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Hey Sig fans,

Just trying to see what the opinion in the forum of using a laser for home defense, I have never shot a pistol with a laser on it and know that they are generally a smart but if you spend the money and get a decent one but I wanted to know what you all thought and other than a battery going bad when you need it are there downsides? Also if you are in favor of it what model, TLRs seem to be a good bet without setting the wallet back tremendously!

Thanks for the input!
 

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A lot of people think they are a bad idea because you can become dependent on them rather than your sights and proper technique. However, if you train properly, they can be of great benefit. There can be many real-life situations where using the sights isn't feasible or time doesn't permit. A laser is another tool in the toolkit that might give you the edge in some situations. I like them.

Check out Crimson Trace. They have a lot of free training videos online and that you can order that really demonstrate the value of having a laser; especially one that is activated instinctively by the grip.
 
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IMHO, having a laser on a gun for home defense make perfect sense. Think about it logically / unemotionally... if ****, you will not have the time to use the sights on your gun. You most likely will point & shoot. Rather than indiscriminately throwing bullets into the air toward a target, a laser's dot (red or green) will let you know (assuming you've sighted the laser to the POI of the bullet) where you're bullet is going. CTC (Crimson Trace) make grips that are designed to fit most Sigs (they make grips for other guns, too). Most of my pistols are equipped with CTC grips. THe exception is that I have a TLR-2 (Tactical Gun Mount Series - TLR-2® | Streamlight) on my P226 (my designated home defense pistol) because I want the benefit of the white light and the laser (I'm stirring the pot here as many do not subscribe to using a light; trained properly in it's use, I do not believe that white light is a liability)) if a situ arises in my home. This is how I view the utility of lasers on guns. YMMV.
 

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IMHO, having a laser on a gun for home defense make perfect sense. Think about it logically / unemotionally... if ****, you will not have the time to use the sights on your gun. You most likely will point & shoot. Rather than indiscriminately throwing bullets into the air toward a target, a laser's dot (red or green) will let you know (assuming you've sighted the laser to the POI of the bullet) where you're bullet is going. CTC (Crimson Trace) make grips that are designed to fit most Sigs (they make grips for other guns, too). Most of my pistols are equipped with CTC grips. THe exception is that I have a TLR-2 (Tactical Gun Mount Series - TLR-2® | Streamlight) on my P226 (my designated home defense pistol) because I want the benefit of the white light and the laser (I'm stirring the pot here as many do not subscribe to using a light; trained properly in it's use, I do not believe that white light is a liability)) if a situ arises in my home. This is how I view the utility of lasers on guns. YMMV.
I totally disagree. Throwing rounds around indiscriminately has nothing to do with laser or no laser... It has everything to do with muscle memory, training and trigger control.

I'm rather disappointed but not surprised that a NRA Range Safety Officer would advocate not always using your sights before pulling a trigger.

In my opinion, a laser is a **** poor replacement for proper professional training and the building of muscle memory and shooting competence with your firearm.
 

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Throwing rounds around indiscriminately has nothing to do with laser or no laser
THIS!!!

While there are a couple valid, extremely unique situations in which a laser may be appropriate, I usually have no use for, nor can I justify the defensive use of a laser. I see their principle strength and use in offensive scenarios.

One huge benefit of iron sights (handgun or long gun) is the constant and consistent indexing with proper training and practice of your draw and presentation. With a laser, depending on your surroundings, you may very well have an extremely difficult time finding the dot. Present your firearm consistently each and every time, your iron sights will be at the same spot, time after time.

If after proper training you decide to add a laser to your tool box, go for it. But please, do not use a laser to "shortcut" your training.
 

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I have a laser on my home defense weapon. I use it exclusively to practice point shooting. I have been point shooting for a number of years and no longer can get to the range as much as I should. I unload twice and practice weekly by pointing at different objects at different distances. When I come on target I hit the laser button "CT grip" and check my aim.

I would never activate it for home defense, night or day.
 

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It's good that we can agree to disagree! Ronin2, please clarify this sentence: "I'm rather disappointed but not surprised that a NRA Range Safety Officer would advocate not always using your sights before pulling a trigger. " What causes you to be surprised? NRA RSO training does not teach shooting. Nor is the use of sights included in the 4 cardinal gun safety rules as taught by the NRA (1.Treat every firearm as if it's loaded; 2. Never point a firearm at anything you are not willing to destroy; 3. Always be sure of your target and what is beyond it; 4. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are on target and ready to fire.). As I said, in a '****' situ, muscle memory or not, I seriously doubt that anyone armed with a gun is going to take the time to aim down the sights. Why? Simple fact. Most individuals don't train for the worst scenario (home invasion would qualify as "worst scenario" in my book). Most gun owners, if they have any formal training at all, take a basic NRA pistol or NRA rifle course. Most CPL classes do not spend a lot of time on the correct use of sights. Only in advanced tactical training (like GunSite or Front Sight) is the issue of muscle memory emphasized. So I maintain that utility of a laser, mounted to a handgun and intended for home defense (as the OP stipulates), makes perfect sense. Having a laser on a firearm helps in a very tense, potentially violent situ. So I don't know what being an NRA RSO has to do with my P-O-V on this topic.
 

