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Discussion Starter #1
With 300 rounds through my new P365XL I experienced two failures to fire. The ident on the primer appeared to be slightly lighter than the other rounds, but it still could have been a failure of the round, not the gun. The rounds fired on the second attempt. Without removing the striker the striker channel appears to be clean.

What would anyone recommend? Should I remove the striker and brush out the channel? Should I polish the striker? I don't intend to send it back to Sig unless it happens again and with different ammo.
 

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Make sure the striker and channel are clean and dry.

How many different types of new factory ammo does it happen with?
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Discussion Starter #3
Make sure the striker and channel are clean and dry.

How many different types of new factory ammo does it happen with?
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Without removing the striker from the slide the channel appears to be clean. Do you recommend that I remove the striker from the slide?

I have only shot Winchester 9MM Nato from the same lot. Next trip to the range I will use Federal.
 
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Without removing the striker from the slide the channel appears to be clean. Do you recommend that I remove the striker from the slide?

I have only shot Winchester 9MM Nato from the same lot. Next trip to the range I will use Federal.
Yes, remove the striker and make sure it and the channel are very clean and bone dry.
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What ammo were you shooting?

I missed your post. Winchester.


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When I have a failure to fire I usually put the questionable round in another gun and try to fire it. I haven't seen anyone else recommend this. Is there a reason not to try this?

I had 1500 rounds of Browning 9mm I bought at Academy a while back. 2 boxes (of 150 each) had a few FTF's in them. All of them looked like solid hits. I put a few of them in my P6 (with the stock mainspring) and attempted to fire them until there was a hole in the primers. FWIW, Browning ammo is manufactured by Winchester. Perhaps they have some bad primers floating around.
 

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Without removing the striker from the slide the channel appears to be clean. Do you recommend that I remove the striker from the slide?
Without doing so there is no way to determine that. Go carefully and make sure you don't lose the striker safety and spring.
 

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I am going to take a wild guess here and say the new, thicker, single piece spring retaining cup is limiting the striker travel to a point where there is inadequate protrusion past the breech face. It is very rare that ammunition is defective. Most problems related to primer detonation are because of light primer strikes.
 

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Without removing the striker from the slide the channel appears to be clean. Do you recommend that I remove the striker from the slide?

I have only shot Winchester 9MM Nato from the same lot. Next trip to the range I will use Federal.
Definitely try different ammo. Winchester doesn’t have the best reputation for being consistent. If Federal runs 100 % it’s more than likely the Winchester.


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Federal has softer primer. Just because the Federal ammunition fires, it does not mean there is not an issue. Most try to blame the ammunition because there could not possibly be anything wrong with a Sig. It is amazing how I have never had my Glock 43 fail to fire with all kinds of ammunition.

Just for the hell of it, if willing, shoot the pistol pointing straight at the ground. This will allow for the cartridge to be as far forward in the chamber as possible. It will open up a small gap between the base of the cartridge and the breech face. If your striker protrusion is minimal, this may exacerbate the problem.
 

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Federal has softer primer. Just because the Federal ammunition fires, it does not mean there is not an issue. Most try to blame the ammunition because there could not possibly be anything wrong with a Sig. Just for the hell of it, if willing, shoot the pistol pointing straight at the ground. This will allow for the cartridge to be as far forward in the chamber as possible. It will open up a small gap between the base of the cartridge and the breech face. If your striker protrusion is minimal, this may exacerbate the problem.
It’s not the thing that there could be nothing wrong with a Sig. It’s trouble shooting. When you call Sig on a failure to fire they ask if different ammo was tried.
And again Winchester has a reputation for being less than consistent more so than Sig in my opinion.

A few years ago I had a failure to fire of Hornady CD in my P07. Two rounds. Those two rounds wouldn’t fire in any other gun. The P07 continued to fire 250 straight rounds of S&B. Not one failure to fire since in over 2000 plus rounds. It wasn’t the P07 it was the ammo. Not Hornady CD specifically but those 2 rounds.

So if there is consistent failures to fire with a different brand of ammo then consider the gun. If the ammo in question has a reputation for being inconsistent consider the ammo.

Both of my 365’s have the newer striker and cup. Standard and a XL. zero failures with S&B ,Federal, PPU,Remington. I’ve never shot Winchester because of the reputation of being inconsistent.



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I would remove and clean the striker and channel.
I would also try the round in another firearm.
I had a dud once with Winchester Nato. I still have it. No powder.
 

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I'm trying to understand how one determines the striker channel to be clean without removing the striker.
 

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"Just for the hell of it, if willing, shoot the pistol pointing straight at the ground. This will allow for the cartridge to be as far forward in the chamber as possible. It will open up a small gap between the base of the cartridge and the breech face. If your striker protrusion is minimal, this may exacerbate the problem. "

Use SERIOUS eye protection. Watch your feet. Or maybe just don't do that... :rolleyes:
 

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If someone cannot do this safely then we have lost all hope and maybe said person should stick to spitball straws instead of having a firearm.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I took my striker apart today to clean and dry the inside of the slide and the striker itself. I also used bore cleaner with a bore brush on the channel. I was surprised how much oil had made its way into the striker channel. I use oil very sparingly, only on the contact points of the rail with the frame. The oil most likely did not cause the light strikes, but I will make it a point to clean the striker again after a few thousand rounds. Sig Guy has a youtube video illustrating the removal and reassembly of the P365 striker. The P365XL has a slightly different striker. He states that cleaning the bore channel takes care of 99% of P365 light strikes.
 

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The oil most likely did not cause the light strikes, but I will make it a point to clean the striker again after a few thousand rounds.

Sig Guy has a youtube video illustrating the removal and reassembly of the P365 striker. The P365XL has a slightly different striker. He states that cleaning the bore channel takes care of 99% of P365 light strikes.

The oil and gunk most likely caused your light strikes because it results in some slowing down of the striker in a mild case of hydraulic lock.

As of about September 2019 Sig started using the p365XL striker in the p365s, so they should still be identical in all p365XLs, and p365s made after August 2019.

Sig Guy makes good videos for sure.

I think you've found the cause of your light strikes, please let us know how she ch'oots!

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The oil and gunk most likely caused your light strikes because it results in some slowing down of the striker in a mild case of hydraulic lock.

As of about September 2019 Sig started using the p365XL striker in the p365s, so they should still be identical in all p365XLs, and p365s made after August 2019.

Sig Guy makes good videos for sure.

I think you've found the cause of your light strikes, please let us know how she ch'oots!

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"Just for the hell of it, if willing, shoot the pistol pointing straight at the ground. This will allow for the cartridge to be as far forward in the chamber as possible. It will open up a small gap between the base of the cartridge and the breech face. If your striker protrusion is minimal, this may exacerbate the problem. "

Use SERIOUS eye protection. Watch your feet. Or maybe just don't do that... :rolleyes:

Hell, seen crazier theories.
 

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[QUOTEI use oil very sparingly, only on the contact points of the rail with the frame.
[/QUOTE]

A few years back a friend was the Acade4my armorer who would from time to time do repairs on Academy student handguns. I spent a lot of time there learning quite a lot. One of the biggest issues in failures was excessive oil. For some reason the comment was spread that "Sigs like to run wet". No idea who came up with it but it certainly wasn't those who built and ran them.

Excessive oil would easily get blown into the striker channel and gun things up at some point. For a while, Frog Lube was popular. I tried it. Didn't use much at all. Yet it would melt and flow into the channel. In colder weather it turned to gum.

As George Harris taught us years ago, wiping a light sheen on the surfaces is all that is needed. I found it funny that during the Lucas involvement, all that was ever used was Slip2000.
 
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