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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Grabbed this one up today. It looks as though I bought it new in 1973. I found one slight mark on the butt of one grip. Attempted to clean it up but found little to clean. My swabs with Hoppes and light oil showed hardly anything other than the Hoppes yellow coloration.

Here are a few poor quality pictures.
 

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lamarw, beautiful "working mans" Smith... I take it that this wasn't a PD weapon, or if it was, it was discretely marked!

You find some amazing revolvers... congratulations!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for the nice comments.

Willard, There are no law enforcement markings, but I did buy it from a law enforcement distributor. It did have a hang tag stating Trade-Loudon County. I think it might be Loudon County, TN, but it could be Loudon County, VA. No telling how Loudon County came by it. If it was from their arsenal, then it must of been on the shelf for a long time.
 

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Those were the real deal for lawmen issued the .357 who carried 357 ammo.
The heavier frame made it a pleasure to shoot.
Find some pachmeyer grips and a smooth trigger.
And try to shoot the heck out of it.
 

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While the finish was meant to be a less polished, working man version, it is quite well done. Very even and smooth with a very deep blue that compares well to the finish of modern made revolvers, IMHO.


The trigger is what really does it for me. I'm not sure if they were just made better back then or time has just worn it in very nicely but the trigger is great in both DA and SA. Probably a bit of both.
 

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While the finish was meant to be a less polished, working man version, it is quite well done. Very even and smooth with a very deep blue that compares well to the finish of modern made revolvers, IMHO.


The trigger is what really does it for me. I'm not sure if they were just made better back then or time has just worn it in very nicely but the trigger is great in both DA and SA. Probably a bit of both.
It is the original "N" frame.
Even their least is excellent by today standards
 
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Why are You calling it a Model 28-2. The barrel looks like it is 4 inches.
I have a Model 28 with a 4" heavy barrel that I purchased back in August 1981.
I had two uncles that were Texas DPS Officers that carried the same one as Mine.
They told Me which model and barrel to get. It came with the Target Wood grips.
I also have the smaller wood grips plus the Pachmyr Rubber grips.
 

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Very nice, Congrats on a great find !!!

Looks like the cousin to mine that was given to me by my father. He purchased it new in 1963 or 1964 in Alaska. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes as MMinSC stated, the -2 is not descriptive of the barrel length. After S&W started using model number, the initial production was a no dash. As engineering changes occurred to the model, a dash number was used to reflect the chronological change. Therefore, the Model 28-2 reflects the revolver with engineering change number 2.

The Model 28 no dash brings a 30% premium. The Model 28-1 is very rare since there has only been one of them reported. As you can imagine, one of those would bring a substantial premium. The -2 eliminated the trigger guard screw. The -3 eliminated the pinned barrel and the cylinder counterbore. With collectors and S&W admirers, the pinned barrel and counterbore cylinders are highly desirable.

You are correct Firearms Collector, the barrel on mine is a 4".
 

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Those are great guns. I have always wanted one. I have owned a Model 19, 581, 586, 681, 686, and 65. They are beats and will take a huge amount of use.
 
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Yes as MMinSC stated, the -2 is not descriptive of the barrel length. After S&W started using model number, the initial production was a no dash. As engineering changes occurred to the model, a dash number was used to reflect the chronological change. Therefore, the Model 28-2 reflects the revolver with engineering change number 2.

The Model 28 no dash brings a 30% premium. The Model 28-1 is very rare since there has only been one of them reported. As you can imagine, one of those would bring a substantial premium. The -2 eliminated the trigger guard screw. The -3 eliminated the pinned barrel and the cylinder counterbore. With collectors and S&W admirers, the pinned barrel and counterbore cylinders are highly desirable.

You are correct Firearms Collector, the barrel on mine is a 4".
Much better explanation than mine. I had no idea the 28-1 was so rare.

Also should be mentioned that you can find a "no model #" Highway Patrolmen. These are the ones made prior to the S&W model numbering system. One that I would love to have.
 

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I had one of the 28, no dash, in 1975. Gave it to my Dad as the house gun. My sister has it now and it is a Safe Queen. (His was 6 inch barrel)

The double action on the M 27s were a little smoother because the lightened the Trigger rebound spring in the lower frame, and did a smoothing job on all of the trigger and hammer bearing surfaces. The M 27 also had a 5 inch barrel selection, where the 28 was 4 and 6 only.

IN any event, the N frame's were the "Heavy" frames built for the larger calibers (.44 special, .44 Magnum, .41 magnum, and the .357). You have a amazingly good piece of ordinance from the peek years for revolvers.
 
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