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I totally disagree. Throwing rounds around indiscriminately has nothing to do with laser or no laser... It has everything to do with muscle memory, training and trigger control.

I'm rather disappointed but not surprised that a NRA Range Safety Officer would advocate not always using your sights before pulling a trigger.

In my opinion, a laser is a **** poor replacement for proper professional training and the building of muscle memory and shooting competence with your firearm.
I can think of many, many scenerios where lifting your pistol to eye level would be impossible...your position...multi BGs, etc....training can't possably cover all.
 

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I can think of many, many scenerios where lifting your pistol to eye level would be impossible...your position...multi BGs, etc....training can't possably cover all.
Yes, you are correct, let your imagination run wild. Let's keep it in the context of the "typical" armed civilian self defense scenario, a lot of these mental masturbations can be ignored. Proper firearms training and practice will do more good dealing with myriad scenarios that the addition of some gee whiz gizmo. IMHO.
 

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I had a CTC laser on a Glock 22 and thought I shot it well with or without the laser. Until I began taking real training classes and realized I was putting too much focus on the target because of the laser rather than the front sight.
No more lasers for me.


Sent via telegraph with the same fingers I use to sip whiskey.
 

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I have a P226 with the Sig Light/Laser on it and a P250. I keep the light on the 226 for the light. I have found that looking for the laser slow "ME" down. The laser is not a short cut for training. there may be a case where it can have an advantage but in the end you will need to train with it just like you would have to train for sights. If you are hopping for a short cut to training and practice there just isn't one. The laser is a tool like many others. Practice and train with it and you will learn when you use to your gain. Don't train and practice and you could very well find it slowing you down. I shoot USPSA at least once a month. Not because I am that much into competing but it gets me out shooting once a month on the move and multiple targets. For what it is worth when I shoot twice a month I will move up 4 to 6 places when I drop to once a month I slowly drop back down. In the end there is no substitute for practice.
 

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Luckily I do train as though there is only iron sights, in extreme situations many of the people saying a laser couldn't benefit might not perform 100% unless you've actually been exposed to **** hitting the fan I guess you can only say train your muscle memory (which is a exceptional point to make) I also agree that lasers can act as a crutch for many shooters and I am guessing the proper way to use it would only be if you specifically trained for an event to use it. I had no idea my question would arise such a difference in opinion, I do operate with a flashlight for home defense but thought a pistol mounted laser along with a light would be beneficial, I do think it may hurt previous training even practicing with a laser unless you checked with iron sights first. A lasers purpose may be an engagement with multiple attackers and only the fastest target aquisition would do, definitely has benefits but I think you would have a place in situations but without skewing your muscle memory and iron sight abilities.
 

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Luckily I do practice as though there is only iron sights, in extreme situations many of the people saying a laser couldn't benefit might not perform 100% unless you've actually been exposed to **** hitting the fan I guess you can only say train your muscle memory (which is a exceptional point to make)
I have made a slight, although important, edit to your initial statement. My use of the words training and practice, when it comes to firearms education, have completely different meanings that are worth differentiating.

Training is the work you do with a professional firearms instructor, showing you techniques and explaining scenarios and how to properly react with your firearm.

Practice is the work you do on your own time, refining and honing these skills you have acquired from the professional training.

A semantic difference, some might consider not even worth considering, I see it as important and very well worth distinguishing one from the other.
 

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I have made a slight, although important, edit to your initial statement. My use of the words training and practice, when it comes to firearms education, have completely different meanings that are worth differentiating.

Training is the work you do with a professional firearms instructor, showing you techniques and explaining scenarios and how to properly react with your firearm.

Practice is the work you do on your own time, refining and honing these skills you have acquired from the professional training.

A semantic difference, some might consider not even worth considering, I see it as important and very well worth distinguishing one from the other.

Important distinction! I train and practice with the same mindset but with your distinction I'm in another in a series of defensive pistol classes for official training purposes and only use my light (for the low(no) light portions)
 

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One further distinction I believe worthy of consideration:

I don't consider any of the state mandated classes for you to obtain a carry permit to be training. They are just that, a state mandated class to show a minimum level of competence. Emphasis on minimum.
 

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I love lasers for dry firing practice. LaserLytes give instant feedback as to where a bullet likely would have gone, especially on that first DA shot. At the range, a shooter may fire many rounds and have no idea which shot went where. The instant feedback tells a story that allows for better practice for trigger control at lower ammo cost, less travel cost and more productive use of limited time. That said, there is no substitute for live fire since recoil and muzzle blast induce many bad habits in shooters.

I have a laser grip on most of my pistols. This takes a commitment to change the batteries regularly.

The lasers are of little use in bright light, so proper use of iron sights is critically important. In fog, an active laser will give away your position and tell the bad guys to kill the guy with the laser first.

Masad Ayoob aims his lasers to run parallel to the path of the bullet, i.e. to never cross when mounted to the side of the slide. Hence the laser will be good out to 50 yards or whatever, but be off the same amount at all practical distances.

The biggest advantage of the laser sight is the ability to rapidly acquire targets in low light.

Bill
 
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