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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’ve dealt with loctite several times before while taking apart Leatherman tools, but with a handgun I’d rather not be so haphazard with the heat gun as I have in the past.

Can someone recommend best practices for loosening red loctite so I don’t overdo it?

What temperature should the heat gun be set at?

What distance should the gun be from the surface I’m heating?

How long should I keep it there?

My guess would be around 800 degrees, 1-2 inches away while oscillating the heat instead of letting it go full force the entire time. (like working with kydex). I’d say keep at it with the heat for maybe 25-30 seconds. Thoughts?

Leatherman Charge+ Mod pics below for entertainment purposes only.








 

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I'd check with the manufacturer rather than soliciting help here. That's your safest bet.
 

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Some pinpointing of the heat source can help, in most cases a soldering pencil would work. A lot would depend on "where" the screw's threads are located. Such as grip screws in a magazine well, a clean tip bent as a 90 degree angle could access the area, around the tip of the screw through the magazine well, with the slide clamped upside down, in a padded vise, and the correct driver applying torque to the screw head. The aluminum frame should be a better conductor of the heat, than the steel screw, and expand at quicker rate, helping break the bond.
 
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Red loctite can be boiled in water to loosen it. I, however, have not yet attempted to do so with a 10/22 upper to remove some sight base screws. Pencil butane pens are another known heat source, with the part locked into a vice for quickly working the hot screw while it's movable. Any surface finish other than metal may discolor, burn, or become disfigured.

I don't think you will need more than 350F to loosen it. 800F is well above any tempering the material may have been hardened to and will cause it to go dead soft, which then increases the risk of stripping the threads exponentially.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't think you will need more than 350F to loosen it. 800F is well above any tempering the material may have been hardened to and will cause it to go dead soft, which then increases the risk of stripping the threads exponentially.

That’s a good call, however when I work with Kydex I set the heat gun to 1100 and keep the nozzle 3 inches away or so and I infrared the kydex to see that at most it’s reaching 280 degrees. Often 220 - 280 degrees depending on technique. So the heat is dissipated greatly in the process.

That’s why I’m guessing set the heat gun to 800ish. Plus, when working with an optic let’s say, I don’t want to damage anything so there’s another reason I wanted ask everyone here.

Talking to the manufacturer is a good call too.

Nonetheless, I’m here for help so all theories welcome and I appreciate the info greatly.
 

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Never had to do this but couldn’t you use a soldering iron and heat up the specific screw / nut? Use a infrared temp gun to check your progress?
 

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I’ve dealt with loctite several times before while taking apart Leatherman tools, but with a handgun I’d rather not be so haphazard with the heat gun as I have in the past.

Can someone recommend best practices for loosening red loctite so I don’t overdo it?

What temperature should the heat gun be set at?

What distance should the gun be from the surface I’m heating?

How long should I keep it there?

My guess would be around 800 degrees, 1-2 inches away while oscillating the heat instead of letting it go full force the entire time. (like working with kydex). I’d say keep at it with the heat for maybe 25-30 seconds. Thoughts?

Leatherman Charge+ Mod pics below for entertainment purposes only.








That came out really neat!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Never had to do this but couldn’t you use a soldering iron and heat up the specific screw / nut? Use a infrared temp gun to check your progress?
I keep hearing that. I’ve never used a soldering iron to heat up a screw. Everything I had heard in the past was to use a heat gun. I’m sure I’m stuck in my ways, but if everyone is fairly positive that the best practice is to use the soldering iron then it’s worth looking into on my end.
 
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