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P365X/P365XL
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My EDC is a Sig P6 (11-83) that has been worked over by Robert Burke, The Sig Armorer. I also had Mr. Burker fit a EFK Fire Dragon barrel as I want to preserve original barrel. This pistol just fits my grip and sight picture better than my other pistols (Sig P229 manufactured in 2017, and Taurus G3C manufactured in 2022). The pistol is as accurate as I can be. Another "gun expert" associate said I was wrong for depending on such an old gun for my EDC. He said I was putting my life at risk depending on a 40-year-old piece of metal that is probably suffering from fatigue and likely has hidden cracks. I didn't pursue this discussion much as I thought he lacked any validity. Now, I am curious as to whether there is any validity to his position. I can't find any real article on this subject. Is there any validity to this position. This pistol has been examined by a recognized expert armorer who said it is fine.
At one time I carried a Gen 2.5 Glock 26 that was (at that time) over 20 years old and well used. It was inspected annually when I qualified. It was as solid then as the day it came off the line. Very likely so is your P6. It would have to have a LOT of rounds through it before any concern came into play. And I mean tens of thousands because it's a quality made pistol. HK has pistols in the 200k - 300k range (roughly) that have never even had spring changes. That's documented by HK and Federal Ammunition. Now that's not to suggest springs/parts never need to be changed, rather that these types of pistols were purpose built for durability. If a qualified armorer, as you mentioned, has examined the pistol and given it the thumbs up then age really doesn't play much of a part in the equation (generally speaking).
 

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My EDC is a Sig P6 (11-83) that has been worked over by Robert Burke, The Sig Armorer. I also had Mr. Burker fit a EFK Fire Dragon barrel as I want to preserve original barrel. This pistol just fits my grip and sight picture better than my other pistols (Sig P229 manufactured in 2017, and Taurus G3C manufactured in 2022). The pistol is as accurate as I can be. Another "gun expert" associate said I was wrong for depending on such an old gun for my EDC. He said I was putting my life at risk depending on a 40-year-old piece of metal that is probably suffering from fatigue and likely has hidden cracks. I didn't pursue this discussion much as I thought he lacked any validity. Now, I am curious as to whether there is any validity to his position. I can't find any real article on this subject. Is there any validity to this position. This pistol has been examined by a recognized expert armorer who said it is fine.
I've got one as well, it boils down to maintenance, and keeping springs fresh. Just as the recommended replacement interval charts, are just that. Proper use as well, is important, as I have repeatedly brought up, the practice of dropping a cartridge into the chamber, and expecting the Extractor, to "jump" the case rim, which is not how it was designed to work. That's the quickest way to destroy a hard to replace Extractor. Maintaining a tight Breech Block, in the Slide, could help prolong the Slides life as well. This is where I would suggest refrain from using +P, to prevent possible stress fracturing of the early Slides.

Having the later feed ramp replacement Barrel, gives a higher probability of reliable functioning with most effective defensive ammunition.

Of course maintaining your Magazines are also important, thankfully Wolff Gunsprings has replacement Magazine Springs, to keep them functioning.

While it would not be my first choice today, I did use a '97 P225 as my EDC for 18 years, and never felt "undergunned".
 

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As @Dkayak wrote, as long as the gun isn't subject to a corrosive environment, age is of no concern. As to replacing springs, whether a spring remains relaxed or remains under tension, there is no wear. It is the "cycling" or flexing of the spring that accumulates wear, and that's typically many thousands of cycles* . . . sitting in the safe or on your hip, no wear to springs. Leaving mags loaded, again, no wear.

*Replacing gun springs is commonly done prophylactically, and at a relatively early stage in wear. Think of the valve springs in an engine, how many cycles before replacement? Ever?? So depending on the app, springs can have a very long service life.
 

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Carry that ole gun @Jeff119k. As long as it is maintained, not an issue.
 

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Nope. If it functions properly and meets the criteria you want for your EDC (capacity, weight, sights, etc), you’re good to go. My EDC is a 20ish year old P229, which is built on a P228 frame. It’s the perfect feeling pistol for me. Works just fine, so I’m not going to keep it in the safe just because of its age.
 

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I have a Colt 1911 (not an A1) that went through an arsenal re-build in the early fifties. It shoots reliably today, although I use low pressure target rounds, certainly not modern .45 ACP +P. I also have a 1935 Walther PPK that eats up modern .32 ACP rounds all day long. I replaced the recoil springs in both pistols after I purchased them, and I watch for wear after firing (which admittedly isn't often), but neither pistol was deteriorated with age (the same can't be said about me).
 

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If well maintained and springs have been freshened a gun will last hundreds of years. It really boils down to how long can you get parts like springs and replacing them as needed or scheduled.

I have retired guns that I can no longer get springs or parts for. They are all over 100 years old.
 

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If I had 2 identical guns on a nightstand. One of them was 40 years old, and the other one was brand new with no rounds through it.

And over the years I had put a few thousand rounds through the 40 year old gun without having any problems.

You hear a noise, and you realize you're about to be in a life or death situation.

Which gun are you reaching for? The old one that is proven to be reliable. Or the new one that is untested.

Until I shoot a gun and it shows me it is reliable, it isn't.
 
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