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Normal 1911 wear and tear?

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I just bought my first firearm a Sig Sauer 1911 nitron 45 Auto and have fired 325 rounds in 2 range vists.I was just wondering if it was normal to get a some wear on the under side of the slide (disco rail) or the blocky rail looking thing, where the disconnect touches the slide.i will post a pic.
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First off,Welcome.
Second. The stuff that the weapon came with is NOT a lubricant. it is a protectant to prevent rust and corrosion. So you want to do the following :

1. Get some Good Grease. (I buy Brian Eno's Slide Glide) This is important. You can use any real Heavy High temperature, High Pressure grease, but you want to make sure it is thick, Stands up to High (+100 Degrees) temperatures, and is extremely high lubricity properties. Heavy Wheel bearing grease was a good alternative.
2. Get some Very Good De Greaser. (You want to use this to clean the pistol now.) I use TV and Electronics Parts Cleaner.
3. Get a bottle of a CLP (Cleaner Lubricant Protector) like Break Free.
4. Clean off place 24X36 of your desk and put down a Good towel. (Good condition but one you are going to use forever more as a Cleaning station.)
5 Find the right screw-driver, or allen wrench for the grip screws of your .45. Get a SMALL size set of Q-tips for the luberication process. (Makes it easy to see and manage. You need 1/2 dozen or so.) And also get a few (1/2 dozen) small size paper towels. If you have some Blue Loc-Tite thread adhesive, you are also Golden.
6 Get a cup of coffee.
7 Tune in your favorite radio station.
8 SHUT THE DOOR. (Tell the wife/kids/SO you need about 1/2 hour undisturbed.)
Prepation is finished. Now to do operations First is Disassembly.

1. Remove the Slide from the weapon. Remove recoil spring and barrel from slide.
2. Remove the grips from the frame. Set the screws on the work towel so they don't go wandering around on you.
3. Using the Degreaser clean all of the surfaces of the weapon, Use Spray nozzle to force degreaser down all cracks, holes and crevices on the weapon. Most of the time this stuff is pretty effective and will pull the old Gunk/Junk out of the way. Set it on towel to dry, drink coffee.

Lubrication and reassembly.

There are 3 rules for proper lubrication of a weapon.
1. If it slides, it gets' greased. SIGS are like women. They are best when run Wet.
2. If it spins, it gets CLP (I use Break Free CLP) This allows the lubricant to evenly coat the small not heavy load surfaces to both prevent rust and provide lubrication.
3. If a bullet or cartridge touches it, it is clean and no lubricant. Most bullets today are sealed pretty well to prevent Oil contamination of powder, but it is still a good idea to keep the magazine area clean and clear of dust, lubricant and contaminants.

So, following rule 2 first. Hammer, Trigger, and Slide Lock surfaces all get lightly coated between surfaces with CLP. Pay attention to the transfer bar assembly of the trigger. you want o remember to lube carefully both sides. (Use the q-tip to apply so you can see exactly what you are doing). Same for Magazine release

The internals are pretty easy to disassemble, but I don't want to encourage that now. Not until you can look at a detailed disassembly U-Tube for the SIG .45s

If you are don'e with Frame assembly, now replace the Grips onto the frame. Put the Lock Tite on the screws for the grips and tighten 1/4 turn past full contact. Set lower aside.

Now we make sure all of the surfaces of the SLIDE, Barrel, and the Guide Rod for Recoil spring are now bare metal. Make sure internal surface of barrel is clean as well.

Gently and lightly GREASE the external surface of the Guide rod for the spring. Set aside.
Gently and lightly GREASE the External surface of the Barrel. Pay particular attention to top locking lugs, and Link and Lnk pin. You want these to slide easily and rotate easily.
Set aside. (It is important that when you set these aside that you put them on a clean surface that will not cause any Cat/Dog/Your hair to stick to things.)

Come we now to the next stage. The rails of the firearm (where you are seeing the wear) are the areas of the Frame you want to grease. I put a LIGHT coat of grease all along the Rail surface and the top of the contact surfaces of the Hammer as well as top of the Slide retainer. Now set Frame down.

Pick up slide. Inside of the Rails of the slide get a thin coating of grease all along the surface area from the rear to the retaining collet on the front of the slide. I also lightly grease the outside of the Retainer Bushing of the .45 to make reassembly easier. Also along the back of the locking block of the Slide where the Firing pin block is as well as the Disconnector for the trigger. Remember these are SLIDE areas. Not Spins.

Now re-assemble. Be patient, properly lubericated pieces are slippery so you want to have a good grip.

DONE!

Cycle the slide a few dozen times by hand with no ammunition or magazine in the frame. this allows you to make sure that the Grease is properly distributed. Wipe off excess. If you see some excess, WIPE it, don't fuss too much. Remember, SIGS like to Run Wet.

Enjoy. Now I need my 2nd cup of coffee.
 

