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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There seem to be a lot of these posts, and I feel like the responses are not always as precise as they could be, or the advice is good but pieced out over the thread, so I wanted to try and create a post that might get stickied.

Here is a picture of my "Sig" shooting low.


When I first bought the pistol it was worse. Generally hitting at the very bottom or below the paper. As it turns out, my sight picture was wrong.

POINT 1: The vast majority of Sigs use a "combat sight" picture. This means that the dot on your front sight post should cover your intended target.

If you are using a Center Hold
or Six O'Clock Hold Sight picture
, you will hit low.

These are incorrect sight pictures for a Sig (from the factory). They may have worked fine with whatever pistol or rifle you have/had/tried once and liked, but it is not the sight picture Sig intends for their pistols and will not work on a stock Sig.
I don't intended to debate the merits of it, just know this is how Sigs are setup from the factory. Sigs from the factory are set up to use a combat sight picture at 10 yards. Closer or farther than that and the ballistics won't match up. Once I understood what the sight picture was supposed to look like, I got "on the paper", but was still well below where I should have been. See above.



This is the same pistol, shot from a cheap plastic bench rest I purchased to test what I felt I already knew.

POINT 2: Your trigger work might not be as awesome as you had hoped. (mine sure wasn't) I have a tendency (like many people) to anticipate recoil and yank the pistol down, resulting in low shots. Perfect trigger pull is actually not common, it takes practice. If you haven't shot much before, or haven't shot much recently/for awhile, get or borrow a bench. You can purchase a bench online for about one third of what a new set of sights cost (or half of what one sight costs). Shooting from a bench will help give you a good idea how much your trigger pull is affecting your results and should be recommended by anyone before you start looking at purchasing a new set of sight(s). The below is an excellent starting point. It shows some of the many mistakes a right handed shooter can make and the error in shot placement that results.




"But my friend's P22# has #X and #X sights on it and he does fine with it! And so do I! My P22# came from the factory with #X-2 and #X-1 sights on it. Some idiot at the factory just grabbed random sights out of a bin and Sig did it wrong."

POINT 3: Sig puts particular sights on particular models/batches at the factory purposefully. Just because your new pistol doesn't match what you saw on the internet, doesn't mean it's wrong. The pistol above with the just fine bench results came with a #6 front and #6 rear sight (it happens to be a P229 Legion). A quick Google will garner for you that a P229 in 9mm should come with a #6 front and #8 rear. Or maybe a #8 front and a #8 rear, depending on the post that you find.

The fact is that Sig batch tests and picks a combo that works for the test pistols from that batch. It's likely not a perfect system. The test pistols could be poorly chosen and not representative of the rest of the batch, or the pistol you bought might not be representative of the rest of the batch. You can call Sig, give them your serial number (on recent models) and they can pull up what batch it was in and what sight combo was chosen for that batch. However, until you bench shoot it (or develop/insure perfect trigger pull) you won't know if that combo works for your pistol. I should note here that I hear customer service is hit and miss. Some people have not had luck with Sig reps. The one I spoke to was nice a easily pulled up the required info. He also offered to take the pistol back in and have them "accuracy test" it to check it. I opted to buy a bench rest myself and save the mailing time. If I had found the sights were not correct, I would politely send the pistol back to Sig and expect them to get the right sights on it (for free).


Caveats to all this mess:
If you bought a used Sig, anything is possible. On a newer used pistol, you can call Sig and see what they put on at the factory. On an older model that doesn't seem to match POA with POI, lots is possible, but bench shooting will give you a better place to start from (and end your testing with). There are good and bad posts and articles out there about sight heights and how to make adjustments. This one I found particularly informative. If you are going to pay $60 (or more) to start swapping the sights on your pistol, make sure you understand the sight heights and what you expect the swap to do. There are people out there who can give you great or poor advice, but your best bet is to make sure you understand the information yourself before you change anything.
 

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I cant see your pictures for some reason, but otherwise a good post, very Informative to the novice pistol shooter.

I might add: Bullet weight will also effect your POI elevation. Heavier bullets will usually hit higher and light for caliber usually lower. This is very evident in my revolvers.
 

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All signs hit low from the factory.
It is so you don't get upset when you hit your targets
We don't want you to cry when you see the bleeding.
 
