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I just purchased a new P239 TAC 9mm and none of the ammo I normally use in my other 9mms will load. Round jams on the lower ramp and will not go into the chamber. This includes three different hollow points and even my round-nose target rounds. Anyone else have this problem and how do I overcome it? Thanks.
 

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The "standard" things first:

The problem is usually caused by friction. Easy stuff first:

Clean and lube the parts that slide (frame, slide rails, barrel, barrel lug and hood, guide rod and spring).

Try again. Still hanging up? Put a dab of grease on the feed ramp at and below where the bullet nose is coming to a stop . . . does it work with the dab of grease? If so, polish the feed ramp.

If it's still marginal, carefully inspect an ejected round. Does the case show scratches in the brass? Are there brass particles on breech face or extractor? The extractor claw could have a burr etc. Field strip gun and slide a cartridge case up the breech face, as it would have to move during chambering . . . Does the case slide up and under the extractor claw with a minimum amount of fuss and additional friction? The extractor claw should hold the cartridge in place even with light shaking.
 

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Before you going polishing feed ramps and other things, and voiding your lifetime warranty. Look at your mags, 85% of all semi auto malfunctions are mag related. Don't panic yet.;)
 

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I'm sure it just needs to break in and loosen up. My 2003 P239 with many thousands of rounds through it is fantastic. I have no issues with any ammo. Just give it time before you give up on it.
 

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I just purchased a new P239 TAC 9mm and none of the ammo I normally use in my other 9mms will load. Round jams on the lower ramp and will not go into the chamber. This includes three different hollow points and even my round-nose target rounds. Anyone else have this problem and how do I overcome it? Thanks.
First, welcome to SigTalk from warm South Florida.
Do not despair. The P239 will eat any ammo. Most likely, it needs a little breaking in like BBLR said. Follow BUMPER'S advice, grease is your best friend in a SIG.
As you know, these guns get shipped with a lot of presservative. Clean the gun and mags well, and grease it. 99.99% chance that it will work. If not, call SIG on Monday and they will take care of you.
 

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I had that problem with the 10-round extended mags on my P239 9mm. I had to leave them loaded for a couple of days and the problem went away. The springs were a bit strong. It could be your 8-round mags are a little extra stiff. Try leaving them fully-loaded for a couple of days.
 
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Before you going polishing feed ramps and other things, and voiding your lifetime warranty. Look at your mags, 85% of all semi auto malfunctions are mag related. Don't panic yet.;)
Polishing a feed ramp, done properly, which is easy, will not void anything. I believe that unless obvious mods are done to a gun, which mods could be deemed by SIG as causal to failure, the warranty would not be voided.

I agree a defective magazine could cause the OP's problem, I assumed he'd tried more than one, but see now that's not mentioned. I don't agree 85% of semi-auto malfunctions are mag related, at least not in my experience with SIGs. Maybe with 1911's, some of which can be ammo/mag persnickety. :rolleyes:

How would one even begin to do an accurate, comprehensive study to come up with a figure like 85% of semi-auto malfunctions etc?? Some guns, I know, have fairly dismal magazine reliability, (the WWI French Chauchat comes to mind though it was full auto), and some, like SIGs using Mec-Gar (Italian) or German made mags are excellent. I've heard of issues with Checkmate mags, but no experience with them.
 

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If these are the 8 round 9mm mags, Are you actually loading 8 rounds in the mag each time you get a jam? The 239's I've had generally took a while for the mags to loosen up, so I usually load 1 less than the max. As others have said, Lube the feed ramp a bit. I use a Q tip and rub a little oil on the feed ramps of all my pistols every cleaning.
 

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You did not mention how many rounds that you have fired so far, as was mentioned above, it may just need a few hundred rounds through it to break it in.

You may have cleaned and lubed it before shooting, but that was not mentioned either. That is important for a even a new gun. I like to make sure that the rails on mine are greased pretty well.

Bumper's suggestion about the feed ramp is a good one.

The P239 is a nice gun, you should get good service from it.
 

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That is important for every new gun. I like to make sure that the rails on mine are greased pretty well.

Bumper's suggestion about the feed ramp is a good one.
Fixed that for you...;)

As Mainer noted, you don't say whether you cleaned and greased the gun before you shot it.

