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How do you resize your .357 SIG cases?

  • Full Length Sizing to fit a Case Gauge

    Votes: 12 54.5%
  • Full Length Sizing to satisfy the "Plunk Test"

    Votes: 5 22.7%
  • Partial Full Length Sizing to enable Full Battery

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • I'm an experienced handloader with many years experience, but don't want to share information

    Votes: 4 18.2%
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Not really trying to overthink things - it's just that these cases can be treated as miniature rifle rounds, and I speculate approach #3 may be best for maximizing brass life.







1. Full - Length Sizing to fit a Case Gauge







2. Full - Length Sizing to satisfy the "Plunk Test."









3. Partial Full - Length Sizing to enable Full Battery.

https://thefiringline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=469020

That's how much 1/8 turn of the die bumps the shoulders back (image on the right); not quite "Full Plunk," :lol: but my pistol loads and cycles securely.

This is a common practice among folks who handload for bolt guns. Lots of arguments for and against it, many difficult to validate...
 

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I don't have a dog in this fight, so I'm in for curiosity's sake.

I'm betting the folks who shoot the .357 Sig will end up overwhelmingly going for #2. I think this is a mistake as it only shows you if the rounds will chamber in your particular barrel. If you buy another gun in this caliber or give a few rounds to a buddy, they may or may not work. If you do #1, they'll work in anybody's barrel, assuming the barrel is up to SAAMI specs.

If I reloaded .357 Sig, I'd go for #1 but that's just me and I didn't vote because I don't do this caliber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm betting the folks who shoot the .357 Sig will end up overwhelmingly going for #2.
That's what I've been encountering most frequently online.

We probably tend to invest more time getting the perfect handload for our favorite "pet gun." :lol:

You're right - approaches #2 and #3 would "personalize" these cases to a certain barrel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I haven't reloaded 357Sig yet, but I have all the gear to do it.
Me too.

I've been fiddling around with several dummy rounds using approach #3 - they seem to cycle reliably, but I'm waiting for someone to tell me this isn't a good idea.

For the time being, I'm only loading for one .357 SIG pistol.
 

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What if you sell that gun, or get a new favorite, or that particular barrel develops a defect...just too many possibilities to paint yourself into a corner.
 

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Yeah, how'd you like to get the whole thing perfected using #2 or #3 and load up 500 or more rounds and then end up with another gun that wouldn't chamber them.

That would be a major PITA taking all those rounds down and doing them over.
 

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I reload using a Dillon 550B with Dillon carbide dies. I shoot .357SIG in P224, P226, P229 and P239 barrels. I lube my cases before resizing, and check each loaded round in a case guage. The Dillon dies resize the entire case, neck and body. I am happy that I have never had a problem during case guage checking or shooting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
 

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Been reloading the 357 Sig for almost a year now without any issues so far. Load on a Dillon 550B with Dillon carbide dies. Anyone contemplating loading this round. make sure you have 357 Sig bullet heads and 9 mm heads. The sig bullets are longer than the 9's to seat properly in the sig neck.
 

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Definitely number one.

I have loaded and shot in the thousands of 357 SIG now and I shoot it in my 226, and my M&P, and will probably get a barrel for my Glock 20 at some point.

I have made the mistake in the past of using my gun chamber to fit rounds. They fit in the chamber but wouldn't feed worth a dang because of the OAL being a tad long.

SAAMI all the way on pistol rounds.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
 

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Definitely #1 and that is the case gauge I use. I started with one of my barrels and I kept having issues until I better understood the inside of this gauge. Now I have zero issues with 357Sig (about 1000 rounds loaded, shot) in a P226, P320 and my new 1911 XO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
 

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Currently doing just the plunk test as I dont have a case gauge to test with at the moment. Once I get another gun in 357SIG I will probably invest in one to make my loads more uniform. Loading currently on a Dillon 550B with Lee dies and have loaded about 300 rounds so far with no issues in my P250C.
 

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I voted #2.

I full length resize, but do not have a case gauge.

My die is set up to insert the case into the die as far as possible. The shell plate contacts the bottom of the die. That is the way it is intended to be set up. If the loaded round does not fit another chamber, I am not sure that the problem can be fixed by adjusting the die.

When loading for a new/different gun it is always wise to check the round with the chamber before loading a lot of ammo.
 

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None of the options fit so I picked #4 at random.

I screw the full length sizing die down til it touches the case jaws (yes, I have a Forster, yes, I use it to load pistol cartridges), then screw it about 1/4 turn in further, as the instructions state. I have no case gauge, nor have I ever plunk tested a round in my P226 .357, they all work (when I don't crush the case in some bizarre fashion, usually during seating or crimping). Now that I have a die set up that works I don't change it, at least until Speer decides to release some of those precious, precious 147 gr Gold Dots to us mere mortals ever again.

No, I don't use this method on most bottleneck rifle cases (or straight wall pistol cases, for that matter), that involves lots of magical wonders like customized carbide sizing buttons, bushings, gauges and other instruments of sheer, lovecraftian insanity. I do enjoy having one cartridge that just plain works (.357 SIG).
 
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