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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What do you do to become a better shooter, responder, defender, fighter, etc.? Here Travis Haley talks about a personal experience and the notion of how sharing these experiences helps others become better at whatever they choose to do, whether it's a cop, responsible conceal carrier, etc., but the same formula can also carry over into how to be a better person, husband, wife, student, employee, leader, boss, etc. How is it that we go about seeking the knowledge we need to be better? Just something to ponder. Hope you have a great day!

 

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I'm a simple man. Years ago, I read what Marshall Wyatt Earp had to say about fighting with a handgun. As regards to speed, he said, "Make haste, slowly." As he used his Buntline Special as a club, over the heads of drunks and brawlers, little is known other than that already stated. What is known, is that he was NOT a gunfighter. He only shot, when he had his sight picture. He was fearless, meticulous, accurate, and did not waste shots. He'd noticed, from watching gunfighters, that the fastest, usually fired in front of his intended victim. Hence, "Make haste, slowly..."

Again, being old, decrepit, of limited movement and stamina, I take the late Marshall's advice and example to heart, and no longer being "fast," I "Make haste, slowly..."
 

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I'm a simple man. Years ago, I read what Marshall Wyatt Earp had to say about fighting with a handgun. As regards to speed, he said, "Make haste, slowly." As he used his Buntline Special as a club, over the heads of drunks and brawlers, little is known other than that already stated. What is known, is that he was NOT a gunfighter. He only shot, when he had his sight picture. He was fearless, meticulous, accurate, and did not waste shots. He'd noticed, from watching gunfighters, that the fastest, usually fired in front of his intended victim. Hence, "Make haste, slowly..."

Again, being old, decrepit, of limited movement and stamina, I take the late Marshall's advice and example to heart, and no longer being "fast," I "Make haste, slowly..."
Slow is smooth. Smooth is fast.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't think Haley speaks of trying to be fast...it was more in line with being aware and not getting yourself in to trouble by being complacent.
 

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One of the best books I have read on situational awareness is “Left of Bang”.

https://www.amazon.com/Left-Bang-Ma...8&qid=1508381278&sr=8-1&keywords=left+of+bang

“Left of Bang is born from the blood and fire lessons of Marines in combat. The learning curve is short in the fight and failure often means death. Seeing, recognizing, and acting on danger before the hammer falls is what Left of Bang is all about. To that end, Patrick Van Horne and Jason A. Riley have set forth lessons of human ability and conduct in conflict. These actions and concepts apply to each of us who fight the good fight against enemies who seek our destruction. Whether military, police, or citizen defender, to win the battle we must find a way to intercept the enemy and deter his plans–a tough challenge against an enemy who is often hiding in plain sight. Left of Bang contains answers to detection, deterrence, and ultimate victory. This is a warrior’s book. Get it, read it, live it.”
– Jeff Chudwin, Chief of Police (ret.), President, Illinois Tactical Officers Association

Left of Bang is broken down into five parts, and although it is only 200 pages, it is jam-packed from cover to cover with invaluable information that will help anyone stay safe. "Left of Bang" focuses on the profiling aspect, the ability to "recognize the subtle aspects of human behavior," which occur within all cultures, "to find the enemy hiding in plain clothes." (pg 25) These are the same skills that help us locate and respond to danger prior to the "bang."
 

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Practice .. Any kind !! Doesn't have to be hours a day but practice something everyday !!

My wife and I go over our responses to several different scenarios we might encounter in our daily lives several times a month .. simply being aware of your surroundings may/can keep you from harm in most instances .. but continuously reminding ourselves what we should be looking for reinforces our awareness ..
 

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Shoot, often.

Probably going to start a fight here - but I believe there's merit to the statement that actively participating in competitive shooting helps improve your skillset.

Sure, it's simulated stress - but it's more stress when you're up against the buzzer with the knowledge that your scores will be up for all to see than when you're alone at the range with all the time in the world to practice perfect trigger discipline.

It's only when you push yourself that you find the limits of your capabilities.
 

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What a lot of new, and experienced, shooter do is go to the range, fire a bunch of rounds down range and leave. No thought of if their grip is correct or their trigger pull is correct or their reloading methods are correct, etc. "Let's punch holes in paper and go home."

Perfect practice for each and every part of your shooting drills.
 

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In Cal Ripkin Jr.'s book "The Only Way I Know", he tells his father's mantra about practice: It's not "practice makes perfect" but "PERFECT practice makes perfect".

I know we're not talking about baseball but I believe the discipline is transferable.
Love this quote!
 
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