New [and "new to you"] semi-auto firearms need to be properly inspected, cleaned, lubricated and function checked before they are shot. Sliding friction components get quality grease [I recommend Brian Enos' SlideGlide lite] and rotating surfaces get quality oil [I recommend Militec-1]. Magazines get disassembled, thoroughly cleaned inside and out [including wiping down springs] and the followers cleaned and inspected for burrs, then lubricated inside and out with the same Militec-1, then wiped dry with clean cotton patches.

Here's an excellent primer on Sig Pistol Lubrication by Scott Folk - formerly working under Bruce Gray, I believe he's now working with Apex Sports.

As bumper notes - polishing the feed-ramp will only improve reliability and WILL NOT void your warranty. I disagree with him regarding greasing the feed-ramp. The feed-ramp should be dry and highly polished to a mirror finish. Every single semi-auto firearm I own has the feed-ramp polished - and those frequently shot get those feed-ramps cleaned up and re-polished periodically. Side-note: the objective is to polish the feed-ramp, not to reshape the feed-ramp by taking material off of it - just polish out the imperfections so the bullets slide up it as friction-less as possible.

Put this in perspective - which do you think has less friction against a bullet? 440 grit sandpaper or a piece of glass?


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Bumper said Put a dab of grease on the feed ramp at and below where the bullet nose is coming to a stop does it work with the dab of grease. Bumper is right. Had this issue with my P238. would not feed HP. I Put some lube on the feed ramp and HP would feed. The only ammo that would feed without lube was WWB FMJ FN. Put 400 rounds through the gun and the ammo polished the feed ramp Now the gun feeds HP. with no issues. 100% reliable. This is really an amazing gun.
 

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I had this issue with my 239 Tac also. I've left my mags loaded and I have run a fair amount of round nose through it. I also rubbed the feed ramp lightly with some of the finest Emery board I could find as was suggested to me. It seems to be working well for me now with 124 gr gold dots though it does not like 124 gr sig hollow points.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 
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I disagree with him regarding greasing the feed-ramp. The feed-ramp should be dry and highly polished to a mirror finish.
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Steve,

To be clear, I agree with you the feed ramp should be dry. I was not suggesting that greasing the feed ramp be part of routine lubrication, only that it may be useful as a one time diagnostic tool to determine if friction at that point was causing or contributing to the feed problem.
 

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Steve,

To be clear, I agree with you the feed ramp should be dry. I was not suggesting that greasing the feed ramp be part of routine lubrication, only that it may be useful as a one time diagnostic tool to determine if friction at that point was causing or contributing to the feed problem.
Ah, gotcha.

As a temporary method to help diagnose the issue, that may work. However, even then, if the ramp itself is on the "less finished" side it may not actually help more than one or possibly two rounds. I personally have never tried using grease as a diagnostic tool on feeding issues, so I can't speak to it with any authority.

Two things I can speak to with authority is 1) I've seen and polished out some of the roughest ramps that clearly never should have left the manufacturer [unfortunately] from Sig and Kimber - and 2) I've fixed - not really the correct term - some feeding problems that were created by the shooter greasing the ramp - which attracts bullet fragments and burnt/unburnt powders when firing - by simply cleaning the goop off the ramp.


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I had that problem with the 10-round extended mags on my P239 9mm. I had to leave them loaded for a couple of days and the problem went away. The springs were a bit strong. It could be your 8-round mags are a little extra stiff. Try leaving them fully-loaded for a couple of days.
I do that with all of my semi-auto mags. Load em up full and leave them for two weeks.
Works every time.:D
 

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Send it back to Sig and tell them to fix it. It's absurd to spend the kind of money a Sig costs and not have it work perfectly out of the box.
Yep, yep and yep!
Well at least for the part about "should be working out of the box". I just sent in my 2nd consecutive new Sig purchase (two brand new guns in 3 months, both over $1k!) to be repaired. I let them know how I feel about the "New" American Sig quality as compared to the old German stuff.
It is not only wrong to let a gun out of the shop, not working correctly, but it is absolutely disheartening. As I mentioned in another thread, I am done with new Sig pistols. It's a shame that we Americans can't match the Germans when it comes to machinery and quality in general. :confused::confused::(
 

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Welcome to SigTalk. I can't add anything beyond the sage advice above but wanted to welcome you to the forum. Shoot your new Sig lots and often. A workout is usually the fix. Greetings from the flat lands of Kansas.
 
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