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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Like many in here, I'm sure, I grew up around guns and shooting. I began hunting at the ripe old age of 15, and b/c I grew up around guns shooting practically my whole life, even being trained how to shoot and service weapons in the military, I honestly thought I new how to shoot; and I did! I could drop a deer at 350 yards, no sweat! I could waste paper targets taking my time for accuracy trying to put multiple bullets through the same hole and all that.

Even today, when I go to the range the overwhelming majority of people I see shooting do this. I watch and survey the shooting line to see who looks like they know what they're doing vs those who clearly have no clue, but don't want you to know they don't. LOL!!! We've all been there and have seen them. But it wasn't until about five years ago that I really began to learn and get into what I called "defensive" shooting, which was when I realized I may know how to shoot and clean a gun, but I didn't know anything about living a lifestyle of how to carry a gun and shoot for my life. I really don't recall what got me to thinking about it, but it finally hit me. Defense doesn't just mean guns. It's an entire mindset. It's a complete lifestyle. It's a way of life, and if it isn't then your odds of surviving a deadly encounter are slim to none at best. Basic military training teaches you how to shoot a gun, how to clean it, and you may be given some basic combat training, but until you are put to that test you really don't know how to use a gun. The title of the post is "How to Carry A Gun and Shoot Like A Navy SEAL". Why? B/c it is a lifestyle with those guys.

SEALs don't just go to the range and pop a few rounds for a hobby. They don't just try to shoot for accuracy. They live it, day in, day out, and they don't just shoot guns. They learn tactics and they practice them routinely so that their actions become instinct rather than having to think about what to do next under stress. Unlike conventional soldiers who ramp up with training before a deployment, SEALs practice stress often, and they put themselves to the test in a number of ways, almost daily, so they stay sharp; and their odds of winning are high. Below is a link to a site one Navy SEAL has to teach people how to shoot like a Navy SEAL so that if/when you find yourself in a life/death situation which requires you to act, you're not left with the work of your hobby.

What are some things you do to practice when you're not at the range shooting? What do you think about when you're home alone...do you practice then? Do you have a plan of egress and do you know what you would do, or even attempt to do, should you be awakened by an intruder? None of us really knows exactly how we'll respond to life/death situations, but one thing is for sure. If you do not practice and train to handle it your odds of surviving are not good. Share your thoughts, ideas and training with the forum. Maybe you will help someone develop a better plan.

https://chrissajnog.com/
 
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Chris Sajnog is the real deal. I subscribe to his youtube channel, and he has a lot of great content.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I agree! He's smart, experienced, and down to earth. You can tell he really has a passion for teaching others how to be more proficient with their abilities.
 

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Typically, what I have noticed, is that people tend to have "an" option, not options.

I trained for years in Martial Arts, however, while I am well trained to handle hand to hand situations I will utilize weapons I have or are around me.

Still, I could use more stress related firearm training. I am comfortable with my tools, but not necessarily employment of them in high stress situations.

I have targeted this year to do some additional training.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Typically, what I have noticed, is that people tend to have "an" option, not options.

I trained for years in Martial Arts, however, while I am well trained to handle hand to hand situations I will utilize weapons I have or are around me.

Still, I could use more stress related firearm training. I am comfortable with my tools, but not necessarily employment of them in high stress situations.

I have targeted this year to do some additional training.
I think you're right, and I agree, most folks don't have "options". That is one reason I posted the link to Chris' site b/c he talks about ways to increase your training options at home. Still, though, I would love to have access to facilities that allow me to train often. Cost is a factor, though. I suspect this is true for most.
 
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