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I have a rifle that fouls so quickly and cleans with such difficulty that I am reluctant to shoot it. I have decided to try some Dyna-Tek bore coat to see if it helps, but the bore has to be cleaned to bare metal before it is applied. I have been working on getting it clean for several days, but the first few inches in front of the chamber are very resistant to cleaning. The solvent that seems to work best is CLR cleaner, it is slowly removing this "baked on" carbon, but very slowly.

Bore-Tech cu+2 copper remover does a great job on the metal fouling but their carbon cleaner will not touch the carbon.

Anyone have any tips for removing VERY stubborn carbon fouling?
 

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The solvent properties of Kano Kroil soaking in the bore for a few hours is a good beginning.
After it penetrates under the carbon ... or during this penetration of really good oil, a bronze brush (oversized of course) scrubbing from the breach end.
Even some engine type cleaners work really good. But most folks use non chlorinated brake cleaner on a bronze brush wrapped with a soaked patch.

A little effort , aka elbow grease , does a whole lot of good. “ What a difference “ after really cleaning the problematic area ! The bore finally protected with Steel Shield product , named WEAPON SHEILD , will keep the bore of the firearm easier to clean, & to allow for a manageable level of semi dirty.
 
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Some of the benchrest type guys would caution using some of the products not designed for firearms, especially if they are left in the bore for a period of time, because some barrel steels are a little, shall we say, intolerant of some chemicals.
 

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OP,
Name the fouler/maufacturer (Salvage or Ruger) I presume?
A bore guide
A 1 piece quality cleaning rod
A Pro Shot bore specific jag
Cotton/flannel patches

Wet the bore w/ Shooters Choice Mc7 bore solvent on a patch.
Since it is not of a competition barrel quality.
Bronze brush the bore from breech to muzzle.
Pulling the brush back thru the bore past the crown is your decision
Wet another patch & push it thru the bore.

Apply 320 grit silicon carbide lapping compound to a patch...sparingly.
Insert & short stroke 1/2" back & forth progressing to the muzzle.
Pull rod back to breech
Push compound patch thru bore to muzzle 1/2 dozen times.
Wet patch the bore again
Start a dry patch into the leade an couple inches.
Attempt to pull the dry patch back out of the Bbl.
If resistance is felt,you still have carbon present.
Repeat

Let the rod tell you what is going on w/ you cleaning process.

Now,a nylon brush & compound patch followed by a wet & dry patch will be required to clean the leade of any carbon donut & the chamber itself.

Shoot 50 rds thru a 50BMG (240+gr of pwder per bang)& clean the bore as new!!

All verified & in use in my 1K Prone/Comp rifles for 30+ years & verified w/ my Gradient Lens Bore Scope.

I've disposed of more snake oils from various companies over the years that Windex would put them to shame.
(I soak bullets for months in glass baby food jars to evaluate snake oils/solvents to eliminate the hype & tales)

Copper is easily removed w/ 2% ammonia.
Carbon makes diamonds in Nature
 
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So much is dependent on the barrel manufacture, since in most cases the barrel is rifled from chamber to muzzle, such as the case of button rifling as the button is pulled from breach to muzzle "forming" the rifling, "directionally". Broaches cut the rifling in the same direction, breech to muzzle. Just as projectiles move from breech to muzzle, so should the cleaning means, whether bristle bore brushes, or soft abrasives like JB Bore Cleaning Compound on patched jags, after wetting the bore with Kano Kroil, running the same direction only... breech to muzzle. It will be good in removing the carbon buildup in the throat.

To help, Brownells has what they call Double-Tuff bore brushes, that almost need to be "pulled" through the bore, used in conjunction with an Otis cleaning cable, and caliber correct VFG Felt Cleaning pellets with JB Bore Cleaning Compound, for 360 degree bore contact helps.

When you go "against the grain" or backwards you are pushing fouling into crevasses where it's then, difficult to remove.
 

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If the above suggestions don't work, try J&B bore cleaning compound. Used that and Kroil a few times to clean some pretty fouled barrels. Here's an article where a guy tried several different things and the J&B and elbow grease finally did the trick.

