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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Greetings,

I'm currently planning to get a P226 enhance elite for competition.

I was originally looking for a P226 tacops chambered in 9mm due to the 4 20rd mags it comes with but I could get a P226 enhanced elite for almost 2/3 the price. It's chambered in .40 however. I know some can master .40 just fine and wanted to ask the tips and tricks to shooting .40 after being a 9mm (glock 19c austria) and .45 (p14) hi cap shooter. I've shot some older w. germany sigs and love the function. Also got some range time on an enhanced elite chambered in .40 and found it to be great for plinking but never got the chance to think about competing with it.

Where I'm located SIG's are usually twice the SRP of that in the States. the tacops is about 1800usd, while the 40 enhanced elite is 1200usd (from a different store). There's no available 9mm enhanced elite for the same price, the only available 9mm enhanced elites are practically the same price as the tacops and if that were the case I don't think it's wise to not go for the tacops.

Mec-gar mags are about 75usd each too so I'll have to add that on to the cost. 4 additionals would add up to 300usd. Adding it to the gun itself makes the bill to about 1500usd. A good 300usd difference for more range time and some upgrades I guess.

E2 grips are a pleasure for me though I can hold the normal grips just fine. I was also thinking that the magwell grips on the tacops would be a no-no for USPSA so that would just end up with me changing them out. Enhanced elite also seems to be way easier to CC.

One of my main gripes about it apart from controlling the recoil snapback is the mag sizes. I'm thinking about getting mec-gar 15rd extended mags, but figured that with the extended mags I'll be about 1/8 of an inch over the box size for competition. Would using a dremel tool work? I would really like to have that 15+1 given IPSC production rules and wouldn't want a handicapped mag capacity with a 13+1 mec-gar or the 12+1 standard. Would fabricating a aluminum base plate be a better option?

First upgrade I'd probably do is an 18lb hammer spring too to lower that DA pull. SRT is really what I'm after, the reset is just beautiful. If there are any other ideas on how to make that DA/SA lighter, maybe to less than 8lbs and 3~lbs respectively, that would be great. I've been hearing great things even until a 17lb hammer spring, but it will be carried sometimes and I guess the slightly heavier poundage is better? Any thoughts? Also, to clarify, the part is mainspring 1?

Also would like to ask thoughts on a short reach trigger vs the fat trigger. Only ever got the chance to use the fat triggers, wasn't able to feel the short reach ones.

Any input would be greatly appreciated. Much thanks!
 

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In any competition its about how fast you can return to target and shoot. If your shooting 40 against 9mm owners you have a disadvantage. You can reload lighter but you still need to meet or beat power factors.

You can buy the 40 and get a 9 convertion barrel.. but that would negate your 40 savings..
 

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Welcome to Sig Talk, from the southwest corner of the State of Indiana, in the United States.

As KenBry stated, you can convert to 9mm, with just a barrel, and recoil spring, and for a P226, you can use a OEM barrel. You can use the .357/.40 magazines, but you can also get the high capacity 9mm P226 magazines you originally wanted. Your sights may be off, but for competition, you would probably use adjustable sights anyway.

As far as triggers, it would depend on the size of your hand. The Short Reach Trigger, shouldn't be confused with the Short Reset Trigger. The Short Reach Trigger helps those with smaller hands or short fingers, reach the trigger comfortably. There are "Flat", and "Curved", adjustable triggers, which can be adjusted to remove "take-up" and "over-travel" distances to a minimum. The Short Reset Trigger, just reduces the amount of "let off" before the sear resets for the next shot in single action mode.
The "shape" of the trigger would be a personal preference!

As far as "mainsprings" are concerned, the factory mainspring, which should be Mainspring-1, would run according to Wolff Gunsprings, about 21# for the newer models, as the older German models ran closer to 24#, with the metal mainspring seats. Use of 17# would make only the double action trigger pull a little lighter, at the expense of possible light hammer strikes. It depends on how sensitive you ammunition primers are, whether you should go this low. A 19# mainspring will give you a slightly "lighter" double action pull, making sure you grease the Trigger Bar, where it contacts the frame, and "dry firing" with a "snap cap" will help smooth out the trigger. Single action trigger pull is normally a function of the hammer/sear interface and angle. Once again, a little grease in the right places can work miracles!

