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red dot for beginners

4651 Views 60 Replies 17 Participants Last post by  RolexGMT
red dot for beginners!! Hi all, I have a question about red dots and zeroing them. I have been collecting firearms since I was 18!! I have a really nice collection and my problem is that none of them have a red dot on them! I recently bought a sig p365x with a holosun 407k-x2 and I really don't know how to zero it correctly! I was wondering if my fellow members from sig talk could help me out.. I'm not sure if I have to co witness the dot with the front sight or should I have the dot in the middle of my dot window?? I read of both ways of doing it but i'm not sure which is the best way of doing it and the easyest way of zeroing my red dot!! If I could get some direction on the correct way of zeroing my red dot I would greatly appreciate it!!! THANK YOU VERY MUCH
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There are printable targets to assist zeroing your red dot. I think Holosun has one on their site or just Google it and you'll find trainer sights that have free printable targets.
They will have a POA/POI at a specific distance.
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I would get to the basic by using Laser bore to zero-in at home
and go to range to fine tune it ..
I like Sig RomeoZero Elite .. Very clear red reticle + reasonable price
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Read the instructions. To get close without a bore sight laser line up the iron sights at about 5-10 yards - unloaded - and adjust the dot to sit right on top of the from sight. It should get it close.

Rest the pistol on a sandbag or hard surface to do this, then shoot 3-round groups and adjust accordingly. I zero mine at 10-15 yards.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
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PS: After you get it zeroed give yourself plenty of dry fire practice to bring the dot up to your dominate eye and keep both eyes open and on your target.

Finding the dot and getting it on target from the draw or low ready is the single biggest obstacle new dot-users have to overcome, especially for those who have been shooting irons one-eyed for years.

Lots of people give up because it seems to take so long to get it down. It's a steep learning curve.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
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Lets begin at the beginning.

Can you ‘shoot a group’? How many rounds do you feel comfortable? At what distance? How big is the group?

For example, can say you shoot five rounds at 10 yards into a 4” circle, with no time limit?
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I site the dot In usually use a rest to get the best results
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Assuming your P365X is setup the same way as mine with it's Romeo Zero, you want to have the dot in the center of the window, ignoring the front sight, and adjust it until the shots and the dot are in the same place. Your 407k does have a notch in it like my Romeo Zero, but it really is not intended to be used as a rear sight, only to allow you to use a rear sight if it were still attached to the frame and high enough to be seen.

Where things can get kind of confusing is if you can clearly see the front and rear sights, and they are usable through the window. In this case, you can align the iron sights and adjust the dot until it is also in alignment with them as a starting point. The dot will be at the bottom of the window when in alignment with the iron sights, but when you go to shoot the thing, ignore the iron sights and put the dot back in the center of the window and on the target. If you look closely with the dot in the center, you'll see the iron sights will show you are aiming high, which will match up with where the dot, that is now above the front sight, is indicating as where you are aiming.

From there you can start learning how to use the optic. When switching from iron sights it does take some practice to be able to get the dot in the window fast and not be searching for it, but in the end, IMHO, it's worth the effort.
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I would get to the basic by using Laser bore to zero-in at home
and go to range to fine tune it ..
I like Sig RomeoZero Elite .. Very clear red reticle + reasonable price
Thank you very much for your help!!! Connecticut
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Lets begin at the beginning.

Can you ‘shoot a group’? How many rounds do you feel comfortable? At what distance? How big is the group?

For example, can say you shoot five rounds at 10 yards into a 4” circle, with no time limit?
I could should a group with my iron sites in a 3-4 inch circle at 15-20 yards with not a problem! Are you talking about with my iron sites or my red dot? When I shoot w my red dot its usually a little low and to the left a bit! It said in the directions of my Holosun that the red dot was zeroed at the manufacturer so I really don't know how accurate it really is so i'm not sure how to adjust??
PS: After you get it zeroed give yourself plenty of dry fire practice to bring the dot up to your dominate eye and keep both eyes open and on your target.

Finding the dot and getting it on target from the draw or low ready is the single biggest obstacle new dot-users have to overcome, especially for those who have been shooting irons one-eyed for years.

Lots of people give up because it seems to take so long to get it down. It's a steep learning curve.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
Thank you for your information that will help me to get use to the red dot and not waste ammo doing so
There are printable targets to assist zeroing your red dot. I think Holosun has one on their site or just Google it and you'll find trainer sights that have free printable targets.
They will have a POA/POI at a specific distance.
Great idea I didn't even think about that. Thank you for yr help
Read the instructions. To get close without a bore sight laser line up the iron sights at about 5-10 yards - unloaded - and adjust the dot to sit right on top of the from sight. It should get it close.

Rest the pistol on a sandbag or hard surface to do this, then shoot 3-round groups and adjust accordingly. I zero mine at 10-15 yards.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
awesome thanks
I could should a group with my iron sites in a 3-4 inch circle at 15-20 yards with not a problem! Are you talking about with my iron sites or my red dot? When I shoot w my red dot its usually a little low and to the left a bit! It said in the directions of my Holosun that the red dot was zeroed at the manufacturer so I really don't know how accurate it really is so i'm not sure how to adjust??
You'll need to zero once it's mounted to the gun. From the factory it's not dead on accurate, just pretty close.

Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk
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i just zero to where i am hitting, regardless of iron sights or "co-witness" options.

one tip i would give is to not "look for the dot" when you are presenting, and don't steer the gun around to get the dot to appear as you are drawing or bringing it into your sight picture.
present the gun the same way you have done countless times before with iron sights and the dot should be there. it will be there.
your existing muscle memory is your friend.
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I could should a group with my iron sites in a 3-4 inch circle at 15-20 yards with not a problem! Are you talking about with my iron sites or my red dot? When I shoot w my red dot its usually a little low and to the left a bit! It said in the directions of my Holosun that the red dot was zeroed at the manufacturer so I really don't know how accurate it really is so i'm not sure how to adjust??
Ok, very good. Let’s use that as a bench mark — a 4” circle at 15 yards.

Step one is thus set up a target at 15 yards. It can be a circle, or two thick crossed lines drawn on graph paper, as long as it’s got something to aim at, Get your black sharpie and put a black 1/2” ‘dot’ in the center.

Run it out to 15 yards. Get a shooting rest, or if you don’t have a rest, a .30 cal ammo can and fold up a towel will work. Put your forearms on the rest. Look down the sight, and place the red dot directly over the sharpie dot on the target. With your best grip evar, press off a clean, crisp shot. DO NOT LOOK WHERE THE BULLET WENT AT THIS TIME.

Rest a bit, then repeat this four more times, until you have five shots.

Now run the target in. Using a pen, connect the five rounds together with your sharpie, making a five pointed ‘figure’. It’s less than 4”, right? Mentally aggregate where the ‘center’ of your group is, that you shot, and put another dot there with your sharpie to mark the center of ‘your‘ group. If this isn’t at center of the target, you have some work to do with the sight, but let’s worry about that in a minute,

Are you with me so far?
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i just zero to where i am hitting, regardless of iron sights or "co-witness" options.

one tip i would give is to not "look for the dot" when you are presenting, and don't steer the gun around to get the dot to appear as you are drawing or bringing it into your sight picture.
present the gun the same way you have done countless times before with iron sights and the dot should be there. it will be there.
your existing muscle memory is your friend.
Awesome response I really appreciate you sharing yr knowledge with me!!! That is something you don't forget! Thank you
Ok, very good. Let’s use that as a bench mark — a 4” circle at 15 yards.

Step one is thus set up a target at 15 yards. It can be a circle, or two thick crossed lines drawn on graph paper, as long as it’s got something to aim at, Get your black sharpie and put a black 1/2” ‘dot’ in the center.

Run it out to 15 yards. Get a shooting rest, or if you don’t have a rest, a .30 cal ammo can and fold up a towel will work. Put your forearms on the rest. Look down the sight, and place the red dot directly over the sharpie dot on the target. With your best grip evar, press off a clean, crisp shot. DO NOT LOOK WHERE THE BULLET WENT AT THIS TIME.

Rest a bit, then repeat this four more times, until you have five shots.

Now run the target in. Using a pen, connect the five rounds together with your sharpie, making a five pointed ‘figure’. It’s less than 4”, right? Mentally aggregate where the ‘center’ of your group is, that you shot, and put another dot there with your sharpie to mark the center of ‘your‘ group. If this isn’t at center of the target, you have some work to do with the sight, but let’s worry about that in a minute,

Are you with me so far?
yes sir!!
I bought a 9 mm bore laser to sight in the red dot. I put the gun in a vice to hold it still, marked the bore laser projection on the wall (at your preferred distance), then adjusted the red dot onto that same spot. You have to mark the laser impact point because the laser light is not visible through the red dot window. Anyway, this method has gotten me dead on when shooting, certainly more accurate than my shooting technique can achieve.
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Assuming your P365X is setup the same way as mine with it's Romeo Zero, you want to have the dot in the center of the window, ignoring the front sight, and adjust it until the shots and the dot are in the same place. Your 407k does have a notch in it like my Romeo Zero, but it really is not intended to be used as a rear sight, only to allow you to use a rear sight if it were still attached to the frame and high enough to be seen.

Where things can get kind of confusing is if you can clearly see the front and rear sights, and they are usable through the window. In this case, you can align the iron sights and adjust the dot until it is also in alignment with them as a starting point. The dot will be at the bottom of the window when in alignment with the iron sights, but when you go to shoot the thing, ignore the iron sights and put the dot back in the center of the window and on the target. If you look closely with the dot in the center, you'll see the iron sights will show you are aiming high, which will match up with where the dot, that is now above the front sight, is indicating as where you are aiming.

From there you can start learning how to use the optic. When switching from iron sights it does take some practice to be able to get the dot in the window fast and not be searching for it, but in the end, IMHO, it's worth the effort.
It seems to me when I have my red dot on a particular site and I try to co witness it with my red dot and my iron sites the gun is pointing in a downward position, when I put my red dot to the middle of the glass it seems to be in a much better position and pretty close to the POA that i'm staring at!! Is that good or bad???
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