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I don't like DAK, but I can explain. DAK is intended to address a common operator error with DAO. The long travel of DAO is an advantage under stressful situations because it minimizes the chances of an accidental discharge. But the long reset of DAO is a disadvantage under stressful situations if the operator intends to continue shooting but fails to allow the trigger to come forward far enough to reset (short stroking the trigger). That's where DAK comes in. The trigger has two resets. The first is the standard reset where the trigger is allowed to come forward all the way (just like DAO). The second is the intermediate reset where the trigger is only allowed to come forward part of the way (almost like SA). The weapon can be fired from this position but it will be an even heavier trigger pull than from the full forward position. If the trigger is released past the intermediate reset, it will return to the full forward position on its own. The idea is to shoot DAK exactly like you would shoot DAO. But if you mess up by short-stroking the trigger, the gun will still be able to fire as long as you have let the trigger travel to at least the intermediate reset point.
Excellent explanation. I recently picked up a NIB P229 DAK in 40 just for the fun of it. Paid $500 OTD so not too worried about not liking it. DAK is the only Sig configuration I’ve never fired so will be interesting. Will report back with impressions after some range time with her.
 

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I don't like DAK, but I can explain. DAK is intended to address a common operator error with DAO. The long travel of DAO is an advantage under stressful situations because it minimizes the chances of an accidental discharge. But the long reset of DAO is a disadvantage under stressful situations if the operator intends to continue shooting but fails to allow the trigger to come forward far enough to reset (short stroking the trigger). That's where DAK comes in. The trigger has two resets. The first is the standard reset where the trigger is allowed to come forward all the way (just like DAO). The second is the intermediate reset where the trigger is only allowed to come forward part of the way (almost like SA). The weapon can be fired from this position but it will be an even heavier trigger pull than from the full forward position. If the trigger is released past the intermediate reset, it will return to the full forward position on its own. The idea is to shoot DAK exactly like you would shoot DAO. But if you mess up by short-stroking the trigger, the gun will still be able to fire as long as you have let the trigger travel to at least the intermediate reset point.
I am familiar with the DAK trigger, but I agree with another's comment that this was (by far) the best description that I've seen. Although my six Sigs are DA/SA, my three HKs are LEM. I wanted to the platforms consistent with each brand.
 

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I am familiar with the DAK trigger, but I agree with another's comment that this was (by far) the best description that I've seen. Although my six Sigs are DA/SA, my three HKs are LEM. I wanted to the platforms consistent with each brand.
Thanks. I suppose an operator could also intentionally use the DAK intermediate reset function as a pseudo-SA trigger pull. It isn't a real SA by any technical definition. In both reset positions, pulling the trigger will still perform two actions: compress the mainspring AND release the hammer. Not to mention that the trigger only remains in the intermediate position if the operator holds it there. Once released, the trigger returns to the full forward position on its own (self-decocking). Thus it is still DA by any technical definition. But every piece of documentation I have seen on the DAK indicates it is intended to be operated the same way as a standard DAO, with the added "just in case" capability to compensate for the operator short stroking the trigger.

I also like the HK LEM. Not as much as I like DA/SA but I do like it more than DAK. What it has in common with the SIG DAK is that the trigger always returns to the full forward position on its own when released. But that's pretty much where the similarities end and it seems to have a different purpose than DAK anyway.

I hope OP doesn't think I've hijacked his thread. Not my intention. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Thanks. I suppose an operator could also intentionally use the DAK intermediate reset function as a pseudo-SA trigger pull. It isn't a real SA by any technical definition. In both reset positions, pulling the trigger will still perform two actions: compress the mainspring AND release the hammer. Not to mention that the trigger only remains in the intermediate position if the operator holds it there. Once released, the trigger returns to the full forward position on its own (self-decocking). Thus it is still DA by any technical definition. But every piece of documentation I have seen on the DAK indicates it is intended to be operated the same way as a standard DAO, with the added "just in case" capability to compensate for the operator short stroking the trigger.

I also like the HK LEM. Not as much as I like DA/SA but I do like it more than DAK. What it has in common with the SIG DAK is that the trigger always returns to the full forward position on its own when released. But that's pretty much where the similarities end and it seems to have a different purpose than DAK anyway.

I hope OP doesn't think I've hijacked his thread. Not my intention. :)
Not bothering me at all my man. Explain away.
 

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I don't like DAK, but I can explain. DAK is intended to address a common operator error with DAO. The long travel of DAO is an advantage under stressful situations because it minimizes the chances of an accidental discharge. But the long reset of DAO is a disadvantage under stressful situations when the operator intends to continue shooting but fails to allow the trigger to come forward far enough to reset (short stroking the trigger). That's where DAK comes in. The trigger has two resets. The first is the standard reset where the trigger is allowed to come forward all the way (just like DAO). The second is the intermediate reset where the trigger is only allowed to come forward part of the way (almost like SA). The weapon can be fired from this position but it will be an even heavier trigger pull than from the full forward position. If the trigger is released past the intermediate reset, it will return to the full forward position on its own. The idea is to shoot DAK exactly like you would shoot DAO. But if you mess up by short stroking the trigger, the gun will still be able to fire as long as you have let the trigger travel to at least the intermediate reset point.
That was very clear, thanks for the explanation, I understand now
 

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MY understanding has always been the above mentioned lightened DA to allow consistent trigger pull. I had a 226 DAK but my daughter liked it so now it’s hers. I have, in the mean time, found you can “tune” the DA part of a DA/SA gun. Sig did it on my old 228 they went over, and I plan on getting Robert’s superstruts installed on all my hammer guns, plus play with a lightened DA pull. I believe the length of pull is sufficient “safety” to not loose a round “unintentionally”. Doesn’t need to feel like a tractor pull.

Kellerman designed the DAK for a DA about like a worked Smith, and he succeeded quite well. One just has to be a revolver-type of guy to really like it. But it definitely beats the stock DA of most unaltered DA/SA guns.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
MY understanding has always been the above mentioned lightened DA to allow consistent trigger pull. I had a 226 DAK but my daughter liked it so now it’s hers. I have, in the mean time, found you can “tune” the DA part of a DA/SA gun. Sig did it on my old 228 they went over, and I plan on getting Robert’s superstruts installed on all my hammer guns, plus play with a lightened DA pull. I believe the length of pull is sufficient “safety” to not loose a round “unintentionally”. Doesn’t need to feel like a tractor pull.

Kellerman designed the DAK for a DA about like a worked Smith, and he succeeded quite well. One just has to be a revolver-type of guy to really like it. But it definitely beats the stock DA of most unaltered DA/SA guns.
Giving up my age a little bit here but when I started in LE we carried the Smith and Wesson 686 in 357mag. We changed to the Glock in 40cal sometime around 01 or 02 with duty weapon becoming G22 for patrol and a G23 for investigators. I think I teared up a little that day. I didn't want to change.
 
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