Being in the Philippines, I'm not sure how hard it is for you to get parts, but good luck!
 
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i don't own a .40, but have shot them.
is it harder to shoot quickly and accurately, yes.
prohibitively so? i would say no for home defense, but i would not choose one for competition unless i already knew i was just as good as with a 9mm.

i have not tried other triggers (main weapon is a 9mm enhanced elite) so i cannot help there.
 
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I don't shoot competition but own a mix of 9mm and .40. All costs equal I would choose 9mm. If the price premium you pay for guns is also applicable to ammo I suspect your "savings" would be consumed by extra cost for .40 ammo.

Look at your year 1 and 2 cost to see what gun and potential caliber conversion barrel provides the best value.
 

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I would go with the tacops in 9mm for competition.

I echo Willard with reference to the mainspring.

I personally do not really care for the short reach trigger. I have it on my M11-A1 until I replace one of my other triggers to a flat trigger.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
In any competition its about how fast you can return to target and shoot. If your shooting 40 against 9mm owners you have a disadvantage. You can reload lighter but you still need to meet or beat power factors.

You can buy the 40 and get a 9 convertion barrel.. but that would negate your 40 savings..
Yup my sentiments too, the down time on muzzle flip makes me think twice about it even if I practice a lot. Savings will surely be negated as it’s an expensive sport but then paying for everything on one go hurts the wallet a bit more than paying it in somewhat a “staggared” way. Sadly conversion barrels would just mean I would need to register it as another firearm albeit not being a dedicated pistol. Gun laws here are quite cumbersome
 

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Yup my sentiments too, the down time on muzzle flip makes me think twice about it even if I practice a lot. Savings will surely be negated as it’s an expensive sport but then paying for everything on one go hurts the wallet a bit more than paying it in somewhat a “staggared” way. Sadly conversion barrels would just mean I would need to register it as another firearm albeit not being a dedicated pistol. Gun laws here are quite cumbersome
how do you register a slide assy? there is no serial # on them here.
not doubting since you live outside the US, but just asking.
are the slides for guns there also stamped?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yup my sentiments too, the down time on muzzle flip makes me think twice about it even if I practice a lot. Savings will surely be negated as it’s an expensive sport but then paying for everything on one go hurts the wallet a bit more than paying it in somewhat a “staggared” way. Sadly conversion barrels would just mean I would need to register it as another firearm albeit not being a dedicated pistol. Gun laws here are quite cumbersome
how do you register a slide assy? there is no serial # on them here.
not doubting since you live outside the US, but just asking.
are the slides for guns there also stamped?
It’s so stupid tbh. Slides are not stamped but you register the same serial on a different caliber and I believe there should be an attached certification of a registered gunsmith that that registration is not a fake and that there is a conversion barrel involved.

Even cmmg 22 conversion kits for 5.56 ar15 style rifles should theoretically have the same procedure, its nuts
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Welcome to Sig Talk, from the southwest corner of the State of Indiana, in the United States.

As KenBry stated, you can convert to 9mm, with just a barrel, and recoil spring, and for a P226, you can use a OEM barrel. You can use the .357/.40 magazines, but you can also get the high capacity 9mm P226 magazines you originally wanted. Your sights may be off, but for competition, you would probably use adjustable sights anyway.

As far as triggers, it would depend on the size of your hand. The Short Reach Trigger, shouldn't be confused with the Short Reset Trigger. The Short Reach Trigger helps those with smaller hands or short fingers, reach the trigger comfortably. There are "Flat", and "Curved", adjustable triggers, which can be adjusted to remove "take-up" and "over-travel" distances to a minimum. The Short Reset Trigger, just reduces the amount of "let off" before the sear resets for the next shot in single action mode.
The "shape" of the trigger would be a personal preference!

