SIG Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,372 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Holster Conversations
April 3, 2017
Cornered Cat by Kathy Jackson


It seems to me that a lot of times we-in-the-training-community think we are helping people make a choice between a barely functional holster or an excellent one.

But from the other person’s perspective, they are actually making a choice between an affordable, readily-available holster or leaving the gun at home.

This mistaken understanding of the options on the table often leads to confusion and resentment on both sides of the conversation.

This confusion sometimes leads to a bit of resentful mockery: “Why won’t you foolish people use the gear we recommend??!” vs “Why do you people keep acting like snobs in your gear recommendations!?”

(I truly hope that I have never fallen into either one of those traps, but being human it’s very, very likely that I have.)

But this whole thing is one reason I spend so much time educating people about the very basic functions of a carry holster. Any product designed to carry a gun for defensive use in ordinary life must do these basic things:

  • Cover the trigger guard completely with something sturdy enough to keep the trigger from moving if something brushes up against the outside of the holster;
  • Hold the gun securely enough that we can trust that the trigger will stay covered at all times, that the gun will stay in the same orientation at all times, and that the user can visit the bathroom without having to take the gun out of its carry location (so that the gun will reliably not fall to the floor if the holster gets inadvertently tipped upside down and shaken gently); and
  • Allow the user to access the gun when they need it.

These are the non-reducible minimums for safe and responsible concealed carry. As long as a proposed holster does all these things, it is a “good” holster.

After those minimums are met, we can start talking about the benefits and trade offs of specific holsters and carry methods. We can discuss hard-sided versus soft-sided options (and yes, there are ways to protect the trigger when wearing a soft product). We can debate “How fast is fast enough?” when it comes to accessing the gun. We can measure the speed differences between carry designs worn in different places on the body. We can talk about durability of design and materials. We can discuss minor differences in design that make a big difference in speed, comfort, or concealability.

But none of those things matter until the minimums are met.

And once the minimums are met? It’s all gravy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,844 Posts
Your second point has a issue. With a heavy firearm (I normally carry a 239 or 229) once the belt is loose, and the pants unzipped, the whole rig is going to the floor real quick.
It is not unusual for me to remove the weapon, put it on the toilet roll holder, and then lower the pants.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Willard

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,588 Posts
Your second point has a issue. With a heavy firearm (I normally carry a 239 or 229) once the belt is loose, and the pants unzipped, the whole rig is going to the floor real quick.
It is not unusual for me to remove the weapon, put it on the toilet roll holder, and then lower the pants.
Don't take the gun out of the holster. My .02.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,289 Posts
Your second point has a issue. With a heavy firearm (I normally carry a 239 or 229) once the belt is loose, and the pants unzipped, the whole rig is going to the floor real quick.
It is not unusual for me to remove the weapon, put it on the toilet roll holder, and then lower the pants.
I get your point, but if you have the right carry holster removing your pistol can be done safely, without removing it from the holster. Things like this should be discussed in these type conversations so that people are given sufficient information to make an "informed" decision rather than being told "this is what you need to buy," which just sounds like a snake oil sales pitch. Your point is extremely valid, and it has a very practical solution.

I carry my gun in an INCOG Eclipse IWB holster that can be put at any number of practical positions for safe carry. It exceeds the requirements listed by MC, and it is relatively inexpensive compared to some custom made leather rigs. I find myself restricting my gun complement based on whether or not this manufacturer makes a holster for the gun b/c I like it that much. As MC said, I have gotten rid of guns b/c I could not find a suitable holster system for it.

The one thing I like about the INCOG, over everything else, is that I can safely don it very quickly, but I can remove it even quicker, but just as safely, with one hand. That makes it extremely safe, convenient and versatile, which is a HUGE factor for me. It has a number of other features that I like a lot, but that one is top tier. This, for me, is definitely a conversation that should be a MUST in all firearms training classes for beginners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,844 Posts
For my 229, the best holster for me is a OWB Bianchi M 82.
For my S&W 66, the only holster I have is a STRONG OWB with thumb break.

IF I am using the IWB for the 229 or 239, Then I remove holster and weapon. But for the Belted Holsters that are actually more comfortable, I don't pull off the belt.

People, Quit being afraid of a Loaded gun. ND's are a result of carelessness.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,289 Posts
People, Quit being afraid of a Loaded gun. ND's are a result of carelessness.
Sometimes the strangest things can happen when laying a gun down in a bathroom stall, or on a sink, or the back of the toilet, etc. It's not that I, personally, am afraid of a ND. I just don't like laying a naked gun on something that is prone to allow a unintended nudge, bump from another stall, floor, etc., but to each his own.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,684 Posts
Those three fundamental criteria...........would seem to be meet by all the various manufacturers I have looked at..............or not? After that.........just personal preference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
248 Posts
After raising three children one thing that I have learned, It's human nature to find things out the hard way. Even after given proper instruction.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,289 Posts
Those three fundamental criteria...........would seem to be meet by all the various manufacturers I have looked at..............or not? After that.........just personal preference?
Sure! There are lots of good holsters out there that fit the criteria, but most beginners have absolutely no idea. For instance, one thing that makes a huge difference, even with a quality holster that fits the criteria, is a good "gun" belt. I'm speaking from personal experience as someone who has always made it a point to buy quality belts, but they do not hold up as well as the belts that are made specifically for carrying the weight and pull of a gun. Some people will shrug it off b/c they have not taken the time to actually see for themselves the difference a good gun belt makes, and, as the result, will tell you it doesn't matter. They have to be convinced that it does matter, so as MC said, it ought to be covered as part of a course. It's not only a matter of holding the gun firm on your waist. If you have a collapsing, thin belt on which the clip of the holster does not snap into place, the difference can be catastrophic. It can be the difference btwn pulling a holstered gun vs drawing a weapon that is ready to fight.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,289 Posts
  • Like
Reactions: Trave1ingEast
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top