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**Alloy** Frames (damn autocorrect)

I've recently been hooked on .357 Sig, but I am wondering about frame impact/wear.

I've looked around, and I've noticed that nearly all the PD/Agencies that issues .357 either do so in polymer (frame can flex under stress and not crack) or all steel Sigs (well, it's steel). Has anyone experienced/heard about issues with alloy guns in long term use - especially if I am going to be using loadings that really make the most of the round (Underwood, Buffalo Bore, etc).
 

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**Alloy** Frames (damn autocorrect)

I've recently been hooked on .357 Sig, but I am wondering about frame impact/wear.

I've looked around, and I've noticed that nearly all the PD/Agencies that issues .357 either do so in polymer (frame can flex under stress and not crack) or all steel Sigs (well, it's steel). Has anyone experienced/heard about issues with alloy guns in long term use - especially if I am going to be using loadings that really make the most of the round (Underwood, Buffalo Bore, etc).
The only problem would be if you used too weak of a recoil spring, and let the gun "beat itself to death"!
 

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The slide is also extra heavy to accommodate for the increased recoil. Take a look at the difference between a 9mm and a .40/.357 slide. The difference on the underside is easily seen.
 

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SIG has been very particular about ensuring frame and slide parts are strong enough to handle whatever rounds they are designed for, hence the update of P228 to P229 to cope with the greater stress of the .40 round... and you'll notice that in the 25 years of production since it was released in 1992, there are no true issues of frame/slide failure. It's a robust platform.

The .357SIG round was released two years after the P229 came out, and was likely in development by SIG using the P229 and P226 platforms. Likewise, in 23 years of widespread use as above, notably by many federal agencies, there are no issues with that caliber in the SIG pistols.

Now that's not to say other manufacturers have not had issues with the snappier .357SIG round, especially designs whose barrels do not support the complete shell casing.
 

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Use a good grease on the rails when you go for a range session and she will do fine. ;)
 

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Not sure I understand the question. My 357SIG experience is limited to only a couple hundred rounds, as I just added a 357 barrel for our P229 originally in 40. My impression is that 357's recoil is less than 40, and not more. 357 does seem much louder, but I haven't noticed greater muzzle flip...

It's probably different ammo. I'm running Federal HSTs, Gold Dot and Lawman...

Cheers
 

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No problem at all with my Sig P229 Legion after 250 357 Sig rounds.
 

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I agree with all above posts. Love my 229, 357 SIG. No issues. Tough gun!!
 

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The 229 and 239 are extremely durable weapons for either .357 or .40. Both of these rounds are "snappy" high pressure performance rounds. Case bases are fully supported and if you remember to change springs every 5,000 rounds or so, they weapon will outshoot your budget for ammunition.
 
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