Carbon fouling removal

Brownells J&B

Brownells J&B Kroil Combo

I think electrolysis will remove carbon from a barrel. Years ago, Outers made a Foul Out system that worked really great according to a friend. Just googled it, and don't think it's for sale anymore. So depending on the value of the rifle, and your willingness to pay for outside help (completely understand if you want to do it yourself), might consider a gunsmith if he has an electrolysis system (and if they work on carbon fouling).
 

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To whom it may concern,
The silicon carbide oil based lapping compound that I use is a slurry like thin grease applied to a patch or pellet that Willard referenced.

Any Aluminum Oxide (sand) or Garnet (red sand) compound will quickly break down into smaller micron size particles & embed into imperfections in the bore.

A match grade,cut rifled,air gauged barrel's bore is consistent to .0001" it's entire length & is hand lapped to a 320 grit finish.

Bore scope a SigArms German P Series Bbl that is a cut rifled Bbl.
Appears to be a mirror.

Bore scope a US Sig P Series broach rifled barrel.
Yes,the bore is lapped w/o evidence of tool marks.(Lands)
No,the broach cut grooves are not lapped & show evidence of tool marks.(Grooves)

Acid & Corrosion are the only substances that will harm your barrel other than improper technique/tools to accomplish the task.


ghmj07-
I have one of the Outers Foul Out Systems that uses Lead or/or Copper Acetate liquid to remove/clean bores.
Worked well,sometimes!
But-
I could NOT get consistent end results.
 
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I am not sure as to severity of your carbon fouling....but I have a serviceable suppressor that gets quite fouled with carbon that is DIAMOND hardness. It is the toughest surface fouling I have ever experienced. I tried many methods, most were far too labor intensive, too abrasive to the baffles or both. There are many Youtube Videos that demonstrate "Electrolysis" the method of removing contaminates from the host....on a molecular level. I made my own electrolysis tool for the price of a small length of copper rod, a couple of rubber washers and a hot glue gun. It is very simple and everything comes clean with a simple tooth brushing and water. You may use a battery, multiple batteries, or almost any simple electrical transformer. I used an old phone transformer that was destined for the trash. In your case you can plug the barrel at any end with a rubber stopper, a cork or rubber foam. fill the barrel with white vinegar, or Hydrogen Peroxide or equal mix of both. insert your copper rod and let it sit overnight. The Positive Contact should be connected to the barrel and the negative should be connected to the copper rod. The copper rod must NOT touch the Barrel. the following day it should be easily cleaned with a minor brushing. I mean clean...like brand new clean. Save your soaking solution and re use it. Rinse the barrel with clean water and dry it.
It works wonders on my suppressor baffle.....unbelievable great results.
374483
 

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IZNTHESKY,
DO NOT seal the top of the container if you are using any hydrogen peroxide compound.

A piece of 308 stainless steel 1/8" diameter TIG/GTAW filler rod would serve better than a copper coated wire & easily cleaned w/ a scotch brite pad
 

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I am not sure as to severity of your carbon fouling....but I have a serviceable suppressor that gets quite fouled with carbon that is DIAMOND hardness. It is the toughest surface fouling I have ever experienced. I tried many methods, most were far too labor intensive, too abrasive to the baffles or both. There are many Youtube Videos that demonstrate "Electrolysis" the method of removing contaminates from the host....on a molecular level. I made my own electrolysis tool for the price of a small length of copper rod, a couple of rubber washers and a hot glue gun. It is very simple and everything comes clean with a simple tooth brushing and water. You may use a battery, multiple batteries, or almost any simple electrical transformer. I used an old phone transformer that was destined for the trash. In your case you can plug the barrel at any end with a rubber stopper, a cork or rubber foam. fill the barrel with white vinegar, or Hydrogen Peroxide or equal mix of both. insert your copper rod and let it sit overnight. The Positive Contact should be connected to the barrel and the negative should be connected to the copper rod. The copper rod must NOT touch the Barrel. the following day it should be easily cleaned with a minor brushing. I mean clean...like brand new clean. Save your soaking solution and re use it. Rinse the barrel with clean water and dry it.
It works wonders on my suppressor baffle.....unbelievable great results. View attachment 374483
Aren't those the same ingredients as "the dip?" I didn't think you needed electrolysis for that method. Or maybe the current speeds it up?
 

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IZNTHESKY,
DO NOT seal the top of the container if you are using any hydrogen peroxide compound.

