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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Greetings!

I believe it is standard for the current SRT 226 triggers to break like glass, I was wondering if there are people that prefer the Rolling Break Trigger (where it's just a constant pressure all the way through and a somewhat unpredictable, surprise break without a perceivable "wall"). Well technically, it's not really unpredictable, it always breaks at the same length but doesn't have a stiff wall you have to "break through" like that of a normal crisp "glass rod" break. It's as if the sear just rolls off rather than snaps/breaks through the wall in a sudden impact which may be perceived to making the sights bounce as opposed to a constant smooth roll. I believe some consider this the "european break" or the old-timer's bullseye trigger job. If you do have a rolling break trigger on your 226 (with SRT), what did you do to achieve that?

I worked on my tacops and it has a very un-gritty pull in SA. about 3.8-3.9lbs, just a .5 decrease after just polishing. I did however got to try and polish out an older 226 that doesn't have a short reach trigger and short reset trigger (I don't know if this matters", and it had a very smooth rolling break. I don't exactly remember what I did and I no longer have that unit to check out. I'm not sure if I also tinkered with the sear hook and hammer hook itself through the polishing. If you have images of your 226 components that exhibit a "rolling break" please do kindly attach them so we can see the difference.

Please correct me if I'm wrong, but if I were to guess it would be with regards to how "square" the angle of the sear is to the hammer?

I know it's a bit hard to explain and get a grasp of through text, so here's a vid I saw some time ago. I know it's a Glock, but it's the only one I can find that shows the difference.

Thanks
 

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I understand crisp/glass rod. But, the roll sounds like either a ton of creep or a striker or double action pull.
Then, there's also take up, the slack you have before you reach the wall. Imo, a non striker pistol should break like a glass rod. And have not much take up at all.
And every new Sig pistol I've pulled the trigger on has had a lot of creep. However, a good smith can eliminate creep and get rid of a lot of the take up.
So, I'll take the not much take up and break like a glass rod every time.
Robert Burke, The Sig Armorer has spoiled me rotten on that score.
 

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Remember, the European break was designed for people who are afraid that a gun will actually go off.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I understand crisp/glass rod. But, the roll sounds like either a ton of creep or a striker or double action pull.
Then, there's also take up, the slack you have before you reach the wall. Imo, a non striker pistol should break like a glass rod. And have not much take up at all.
And every new Sig pistol I've pulled the trigger on has had a lot of creep. However, a good smith can eliminate creep and get rid of a lot of the take up.
So, I'll take the not much take up and break like a glass rod every time.
Robert Burke, The Sig Armorer has spoiled me rotten on that score.
I guess I just don't understand the roll - European break.
Yeah its somewhat like a striker pull, but without the grittiness and stacking. Its supposed to be very smooth and usually light so it's like just normal takeup. However it breaks without additional sudden pressure so it keeps your muzzle from bouncing per pull through the break of the wall. Don't get me wrong, a trigger that breaks like glass is great but then based on from what I've felt, a smooth rolling trigger where the movement is practically as soft and smooth as take up with a somewhat sudden and unpredictable break feels great too. There is no sudden jolt whatsoever. I believe even a smooth rolling trigger can break crisply but its just that the pressure needed to break the trigger is gradual and not aimed to just "break a wall". I guess this may be why the Europeans, bullseye shooters like Brian Zins and I heard, even Rob Leatham like it.

I don't know but my sig doesn't have much, if any creep. Creep is like where its already the wall but its still inching past that wall without breaking if I remember correctly. Take up there's always that as long as there is no pretravel adjustable trigger for DA and a cam on SA.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I like a crisp trigger break. It's what I'm used to.
I like it fine too, I'm just curious as to how do the rolling triggers are achieved and it feels pretty good too if done right. I did have to somewhat change up how I pull the trigger given the somewhat stiff but crisp wall. I find that my old method of using the pad of the finger, the fat somewhat gets a squishy feel and sometimes made for some jolts of the muzzle up and to the right.. I tried changing it up to using the first joint of the finger as the joint is quite sturdy and stable and it allowed for consistent straight pulls everytime without any flinch. I don't know if it's just me though.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Remember, the European break was designed for people who are afraid that a gun will actually go off.
That's interesting to find out. If the break of the trigger while rolling is quite a hefty weight, then I guess that why they prefer it. But through what I noticed, smithed rolling triggers are often lighter than glass-rod triggers so they may catch a shooter more off-guard of when the gun would go bang.
 
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