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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning an improvement to my recently purchased,(used) P232 in .380 for the purpose of preventing the breakage of the takedown lever described in various web postings. "BrowningsGhost" posted on some excessive slide wear that I seem to be well on my way to also experiencing.

The plan is to purchase the Wolff calibration spring set, and install the 18 lb recoil spring (15 lb is stock spring weight) with the hope of reducing what seems to be overly harsh contact between the slide and slide stop at the rear of slide travel.

My thinking is that the broken takedown levers may be the result of damage to the lever/pin assy caused by the hammering of slide to slide stop due to lack of spring force to slow the slide near end of travel. After my last practice outing (about 60 rounds) I found the takedown lever impossible to turn completely in the vertical position without working it back and forth a few times. Cleaning after disassembly didn't seem to help much, only after the lever was worked maybe 20 times was it reasonably easy to operate it to full takedown position. It still resists near end of travel a bit. Also noticed wear on the frame at the point that the slide stop rests against it, to the point of removal of the finish/coating used. (See Pics)

If someone has dealt with this or slide dynamics in general, I would Greatly appreciate your opinions! I really really enjoy this pistol!, and would like to solve this rather than off it and move on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Update, still working on it....

So I've installed the 18 lb Wollf spring and the gun seems to run well with it.Only 1 failure to feed in about 120 rounds, thats what I experienced with the original spring using the reloads from my local range. After this last outing I again had to deal with the nearly frozen in place takedown lever though. After working it loose a bit I tried some cleaning in that area, specifically the detent spring and plunger under the slide stop. Lighter fluid and some working of the lever freed it up faster than anything else I'd tried so far, but it is still pretty stiff approaching the full takedown position. At this point I'm pretty sure the seized lever problem is the result of powder residue collecting in the bore that houses the spring and detent pin for the slide stop. I added a glob of grease to the underside of the stop as a barrier to dirt entry into the bore. Has anyone removed the slide stop and pin on one of these? Id like to do a thorough clean-out of the detent spring bore.
 

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If I remember right sig had quite a few problems with the take down levers on the 232. Thinking they were manufactured around 2013. Do a search on the forum and see what you can dig up. I have one that was manufactured around 2006 and have never had an issue. Good luck!
 

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Has anyone removed the slide stop and pin on one of these? Id like to do a thorough clean-out of the detent spring bore.
I've never removed one (don't even own a 232), but Chris Orndorff demonstrates the procedure in the CWWeapons SIG Sauer Armorer's Course DVD.

It looks to be a bit of a PITA, IMHO. If I were having a problem with the lever and attempting the disassembly, I'd have a replacement spring and detent pin ready to install when putting it all back together.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've never removed one (don't even own a 232), but Chris Orndorff demonstrates the procedure in the CWWeapons SIG Sauer Armorer's Course DVD.

It looks to be a bit of a PITA, IMHO. If I were having a problem with the lever and attempting the disassembly, I'd have a replacement spring and detent pin ready to install when putting it all back together.
Good point! This would be the time to replace the highly suspect lever & stop also.
 

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Dawg, did you ever figure it out or fix it? I ran into the same issue with the play in the takedown lever. I never had it drop vertical while shoot causing the slide to slam into the stop and cause damage, as it sounds you did. But I did have the issue of the lever being able to rotate without the shaft of the takedown lever spinning. The poorly designed, two piece, press-fit lever can drop on its own. I ended up drilling two small divots (where you would/could stake the two pieces) and blipped it with my welder. It’s not very pretty at the moment. Too my to test it out tomorrow at the range. Then I’ll continue smoothing it out and hopefully blue it.
 

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Dawg, did you ever figure it out or fix it? I ran into the same issue with the play in the takedown lever. I never had it drop vertical while shoot causing the slide to slam into the stop and cause damage, as it sounds you did. But I did have the issue of the lever being able to rotate without the shaft of the takedown lever spinning. The poorly designed, two piece, press-fit lever can drop on its own. I ended up drilling two small divots (where you would/could stake the two pieces) and blipped it with my welder. It’s not very pretty at the moment. Too my to test it out tomorrow at the range. Then I’ll continue smoothing it out and hopefully blue it.

As you have witnessed-
Any SIG take down lever w/ the button headed rivet ,is actually a stud that was button riveted (punch press) to assemble the lever to the take down part.

There is NOT any key provision to index the lever to the stud to eliminate rotational variances before, during or after the thumb lever is pressed/riveted to the take down part.

I have restaked & precision TIG welded several Classic P series take down levers.
(fyi-the bbl lug flat to thumb lever configuration is NOT set at 90degrees or the aft end of the thumb lever will drag against the slide.)
 
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