A piece of 308 stainless steel 1/8" diameter TIG/GTAW filler rod would serve better than a copper coated wire & easily cleaned w/ a scotch brite pad
Only need to seal the bottom.....the whole purpose of this it to fill the void with solution to help remove the carbon fouling. No need to seal anything. Plus..... I can’t imagine how one would “Seal” the top.....with a negative electrode inserted into the barrel.

QUESTION: why a stainless steel rod? Is there a benefit ?

I only chose copper because it has superior conductivity to other metals without going into crazy exotic expensive metals. Plus method relies on the transfer of electrical current from positive to negative.....so conductivity is the most important factor. The copper is also easily cleaned with a scotch brute pad.

Additionally using a thinner wire allows for more solution in the barrel. ..... Iam no science major....and I don’t even know if it’s a benefit....but it works miracles for me.
 

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Aren't those the same ingredients as "the dip?" I didn't think you needed electrolysis for that method. Or maybe the current speeds it up?
I don’t know.....perhaps it will work without the electrolysis....I was desperate to learn a cleaning method for my suppressor. The carbon fouling was so severe that it was almost impossible to disassemble. When it did come apart the carbon fouling was like diamond hardness. I tried ultra-sonic.... didn’t work. I tried tumbling...it only helped on the exterior surfaces....I tried elbow grease and carbon solvent...much too difficult, messy and still can’t get into the small surface’s within the baffling. Then I saw electrolysis on the internet and I set out to attempt this method. It works miracles.
BUT.... like you said......I admit that I never tried it without the electrolysis. It may work, it might take longer....or it might not work as thorough....I have not experimented to compare the different methods.
Remember: I am no Scientist.
I do know that this method WORKS.
And it works so well that it produces results that look “factory new”. It’s cheap, easy & works. Gives me more time to enjoy life.
 

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I don’t know.....perhaps it will work without the electrolysis....I was desperate to learn a cleaning method for my suppressor. The carbon fouling was so severe that it was almost impossible to disassemble. When it did come apart the carbon fouling was like diamond hardness. I tried ultra-sonic.... didn’t work. I tried tumbling...it only helped on the exterior surfaces....I tried elbow grease and carbon solvent...much too difficult, messy and still can’t get into the small surface’s within the baffling. Then I saw electrolysis on the internet and I set out to attempt this method. It works miracles.
BUT.... like you said......I admit that I never tried it without the electrolysis. It may work, it might take longer....or it might not work as thorough....I have not experimented to compare the different methods.
Remember: I am no Scientist.
I do know that this method WORKS.
And it works so well that it produces results that look “factory new”. It’s cheap, easy & works. Gives me more time to enjoy life.
You may already know this, but be careful with the solution that's left over. From what I've read, you wind up with lead acetate which is, according to many, very dangerous. Having said that, I have a rimfire suppressor which ultrasonic and some elbow grease have worked on thus far, but it gets a little more difficult each time, so I'll be using "the dip" at some point. So far, ultrasonic with Purple Power has worked well on my stainless pistol baffles.
 

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You may already know this, but be careful with the solution that's left over. From what I've read, you wind up with lead acetate which is, according to many, very dangerous. Having said that, I have a rimfire suppressor which ultrasonic and some elbow grease have worked on thus far, but it gets a little more difficult each time, so I'll be using "the dip" at some point. So far, ultrasonic with Purple Power has worked well on my stainless pistol baffles.
Thanks....the difficulty with this one is its a one piece machined baffle. If it were multiple "cup type" baffles...I think that I would be cleaning them by hand....but this one piece has smaller unaccessible areas that are very difficult to clean by hand.
thanks on the heads up about the haz-mat.....I know that there are lot of things much more dangerous in this world than my cleaning solution. I am however, careful not to accidentally use it for other than its intended purpose....certainly not handling it without protective gloves.....or contaminating the ground with it.
I am expecting a new suppressor within the next month but for now this one is doing duty on my rimfire, my PCC, my Glock, a lever action, several of my ARs and my Bolt guns. It gets quite dirty from the Pistol the PCC and Rim fires. The rifles dont seem to foul it as much. Cleaning it is a chore that I prefer to make as simple and easy as possible. I can insert the baffle into the solution, insert the negative rod, apply the alligator clips, plug it in an leave it....while I care for my rifle. the next day....viola...it cleans easily with a toothbrush and paper towels. Never been easier !
 
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