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While Parkerizing has been around a lot longer than many of the newer, more modern firearms finishes, a lot of younger shooters might not understand how it "works" so to speak. Parkerizing is different than most all of the newer, more modern firearms finishes on the market today, in that it offers very little protection on it's own.

Parkerizing itself is only a media for holding oil near the steel itself. Thereby allowing the oil to protect the firearm steel from rust. Parkerizing left dry and free from oil offers almost no protection in the way of rustproofing. It requires oil to be effective. The question then becomes how much, and how often?

This is a matter of personal preference and location. Also if the gun is carried in a leather holster or not. If the gun is exposed to high levels of rain or humidity, or stored in a leather holster, it will require more and heavier oiling than if it's contained in a Nylon type of holster in a dry, desert climate.

Through the years I have found the best way to initially treat Parkerizing, is to oil it very heavily, and allow it to "soak in" overnight. Then, with a absorbent cloth, or a paper towel, blot up as much of the excess oil as possible. Don't wipe or scrub the surface because it will transfer lint like crazy, because of the Parkerizing's naturally rough surface. If you live in a humid climate you will want to repeat this process often to be sure the surface of the Parkerizing itself has oil contained in it. Oil saturated Parkerizing has a darker color to it. Dry Parkerizing has a more greyish cast. Below is a picture of my Springfield Loaded Parkerized 1911 pistol. You can clearly see the surface is wet with oil. A Parkerized firearm in this condition will all but never rust.

Parkerizing requires more maintenance, but properly cared for it will serve it's purpose well.

 

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As billt mentioned, this process has been around for some time, Sig even uses it for internal components in their military models, and military type models such as the M11A1, Mk25, and Combat models, calling it a "Corrosion Resistant Internal Coating". Military use has been since just prior to World War 2, here in the US. Prior to that bluing was used. There are basically 2 current compounds used for this, zinc phosphate, and manganese phosphate. Both result in a grayish color ranging from light gray to almost black. Reportedly, the manganese phosphate can be dipped into an oil bath, IIRC of Quaker State motor oil, after the phosphate bath, which will give it a greenish hue. I have a Remington M1903A3, whose receiver has this coloration in natural light, and a later Springfield Armory M1 Garand 1140XXX serial # that has tinges of green...
 
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As billt mentioned, this process has been around for some time, Sig even uses it for internal components in their military models, and military type models such as the M11A1, Mk25, and Combat models, calling it a "Corrosion Resistant Internal Coating". Military use has been since just prior to World War 2, here in the US. Prior to that bluing was used. There are basically 2 current compounds used for this, zinc phosphate, and manganese phosphate. Both result in a grayish color ranging from light gray to almost black. Reportedly, the manganese phosphate can be dipped into an oil bath, IIRC of Quaker State motor oil, after the phosphate bath, which will give it a greenish hue. I have a Remington M1903A3, whose receiver has this coloration in natural light, and a later Springfield Armory M1 Garand 1140XXX serial # that has tinges of green...
The internals of M11-A1 and MK25 are phosphate coated.

Please tell me its not the same as Parkerizing! Reason being is I run my mags really dry.
 

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I have two Parkerized model 1911s. I wipe on a light coating of Remoil every time I clean them. I use a linen cloth and have not had problems with the surface retaining lint.
 

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Never owned or would own a Park finished weapon, I just don't like it, not a big fan of Blued guns either although the old Colts were gorgeous.
If I were ever to buy something that was parkerized I would send it out to be refinished. :cool:
 

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The internals of M11-A1 and MK25 are phosphate coated.

Please tell me its not the same as Parkerizing! Reason being is I run my mags really dry.
I have been proven wrong on my assumptions before... but in this case, I believe it is because Parkerizing is just another name for phosphatizing... Wipe both the "inside" and "outside" of your magazines down also, whether they are "matte" (parkerized), or "polished" (blued). They don't need to be "wet"... use CLP, and a light coat... let it set for a few minutes and wipe off with a dry cloth. The follower is synthetic, and can operate without lubricant, which attracts dust and dirt creating "crud". You just want to "seal" the microscopic "pores" from moisture. The same holds true for the internal components of the pistol.
 
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