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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just came home from the lgs with a new Sig 1911 Nightmare Fast Back, 5". Hoping I made the right decision... A bit of background: a couple of days ago, I traded my S&W e-series with crimson trace grips for a hunting rifle. The smith was my first 1911, and while I liked it, I didn't LOVE it. It was a bit of an impulse buy (no one else here has ever done that, right?); it was a used pistol I saw in the shop and just couldn't pass up. It had some work done on it, namely a trigger job and the top of the slide had been ported, almost beretta style. The trigger was fantastic, but I could have done without the slide porting. I'm not sure it increased performance, but it sure as heck created an opening for something to get in and wreak havoc on the barrel and/or slide. I live in central Oregon, where fine lava rock dust is omnipresent, so the chance of a bit of grit to find its way into the inside of my pistol was a constant (if unsubstantiated) worry. I had a couple other issues with the smith as well.
The fish scale serrations, while attractive looking, were difficult to get a good grip on with sweaty hands. Also, when inserting a fresh mag with the slide locked back, it would jam up almost every time. The first round would half chamber, but the second round would poke it's nose up and get wedged in the feed ramp. I'd have to drop the loaded mag, which was typically jammed up as well, jiggle the offending round out of the way, and some times eject the chambered round as well in the process. Kind of frustrating. Also, on one occasion, the slide stop pin worked its way loose during battery and spun around 90 degrees, requiring complete disassembly. Now, while the feeding problem in all likelihood was a magazine issue, and it's possible (probable?) the pin coming loose was a result of me either not having seated it properly during previous reassembly or accidentally putting pressure on the backside with my trigger finger while racking the slide, between these issues and the aforementioned dissatisfaction with the serrations and ported slide, I jumped at the chance to trade it for a barely used Tikka t3 stainless in 7mm mag with a Zeiss conquest 4.5-14×44. Good rifle, great scope, and exactly what I was looking for for the upcoming mule deer/elk season.

I really wanted to keep a 45 acp 1911 in the collection though, as I find the platform to be very natural pointing and shooting, and I already have a few hundred rounds of .45 loaded up, as well as several hundred more rounds of empty brass and .45 dies. I went to the lgs with an open mind, though I was actually leaning towards an STI Trojan or a SA loaded. However, after handling just about every 1911 available around $1000 (Kimbers, Colts, STI, SA), the fast back Sigs just felt the best in my hand. The only other model which felt as nice was a DW (a valor, I think), but I just couldn't stomach the $1600 price tag, especially for a gun I'm going to be tromping around the woods with. The decision then came down to the nightmare or the emperor scorpion and full size or carry. The two seemed to be basically identical other than grip texture and color, and I preferred the look of the nightmare. While the carry model felt pretty nicely balanced, I plan on taking advantage of SA's 'gear up' promo to get an EMP 4 for daily carry in the next month or so. It seemed like a better deal to get the four free mags with the EMP, as they are proprietary, as opposed to four free 1911 mags that I probably would just end up replacing with Wilson's anyway. The full sized 1911 seemed like a better choice for carry while hunting/hiking/wood cutting against four legged critters who may find me appetizing. Price was a hair over $900, and I picked up an extra Wilson mag for another $38.

The sig is definitely different than the e series, with no full length guide rod or ramped barrel, and it has a series 80 firing pin block, whereas the smith had a modified schwartz style safety. I haven't had a chance to live fire it, but dry firing the trigger doesn't seem quite as crisp as the smith, with a bit more take up. Is that because of the firing pin block? Anyone have any first hand feedback on this model? My priorities are reliability, accuracy, and longevity, in that order. I will admit my decision was swayed by my recent purchase of a 226 ASE, which has gone through about 1300 rounds in a month, with ZERO hiccups using ammo of every shape and weight imaginable in 9mm.

As always, sorry for the novel length post! It's just that after the initial "purchase euphoria", I'm hoping I made the right call.
Cheers, Joe
 

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All's I can say is 1. Congratz!
2. I have an all stainless XO model. The trigger is on her is just exceptional for an $800 pistol. I have 2 X5"s, so I know what a good trigger should be. Mine has very little take up and breaks like glass at 4.25 pounds.
Nary a hiccup either....However, Ive always felt a got really lucky with my 1911. Ive handled other Sig 1911's and some dont have that good a trigger and only 1 Ive seen has had a lighter trigger. But, all the Sig 1911 pistols Ive handled have had really good triggers.
Reason I say this is because most Sig 1911 models are the same basically just different levels of trim.
I'd be really surprised if you have any trouble out of that 1911.
 

