have never worn one out.

Of course I have replaced springs on a scheduled basis and night sights after 10-12 years.
 
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Properly-maintained and fed appropriately-charged ammunition, they'll both live longer than you will.

There may be a definitive answer to your question, but if there is it's merely academic.
 

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I'm sure stainless steel is much more durable than aluminum alloy, but I really doubt any of us could wear out a properly lubricated SIG frame/slide combo made from either metal. The barrel is another story.
 

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Maybe but keep in mind that the aluminum alloy P226 is anodized and has a large steel locking insert that takes the brunt of the force. As mentioned keeping the frame rails well lubed and also changing the recoil spring every 5000 rounds and it will last a really long time. Many reports from credible sources of 9MM P226 and P228s lasting well over 100,000 rounds fired. That would be a LOT of dollars in ammo fired. I can't recall the source offhand but I remember reading about that the steel frame is harder on some of the internal parts than aluminum alloy frame.

Myself I have two aluminum alloy frame P226s. I like the lighter weight and never give a second thought about frame life.

Some early West German P226s with the "mud rails" were prone to frame cracking but SIG remedied that decades ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Maybe but keep in mind that the aluminum alloy P226 is anodized and has a large steel locking insert that takes the brunt of the force. As mentioned keeping the frame rails well lubed and also changing the recoil spring every 5000 rounds and it will last a really long time. Many reports from credible sources of 9MM P226 and P228s lasting well over 100,000 rounds fired. That would be a LOT of dollars in ammo fired. I can't recall the source offhand but I remember reading about that the steel frame is harder on some of the internal parts than aluminum alloy frame.

Myself I have two aluminum alloy frame P226s. I like the lighter weight and never give a second thought about frame life.

Some early West German P226s with the "mud rails" were prone to frame cracking but SIG remedied that decades ago.
Does the stainless frame P226 have a steel locking block?
 

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Is the service life of a full stainless P226 longer than that of an aluminum framed P226?
I think that everyone responding is right... and in one point in particular, and that is lubrication. Stainless is a fickle "steel" in that it doesn't like itself in particular. IIRC, same alloy interactions tend to "gall" each other, that's why using the correct lubricants is important.
 
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