SIG Talk banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have thought about using a dry lube for my SIG 938 because it seems to be a way to keep dirt and dust from being attracted by wet lube and because it seems like a cool thing to try.

I have not tried dry lube, however, because it just seems like a bad idea for some reason.

Yesterday, a guy at a local gun store made a good point against using dry lube saying that if the dry lube wears away from a spot on the gun, it won't be "replaced" by another lubed piece of the gun rubbing against it. To me, this wins the argument in favor of NOT using dry lubes.

Does anyone reading this use dry lube?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,289 Posts
The notion that dirt is going to be attracted by a wet lube more so than a dry lube is really unfounded. The lube I use is a synthetic that repels dirt, and many others do the same. Not sure dry lube is going to repel anything, but it certainly isn't going to do it better than the others. Besides that, unless you drop your gun in a mud hole or sand trap, the odds of a little dirt causing a problem is slim. I don't use dry lube simply b/c it doesn't make sense to me. I mean "lube" and "dry" are 180 out...how can dry lube anything? Granted I understand the premise behind it all, but like the one guy said, it's not going to move around and "lube" like a wet lubricant will. Some are better than others, of course, but still...I think just about any of them would be better than a dry compound.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,827 Posts
Lubes are dependent on the use and the environment. In areas (like we are engaged in the middle east) Dust is a real and present danger to the operations of firearms.

The attitude against Grease in firearms goes back to the 60s, when the AR 15 was first entered into the world of combat. Initial instructions were to not clean the rifle, Not to lube it and to use the ammunition provided.

Wrong ammo powder, wrong attitude toward cleaning and poor instructions of troops.

My dad was a "Heavy Lube" and a "Grease Lover" from the 1940s. He used them because they displaced and adhered. And his experience in jungle of the Pacific told him that this was the best way to treat a weapon.

I got into Dri Slide and thought it was the Cat's pajamas. But while it lubericated, it didn't do anything to keep contaminants out. Hmm.

So I finally compromised. Grease on things that slide. Bolts, Slides, Rails of weapons. If it spins, I get Break free on it.

IT works for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Dry lubricants have their place but I don't think firearms are one of them. I'll stick with oil or grease.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
378 Posts
Hmmm, after reading the preceding posts I had one thought. A dry lube might be appropriate in very cold climates. However, a break free (GI version of it) lubed M16 functioned well during winter training in Alaska many, many years ago.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
22,754 Posts
In extremely sandy conditions grease can and will turn into lapping compound.
For most of us lube and grease is a good thing.

Great, now we have to worry about Johnny running his SIG dry....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,772 Posts
Hmmm, after reading the preceding posts I had one thought. A dry lube might be appropriate in very cold climates. However, a break free (GI version of it) lubed M16 functioned well during winter training in Alaska many, many years ago.
When it hit around -40 degrees or lower in Alaska, I removed all lube and went with graphite.

You had to at those temperatures in those days.

These days you can buy l=synthetic lubricants that work well down to -60 degrees or so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,425 Posts
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top