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...but some Sigs do hit low.
Top target is my Mk25 from 20 yards. Hits where it should.
Next down is a new acquisition I'm trying to work out. It was from 15 yards.
Next down was target #2 pistol from 5 yards.

Also, take note of ALL the tape just below the splatter targets. I had to pull my ole' faithful out to verify it was the gun and not me having a bad day.

Know your gun, know your ammo.


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

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SIGs usually hit the bulls eye.
 

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I thought my sig 1911 was "sighted low" but my friend... Who has several 1911s (including a 1916 1911 and a 1944 1911) proved me wrong...I was just " anticipated the recoil" as you pointed out...

He shot it fine. And dead center aiming just as you say in the second hold picture (" center hold").

I also shot his 1944 Colt.. Very nice gun!



Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 

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I've had like 10 out of 30 that shot 3-4" low at 25yds and I have a box of #8 rear sights that I changed for #10's. The ones I've been getting lately seem to be ok however.
 

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I just want to add to point #2. I never try to adjust/swap sights on a new gun till at least the third time I shoot it.

I have 25 handguns, 20 of them took more than one range session to get used to. Only three of those needed any adjustment, as revealed by bench shooting. The other 17 just needed some getting used to.

Also; I never use bench results to make adjustments. I adjust a gun for how it shoots in my hand.

With defense weapons, I lean more toward getting on target fast than accuracy. I lose an inch or two by using a Orange Trijicon HD front sight, but I get on target 100% faster. I set my range/target guns up for the best accuracy, as I can spare an extra second focusing a thin front sight.

I no longer worry whether a handgun has night sights or not. If I can see the target, I can see a Trijicon HD sight. If not, I need a light to identify the target. Night sights are pretty much meaningless for a range gun.
 

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I've had like 10 out of 30 that shot 3-4" low at 25yds and I have a box of #8 rear sights that I changed for #10's. The ones I've been getting lately seem to be ok however.
I've got 1 out of 8 I own that shoots 3/4" low at 7 yards and I've shot another 10 belonging to people I know that didn't shoot low either.

The vast majority of Sigs don't shoot low at all, they shoot to point of aim.
 

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I didn't think my p226 shot low until I picked it up after putting 350 rounds through my HK. I need to remember my sight picture.
 

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Funny, I never gave it much thought aiming at 6 o'clock, combat hold etc. whenever I take a new gun out to fire I would hold sights over bulls and slowly adjust from there if needed. Usually I wouldn't have to. I guess my sigs are sighted in using a combat hold. But, I do not have vision in my left eye (non dominant eye thankfully) so I'd assume my poa is different than those with two good eyes. Anyway. I'd never given it much thought at the range but am now very aware of where I am aiming and taking notes. I love this the collective knowledge found on this site
 

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From Sig's website.....


"My SIG SAUER pistol is not accurate. Why? What should I do"?

"All SIG SAUER production duty/combat pistols are set up to use a “combat” sight picture. This is where the front sight completely covers the bullseye of the target. Using a six o’clock (“pumpkin on a post”) or center mass (“half’n’half”) sight picture will result in low impact. SIG SAUER, Inc sights in all non-sporting and non-target pistols for 2 inch groupings @ 10 yards. If you are still having trouble please contact Customer Service for further help and instruction. Please have your serial number ready. There are also very helpful free Internet sites that cover pistol group analysis".


I have always used the "Center Hold", also called half and half, where the top half of the ten ring sits on top of my front sight.
But it appears that Sig sets up their sights where the front dot completely covers the ten ring.
This P365-MS is my first Sig in 30 years, so I learned something new today.
 

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Sorry but this popped into my head when I read the title.

Does your Sig shoot low

Does it wobble to and fro

Can you tie it in a knot

Can you tie it in a bow

Can you throw it over your shoulder like a continental soldier

Does your Sig shoot low?



We now return you to your regularly scheduled Sigtalk.
 

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Sig Academy Marksmanship class confirmed combat hold on all Sig pistols. Cover spot on target with front sight where you want bullet to impact. We did drill with two shooters during class, first shooter put shot anywhere on target. Second shooter had three chances to put round on paper touching or through first shooters point of impact. Instructor kept saying, cover hole made by shooter one entirely with your front sight and squeeze.

Combat sight image for the win.
 
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