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The disco does slide back and forth on that ledge when firing. And as soon as gun goes back into battery it is pushed back up into its slot. But thru normal operation it never 'pings' that area where that ding is.

See the 25 second mark or so on this link. It is the middle finger of mainspring that allows the disco to be pushed down and pushes it back up when going into battery.

https://youtu.be/dM17QKQ6YC8

Since you didn't field strip it prior it's impossible to know but I'm gonna go with that ding was there when you got it and not caused by the action of shooting it.
What does disco tip look like? I would use a flat file and make sure the surface of the ledge inside slide is smooth so it can glide over the disco easily. But I don't think it much to worry about.

Slide off, hammer down, squeeze trigger and see if you can push the disco down. If it moves freely I think you're ok.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Uhmm that doesn't look like any wear to me. Looks like a bruise. Did something fall on it while disassembled?
No never dropped anything on it while it was disassembled, it may have happened at the factory but it does look like the mark is exactly were the disconnect is.Tacops fan your 1911 doesn't have any marks in that area? If my 1911 doesn't
continue to show indention marks i will be happy
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The disco does slide back and forth on that ledge when firing. And as soon as gun goes back into battery it is pushed back up into its slot. But thru normal operation it never 'pings' that area where that ding is.

See the 25 second mark or so on this link. It is the middle finger of mainspring that allows the disco to be pushed down and pushes it back up when going into battery.

https://youtu.be/dM17QKQ6YC8

Since you didn't field strip it prior it's impossible to know but I'm gonna go with that ding was there when you got it and not caused by the action of shooting it.
What does disco tip look like? I would use a flat file and make sure the surface of the ledge inside slide is smooth so it can glide over the disco easily. But I don't think it much to worry about.

Slide off, hammer down, squeeze trigger and see if you can push the disco down. If it moves freely I think you're ok.
Thank you for the advice i will check out the Disco but from what you said, i think that mark was there before i owned the firearm. Thanks of taking the time and posting :D If anyone has any insight please comment
 

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Well instead of going to a therapist I sometimes make clean guns cleaner. It's very soothing. :)
And I can say none of my 1911s have that dimple there.



The only time the disco is in that spot is when slide is retracted and ejecting. And that happens so quick I think it difficult if not impossible for the disco to have caused that.
If it is in fact somehow 'stuck' up and not moving up and down freely it would either
A: be itself severely worn from getting rubbed to death
Or
B: the entire disco ledge on slide would already be showing drag marks and a worn channel.
Or
C: both
It's not. So I think it was there. Smooth it out a bit and keep on keeping on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
that doesn't look like wear, did you noticed when NIB ? looks to me handling or machine marks from the factory, I would worry about it and is not something you see unless taking it apart, enjoy that great firearm.
I only had this firearm for 2 weeks but yeah i think your right,i believe the mark happened at the factory.When i disassembled the gun i was very careful but i never thoroughly inspected the firearm till the 3rd time, that when i noticed the tiny mark.I'm new to firearm's, so im just trying to make sure nothing is wrong with it
 

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Isn't that indention where they test the hardness of the steel? I don't think that is damage or wear, but a test spot from a production procedure.
 

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Looks like a bruise to me that could have been there since it left the factory.
I would use a fine burnishing stone and smooth it up.

All the hardness testers that I have used and seen used all uses a diamond and will leave a small dot marked impression.

I would not worry about it, just smooth and carry on.
 
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Well instead of going to a therapist I sometimes make clean guns cleaner. It's very soothing. :)
And I can say none of my 1911s have that dimple there.



The only time the disco is in that spot is when slide is retracted and ejecting. And that happens so quick I think it difficult if not impossible for the disco to have caused that.
If it is in fact somehow 'stuck' up and not moving up and down freely it would either
A: be itself severely worn from getting rubbed to death
Or
B: the entire disco ledge on slide would already be showing drag marks and a worn channel.
Or
C: both
It's not. So I think it was there. Smooth it out a bit and keep on keeping on.
Please think of me in your will. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Looks like a bruise to me that could have been there since it left the factory.
I would use a fine burnishing stone and smooth it up.

All the hardness testers that I have used and seen used all uses a diamond and will leave a small dot marked impression.

I would not worry about it, just smooth and carry on.
Thanks that's Great advice :)
 

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Looks like a bruise to me that could have been there since it left the factory.
I would use a fine burnishing stone and smooth it up.

All the hardness testers that I have used and seen used all uses a diamond and will leave a small dot marked impression.

I would not worry about it, just smooth and carry on.
Very strange place to test the hardness though. Don't you think?
 

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No never dropped anything on it while it was disassembled, it may have happened at the factory but it does look like the mark is exactly were the disconnect is.Tacops fan your 1911 doesn't have any marks in that area? If my 1911 doesn't
continue to show indention marks i will be happy
No, I have springers but that area is still a non vertical movement. Like stated earlier smooth it down and check trigger action for any catches or non smoothness

Hope this helps
 
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