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Discussion Starter #21
My newly bought first firearm wasn't working too ya know!. 馃槣
never had issues in the past because always got to use now own my dads old shotguns and rifles. first hand gun. its like a whole different thing. lol
 

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never had issues in the past because always got to use now own my dads old shotguns and rifles. first hand gun. its like a whole different thing. lol
Haha! true dat!

After building my first AR with scope, went to the range to sight it. I went home frustrated because it wasn't zeroing. So took the manual out and read on how to zero a scope. And what do you know! I was adjusting the Up/Down and Right/Left interchangeably! 馃槀
 

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Got it. Thank you!!
Have not owned a P224 but do own P225s, P226, P220, P228, and M11A1. It's tougher on the thumb but it is possible to release the slide on an empty magazine; what you're doing is depressing the magazine follower with the slide release - the piece pushed up by the empty mag's follower which arrests the forward motion of the slide, i.e. locks the slide back - using your thumb muscles or whichever digit you choose.:) Depending on the individual pistol this may be easier said than done.
Welcome from Mississippi!
 

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First, keep ammo away from the gun while you troubleshoot this. Away meaning other room. And too, it is advisable to not let a slide slam home on an empty chamber.

For you with this particular gun, I would recommend using the slingshot method. But generally with semi-autos some people prefer slingshot and some like to release with the lever (if they can) - both ways are acceptable provided you exercise muzzle control.

When the guy on the video gets involved in a customer decision, he is dealing with first-time firearm owners so it's safe to say that most of these perspective buyers are handling a semi-auto for the first time and must be taught how to use it. Most all people handling a semi for the first time will not have the simultaneous coordination and strength required to depress the slide release lever to release the slide and keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction. It's easier and SAFER to teach and use the slingshot method. You don't want to see an inexperienced shooter on the firing line to empty a mag and then hesitantly have to point a gun sideways to insert a mag and press buttons to get it into battery. That sideways-pointed and now loaded gun will be pointed at someone's head. Easier and safer to teach the slingshot method at least at first.

Once you gain experience, how you release the slide is PREFERENCE and the preference is largely dictated on how the gun's release lever is designed and your ability to comfortably depress the lever. With some guns it is more difficult to use the lever.

Regardless of preference on how you release the slide, IT SHOULD still BE POSSIBLE to be able to press the lever to release the slide whether there's an empty mag, full mag, or no mag. Unless the actual design of the gun prevents depressing the lever like the S&W shown in the video seems to have. Some levers like those on the Beretta 92 have a nice comfortable ledge that is easily caught by the thumb and some levers are actually are recessed. Levers on classic Sigs - they are not recessed but there's not much of a ledge either.

My early experience with semi-autos is with the Beretta 92 so I am a lever pusher. What I have found with classic-P Sigs like your P224 is that the friction between the lever and the slide notch is a main reason that the lever cannot seemingly be depressed one-handed. Combine the friction between the two surfaces, forward pressure from the recoil spring and upward pressure from the mag spring (follower), it can be tough to overcome those forces to operate the small lever with the thumb.

Being a lever pusher, on all of my Sigs it was necessary for me to smooth the small mating surface on the slide with an Arkansas stone so the release lever slides on a smooth surface instead of scraping on rough Nitron-coated flash left from the manufacturing process.

So either way is acceptable. Just like it says on pg 23 of your gun's manual.
https://www.sigsauer.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Classic_Line.pdf
 

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When the magazine follower is pushing up on the slide release lever you have the force of the magazine spring to overcome when you try and release things. When there's a round in there, you're not dealing with that added force since the lever isn't pushed up by a round, but instead by the magazine follower. On a new gun, there could well be an area that is still slightly rough from it's original machining, and that sometimes takes time or a gunsmith to evaluate and smooth out.

In either case, the method of pulling the slide back and letting it go (don't ride the slide into battery - let it use it's recoil spring to close itself) is a better tactical one unless you've trained to use the slide release and it's comfortable.

Every handgun design is a bit different, but generally variations on a theme or two. But every individual gun is a bit different too because of the hand work involved in manufacturing many of the designs. Some get more attention, some less.
 

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thanks. I guess I'm one of those newbies .....
The slide release on your SIG is very much designed to release the slide when pressed. That video is just one way to manipulate the slide. The P224 has a smaller release and they can be stiff when they are new. Like others have said it will loosen over time and is much easier when an empty magazine is not inserted. Enjoy the 224 it's a great little weapon.
 
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