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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, this subject is back. John Farnam did an article on this in Feb of 2012.

“When the revolver fires, remaining cartridges in the cylinder (yet to be fired) are subjected to significant G-forces as the pistol recoils. Sometimes, it is enough to persuade a yet-unfired bullet to migrate forward far enough to protrude from the front of the cylinder, preventing the cylinder from rotating normally, and thus preventing the revolver from firing.

He just referred to it again in his Quips from Apr 4th.

During an exercise, shooting factory 115gr hardball from a well-known and reputable manufacturer, a bullet jumped forward far enough to protrude from the face of the cylinder and thus prevent the cylinder from rotating normally. In fact, the bullet jumped forward far enough to physically separate from the case. This not only precluded the revolver from continuing to fire, but it also made it impossible to swing-out the cylinder, so the revolver could now not be reloaded!

Check it out here.

Word!

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I must admit I've never even considered this. I'm not much of a revolver man, but this is good information to know. Ty
 

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I grew up reloading .357 Magnums and hot .44 Specials for my Dad and the rest of the family and this was pretty common knowledge back then. I guess a lot of common knowledge is getting lost as people get older.

The solution is a good crimp groove or cannelure on the bullet and a heavy roll crimp into it, plus good neck tension on the case.

I've never had a problem with this and shot a .44 Magnum Super Blackhawk weekly for a long time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I saw it during a class I was doing here years ago. First time I even heard about it. Guy was shooting reloads and I blamed it on his crimp. Turned out to be a "duh" moment for me as well.
 

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It seems unwise to have an EDC revolver that is chambered in a round normally used in an autoloader. Do any manufacturers make a 9MM round designed to be used in a revolver?
 

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It seems unwise to have an EDC revolver that is chambered in a round normally used in an autoloader. Do any manufacturers make a 9MM round designed to be used in a revolver?
Yep!
 

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I own and shoot a few big bore revolvers (41mag, 44mag, 45 Colt, 454 Casull, & 460S&W). I also own several revolvers that shoot semi auto pistol calibers (9mm, 45ACP & 10mm). I reload for all of them. It's all about the crimp and any improperly crimped ammo (revolver or semi auto) can cause problems. The hotter the load the more important the crimp is. Keep in mind, if you're having bullet jump issues in a revolver the same ammo will still have bullet jump issues in a semi auto pistol. The difference is it probably won't cause a malfunction but improperly crimped ammo can cause malfunctions in semi auto pistols, usually feeding issues.

I've never had a bullet jump issue with semi auto ammo in revolvers but I rarely shoot +P ammo in those guns. I use them mainly for plinking and fun therefore the ammo isn't hotter than average bulk factory ammo (WWB for example). If I want to get serious about power I'll shoot the traditional big bore revolvers and leave the lighter semi auto calibers for range time. The one gun that blurs the line between plinking and serious is my 10mm Blackhawk. I usually shoot factory Sig 10mm ammo in it and I've never had a problem with bullet jump. However, 10mm is usually considered to be a 'hot' caliber and I suspect Sig and other ammo manufacturers pay a bit more attention to getting an adequate crimp for their 10mm ammo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Ha yes grasshopper, some folks have not mastered the art of reloading.

Dear Hoppegrasser - you be most wise - but fail to see words spoken in link that speak of factory bullet leaving case too soon...
 
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I'm a huge big bore revolver fan. And, uh, I like those little snubbies too. And, uh, those revolvers made in unobtainium material. 310, 329, 325. Have had bullet jump in all three of these. I would never carry one of those guns for self defense. It's awesome to have a foot of flame come out the end of those things, but you'll definitely get bullet jump on those guns. Most commonly occurred with the 325 and then the 329. More aggressive with heavier bullets.

 

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Never heard of it, but then I've never been interested in revolvers that fire semi-auto rounds.

But it makes sense. It wasn't designed for a revolver.
Not enough neck tension either.

I can see revolvers in .45ACP having the issue.
I have had Blazer Brass 230 gr FMJ .45 ACP with such little neck tension that I could cause bullet setback by applying thumb pressure with the cartridge standing on a table.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Some revolvers shooting semi-auto rounds - they go back as far as WW1

Ruger LCR 9mm
Taurus 85RB 9mm
Colt 1917 .45 ACP
S&W in .40 S&W - 10mm

Any round designed for semi, can certainly have the same issue as that noted.
 

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The crimp is very important regardless of caliber or platform.

I use a taper crimp when I load 45 ACP bullets in my 45 Colt. (Revolver Only!) It works fine as long as the crimp is applied correctly and consistently.

I can definitely see some of the mass producers short-cutting a proper crimp in the name of more profit.

Good to know on the 9mm revolvers though, I didn't realize there were that many out there.
 
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