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SC trigger slap or jerk or tightening fingers

1300 Views 5 Replies 5 Participants Last post by  doug86
320sc and I went to the range. New sights and they are centered. However the attached picture shows my issue. Low left.

I read this is slapping or jerkin the trigger. This was nothing but fundamental smooth press to the rear. Wall, bang, click and repeat. Am I over gripping?

Humbly
Pappa

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Personally I don't see an issue with your grouping. That said, I have a P320sc as well. Took it to the range for first run and I could hardly put a round on the target. Sight picture etc was good. Rounds, like yours, hitting low left.

Second run at the range started the same way. Started brainstorming everything I was doing. Decided to adjust my trigger finger location. I usually use center of the first pad on the finger. Moved to first joint and rounds started to fall in place.

I can only conclude that the shorter/smaller grip was affecting my pull.
 

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I see a couple of things to look at.

One is how you are pulling the trigger. If you do some dryfire practice and watch your sights as you pull the trigger you may see some movement of the front sight to the left. You can also see how this occurs by placing all of your fingers straight out in front of you with your thumb pointing up. Next just as you would pull the trigger move your trigger finger straight back. You will notice your middle finger tries to move with it especially on the very last part of movement. This it part of the reasons right handers shoot left and lefties shoot right. Also placement of the finger on the trigger will do this as well. Too much finger and you pull gun too little and you push it.

As for shooting low, the major problem I see with most shooters is anticipation. The moment they pull the trigger they react by trying to push muzzle down. You can really see this if you have a dummy round and have a friend load your mags. Once you get to that round your body will not know that it will fail to go off and you should see this evident.

Good news is this can easily be corrected. I recommend using some snap caps and doing dryfire training, as a lot of people here do. You will develop technique while training your muscle memory not to flinch. Plus you can help with overall skill. But you must also reinforce this with live fire as well.

Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you all.

I am sure it is the driver and not the car. I'll try finger placement or an apex trigger/GG trigger as a latch ditch. I'll also put a case on the front sight to see if I'm moving during practice.

The placement is solid. I know I would like a thicker grip, but I can't find an SC med grip frame.
 

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Just my 2 cents worth from a very new guy to the site. Jeeper808 just gave you the secret sauce for curing so many shooting issues related to accuracy. Where he mentions the dummy rounds, we call it ball and dummy, if you do this drill, it will tell you what dry fire will not. Know that when you do the drill and you "snap" on a dummy round there should be "zero" no movement from you. The only thing that moved was your trigger finger. Looking at your target I will assume that you shoot right handed. towcat made a very important point in my opinion, regarding trigger finger location. Many, but certainly not all shooters for ex. RH shooters who use the pad of their finger, push left, and low left. Finger placement is not right or wrong, it is just what works for the individual. The trick is what placement allows you to pull the trigger straight back and to the rear without disturbing sight alignment. I hope I have not over stepped with my opinion here. I am a retired LE Instructor, and hope my suggestions and the points mentioned by the other guys helps.
 

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As for shooting low, the major problem I see with most shooters is anticipation. The moment they pull the trigger they react by trying to push muzzle down. You can really see this if you have a dummy round and have a friend load your mags. Once you get to that round your body will not know that it will fail to go off and you should see this evident.

Good news is this can easily be corrected. I recommend using some snap caps and doing dryfire training, as a lot of people here do. You will develop technique while training your muscle memory not to flinch. Plus you can help with overall skill. But you must also reinforce this with live fire as well.

Hope this helps
Double ditto on what Jeeper wrote. I started using snap caps just last week, loading a few each in 4 magazines at random. I was (and still am) jerking the muzzle down at the last second, flinching and tossing rounds low. Hours of dry firing at home had me thinking I was steady, but when the real rounds are coming out of the muzzle, your body just reacts.

The snap cap drill really works.
 
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