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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am new to handguns, purchased a Sig because of the ratings, wanting something that would absolutely work for home defense. Went through training with my Sig (P229 .40) and the recoil is ROUGH. I was told to try a LITE ammo. Thoughts on LITE ammo (with this gun in particular) & recommendations? Thanks!!
 

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What grain bullet were you using with the rough recoil? That'll help in offering suggestions. I know Underwood has some 100 and 115 extreme defender rounds. Never used them but I don't know of anything with a smaller grain bullet.

https://www.underwoodammo.com/collections/all/cartridge_40-s-w+product-line_xtreme-defender

Edit: Federal also has an American Eagle product that uses 155 grain bullets, haven't tried them either since I stick with 180s, but they are cheaper to try than the Underwood and would be a good choice for target practice.

https://www.federalpremium.com/handgun/american-eagle/american-eagle-handgun/11-AE40R2.html
 

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Without knowing what ammo you were using during "training" and what sort of "training" course it was, it would be hard to make any specific recommendations.

I would try any of the 180-gr. FMJ loadings from Federal, Winchester-Western (W-W), Sellier & Bellot = S&B. I would also recommend using the 180-gr. Federal HST or Winchester Defense rounds for defense. The loading with the lighter bullet weights (165, 135, etc.) are real barn-stormers. (I know this for a fact, as my former agency issued 165-gr JHP that was definitely hotter than the 180-gr. JHPs we also had, and I also shot .40 in IPSC Limited class)

We seem to hear a lot on the various manufacturer-specific internet discussion boards (SIGTalk, GlockTalk, HKForum, etc.) about how fabulous the loadings are from "boutique" manufacturers. Seems that is the only advertising they get. I will posit this: If they were the equivalent of Thor's Hammer and Zeus' Thunderbolt, their ammo would be found in the guns of every LE agency in the country. Instead, we find Federal HST, Speer Gold Dot, Hornady Flex-tip, Remington Golden Sabre Bonded, and W-W Lawman... The products have undergone rigorous testing and passed with flying colors-and consistency.

If you are looking for a LIGHTER (LITE) practice load for your P226 platform, I would encourage you to buy a nice 9mm P226 LE trade-in for training and practice. It will pay for itself in the cost of ammo alone. you could also pick up a .22lr conversion unit, but for the equivalent cost, you could buy a nice Ruger MK 4 or Browning Buckmark .22 and, for about $150-$200 more, a complete P226 .22lr and not have to futz around with parts.
 

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Welcome from "The Lone Star State".

If you find the recoil of the .40 S&W rough you might need to do one of the following things.:

1 - Continue shooting the .40 and eventually you will get used to it. Try the above recommended ammo.

2 - Buy a 9mm conversion barrel, recoil spring, and magazine and just shoot 9mm.

My wife started out with a .380 in a P230. She thought that the recoil was too much for her. I had her try a P239 in 9mm to get her reaction.
She liked that better than the .380 in the P230.The heavier P239 was better able to tame the recoil.

Now years later she has no problem with her P239 shooting either .40 S&W or 357 SIg. It was just a matter of her getting used to the more potent round.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Thanks for the responses! I love the feel of the P229 and will definitely keep practicing with it! I was shooting with Winchester. 40 S&W 165 grain "target", if that info helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting! I tried the instructor's 9mm Glock and did not like the feel ....but it just felt like a toy gun....if that makes sense.
I'm definitely going to keep practicing. I was told that my grip needs to be a lot tighter with the non-dominant hand (left) & that will help along with using lite rounds.

QUOTE=SheepdogIHS;5148984]Welcome from "The Lone Star State".

If you find the recoil of the .40 S&W rough you might need to do one of the following things.:

1 - Continue shooting the .40 and eventually you will get used to it. Try the above recommended ammo.

2 - Buy a 9mm conversion barrel, recoil spring, and magazine and just shoot 9mm.

My wife started out with a .380 in a P230. She thought that the recoil was too much for her. I had her try a P239 in 9mm to get her reaction.
She liked that better than the .380 in the P230.The heavier P239 was better able to tame the recoil.

Now years later she has no problem with her P239 shooting either .40 S&W or 357 SIg. It was just a matter of her getting used to the more potent round.[/QUOTE]
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
What grain bullet were you using with the rough recoil? That'll help in offering suggestions. I know Underwood has some 100 and 115 extreme defender rounds. Never used them but I don't know of anything with a smaller grain bullet.

https://www.underwoodammo.com/collections/all/cartridge_40-s-w+product-line_xtreme-defender

Edit: Federal also has an American Eagle product that uses 155 grain bullets, haven't tried them either since I stick with 180s, but they are cheaper to try than the Underwood and would be a good choice for target practice.

https://www.federalpremium.com/handgun/american-eagle/american-eagle-handgun/11-AE40R2.html
165 grain winchester s&w - thanks!!
 

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I was taught the off hand does 80% of the holding.
Elbow and wrist locked. The thumb along and under the slide.

Bit uncomfortable at first, but when I do it, I am on target. When I don't, i drift low left.

40 tends to muzzle flip, while 45 is more straight back.
The thumb and locked wrist helps control the flip a lot, and that will help you handle the recoil.
If not used to 40 or 45, and more used to 9mm, it will take practice, and my bet is you will grow to like it.

The real key to recoil is the amount and speed of burn of the powder.
I reload and shoot Titegroup, and Power Pistol. I definitely can tell more kick with the Power Pistol. and love the stuff.

I also have used 800X that is slow burning, and there is less recoil. Meters like a tortilla chip though.

Most target rounds sold do not have a lot of recoil difference, because they are not loaded hot. Medium speed powder mostly because it is cheaper.

40 was developed, because after a Florida shootout the FBI wanted to go 10mm.
Recoil was too much for a lot of agents, so S&W shortened it to 40. Widespread Police use and recoil was not a big problem for most officers.
 
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