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I assure you, No doubt you made a good decision. As you, I recently intended to purchase an STI or Springfield, but ran across a used Sig Nightmare 1911 full size that was like new with no indication of it having ever been fired. The date of manufacture was less than a year old when I purchased it. After handling and examining the pistol, I left with it never having had the intention to buy a Sig 1911. This is no doubt the best shooting pistol that I have. When first taking it out to the range I hand some hand-loaded 200 gr SWC that I loaded for use in my sig P220, With these, I had a few hiccups. I did come home and extended the OAL by .025 these SWC bullets have now worked flawlessly as well as hollow points and with 230 gr RN plated bullets. It could be that the pistol needed some breaking in and maybe it would not have been necessary to change the OAL of my SWC's. Regardless, since then I have never had the first problem and the pistol shoots like a dream. I did purchase the Wilson 7 round magazine so I can carry it with a flush fitting magazine. I also put a recoil buffer in, although it is not needed, and the pistol continues to work flawlessly. I also adjust the over travel of the trigger and by use of the tabs on the trigger, reduced the take up some. I considered removing the series 80 parts and inserting a spacer in its place, but with the gun performing and shooting as well as it does, I will leave it as is. The trigger breaks crisp and could be made a bit lighter by removing the series 80 parts, but no need so I will leave it as is.

I would have never gave this gun a second look having an STI in mind but since it is such a sharp looking gun, it caught my eye, and consequently came home with me. Most satisfying gun purchase I have made in the past 40 years. I have some premium pistols and revolvers, but this is my favorite. Enjoy your Sig 1911 Nightmare. Excellent choice and just as good or better than more expensive 1911's
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I assure you, No doubt you made a good decision. As you, I recently intended to purchase an STI or Springfield, but ran across a used Sig Nightmare 1911 full size that was like new with no indication of it having ever been fired. The date of manufacture was less than a year old when I purchased it. After handling and examining the pistol, I left with it never having had the intention to buy a Sig 1911. This is no doubt the best shooting pistol that I have. When first taking it out to the range I hand some hand-loaded 200 gr SWC that I loaded for use in my sig P220, With these, I had a few hiccups. I did come home and extended the OAL by .025 these SWC bullets have now worked flawlessly as well as hollow points and with 230 gr RN plated bullets. It could be that the pistol needed some breaking in and maybe it would not have been necessary to change the OAL of my SWC's. Regardless, since then I have never had the first problem and the pistol shoots like a dream. I did purchase the Wilson 7 round magazine so I can carry it with a flush fitting magazine. I also put a recoil buffer in, although it is not needed, and the pistol continues to work flawlessly. I also adjust the over travel of the trigger and by use of the tabs on the trigger, reduced the take up some. I considered removing the series 80 parts and inserting a spacer in its place, but with the gun performing and shooting as well as it does, I will leave it as is. The trigger breaks crisp and could be made a bit lighter by removing the series 80 parts, but no need so I will leave it as is.

I would have never gave this gun a second look having an STI in mind but since it is such a sharp looking gun, it caught my eye, and consequently came home with me. Most satisfying gun purchase I have made in the past 40 years. I have some premium pistols and revolvers, but this is my favorite. Enjoy your Sig 1911 Nightmare. Excellent choice and just as good or better than more expensive 1911's
Could you walk me through the take up adjustment procedure?
 

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Could you walk me through the take up adjustment procedure?

There are tabs on the trigger bow that can be bent outwards that will adjust for the take up. YOu can look on line and find numerous instructions for performing this. A good YouTube example can be watched at this site,

Mine came with this tabs untouched as I presume they all do from the factory. It is left up to the end consumer to adjust to their preference.
 

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Congrats on the 1911 Nightmare.

I had a SIG 1911 XO for about 3 years. Never had any issues. Well built.

You did good!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
[/quote]
There are tabs on the trigger bow that can be bent outwards that will adjust for the take up. YOu can look on line and find numerous instructions for performing this.

Mine came with this tabs untouched as I presume they all do from the factory. It is left up to the end consumer to adjust to their preference.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for the good info. Those videos are really helpful, very clear and concise.
I think I'll give it a couple hundred rounds of live fire before I start tweaking anything. The little bit of take up might actually be beneficial in giving me a more consistent trigger feel between platforms. My 226, being DA/SA has a fair amount of take up.

Now if it would just stop raining I could try her out!
 

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You did good! A while back I sold a Wilson Combat 1911 I had owned for years because I wasn't shooting it. A week later a "friend" at a LGS showed me a used, but unfired Sig Super Target and I had to have it....and it shot great. Soon after I saw a full size Nightmare and actually traded my 226 Legion SAO for it (couldn't get use to the 226 grip, too big). And I am extremely pleased with the Nightmare.

That's a long way of saying that the Sig Nightmare is an excellent pistol, accurate, reliable and great looking. Having owned a number of 1911's, the Sigs I own stack up nicely against any of them. A Wilson Combat will get the edge on finish and smooth shooting, but the Sigs are not that far behind.

Hope you enjoy your Nightmare....good choice!
 
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