As far as "mainsprings" are concerned, the factory mainspring, which should be Mainspring-1, would run according to Wolff Gunsprings, about 21# for the newer models, as the older German models ran closer to 24#, with the metal mainspring seats. Use of 17# would make only the double action trigger pull a little lighter, at the expense of possible light hammer strikes. It depends on how sensitive you ammunition primers are, whether you should go this low. A 19# mainspring will give you a slightly "lighter" double action pull, making sure you grease the Trigger Bar, where it contacts the frame, and "dry firing" with a "snap cap" will help smooth out the trigger. Single action trigger pull is normally a function of the hammer/sear interface and angle. Once again, a little grease in the right places can work miracles!

Being in the Philippines, I'm not sure how hard it is for you to get parts, but good luck!
Firstly, I would like to thank you for your very informative post!

Small parts shouldn’t be too hard but bigger parts would most definitely catch the eye of our customs.
Barrels are rarely sold and registration will be a b*tch despite that being my first option if ever. Damn, makes me jealous of what you guys have state side.

The srt I meant was the reset, as for the reach my hand span is approximately 9 inches across, my fingers aren’t particularly too long but aren’t short either. My concern is that if there’s a stickler range officer I may not be allowed to shoot production due to the different trigger.

For pull, I’m somewhat handy that I got to polish some trigger bars before to remove that gritty feeling. Though, I do think that maybe dry firing with snap caps just help “break in” the firearm just as well.
Maybe an 18# spring would be a good median between the 17 and 19? So that I can alleviate some apprehensions about light strikes but still have a lighter pull?

I always thought that the mainspring would help even the SA pull, not as much as the DA I think but doesn’t it?

Thank you for all your input it’s great to be able to learn a lot more about the firearm like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
i don't own a .40, but have shot them.
is it harder to shoot quickly and accurately, yes.
prohibitively so? i would say no for home defense, but i would not choose one for competition unless i already knew i was just as good as with a 9mm.

i have not tried other triggers (main weapon is a 9mm enhanced elite) so i cannot help there.
Your opinion is already of great help man. More input the better! Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I don't shoot competition but own a mix of 9mm and .40. All costs equal I would choose 9mm. If the price premium you pay for guns is also applicable to ammo I suspect your "savings" would be consumed by extra cost for .40 ammo.

Look at your year 1 and 2 cost to see what gun and potential caliber conversion barrel provides the best value.
If only there were a 9 for the same price! I’m slightly hoping that the .40 I’m looking at gets sold as it’s the last unit left so I wouldn’t feel guilty about taking the tacops since I’m practically forced to. I have a bigger stock pile of 9mm and only have about a couple hundred of .40 from a usp my dad had a decade ago. Price difference in buying shells are negligible but the life of the shells is what I can’t quantify. I computer that I may have to shoot about 7k rounds for the costs of both the tacops and 40 to be equal.

Sadly conversion kits aren’t that much of an option, though I really wish they were!

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I would go with the tacops in 9mm for competition.

I echo Willard with reference to the mainspring.

I personally do not really care for the short reach trigger. I have it on my M11-A1 until I replace one of my other triggers to a flat trigger.
How’s the flat trigger for you? I’m thinking about getting an adjustable trigger but then I’m not too sure if that may push me to open class.

If it was solely for carry, maybe a 229 in 40 would be great. But then life is filled with hard decisions I guess lol
 

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I'm FAR from an expert, but here's my take.
It's sort of like golf. You can chase the leader board, but you're really only competing against yourself.
I use a 40 for competition, but I never had the intention of competing against the 9mm guys. I use my 40 to get better/faster with MY gun. I also shoot limited major which gives a tiny advantage of power factor, but again, I'm really only competing with myself. If I wanted to seriously contend with the really tough competitors, I would use 9mm.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm FAR from an expert, but here's my take.
It's sort of like golf. You can chase the leader board, but you're really only competing against yourself.
I use a 40 for competition, but I never had the intention of competing against the 9mm guys. I use my 40 to get better/faster with MY gun. I also shoot limited major which gives a tiny advantage of power factor, but again, I'm really only competing with myself. If I wanted to seriously contend with the really tough competitors, I would use 9mm.
Thanks for the input, I also always thought that if I were to go .40, limited major would benefit me more. Thanks again!
 
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