SIG Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi All - I am purchasing a P226 9mm Legion which will be used as my primary home defense weapon in addition to shooting at the ranch, etc (I won't carry or shoot competition). I am also an avid 1911 fan so I typically shoot in SAO at our ranch.

I like the thought of having a SA/DA in case I'm sweeping through the house and need to de-cock it. I worry that on an SAO the hammer could slip when trying to let it down. However I like the fact you can keep it "cocked & locked" in SAO mode and worry about the DAO not having a safety (even though the gun will be locked up in a safe)

I've hat SA/DA's in the past and never really utilized a DA feature on a semi auto but like having it there. I wish they made the SA/DA with a safety, other than a 10lb trigger pull.

I've bounced this around or weeks and am ready to make a decision - any input is appreciated. Thank you all in advance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,137 Posts
Hi All - I am purchasing a P226 9mm Legion which will be used as my primary home defense weapon in addition to shooting at the ranch, etc (I won't carry or shoot competition). I am also an avid 1911 fan so I typically shoot in SAO at our ranch.

I like the thought of having a SA/DA in case I'm sweeping through the house and need to de-cock it. I worry that on an SAO the hammer could slip when trying to let it down. However I like the fact you can keep it "cocked & locked" in SAO mode and worry about the DAO not having a safety (even though the gun will be locked up in a safe)

I've hat SA/DA's in the past and never really utilized a DA feature on a semi auto but like having it there. I wish they made the SA/DA with a safety, other than a 10lb trigger pull.

I've bounced this around or weeks and am ready to make a decision - any input is appreciated. Thank you all in advance.
Think of the DA/SA Sig as a DA revolver that rewards you for taking the first shot DA by giving you all the following shots SA without having to cock the hammer each time.:) Throw in a decocker to add some safety for lowering the hammer when done. No safety on the wheel gun either. The single disadvantage to this scheme being that the shooter must master the transition from DA to SA - decocking every other shot at the range, so you are shooting DA, SA, DA, SA etc through the whole mag is a good excercise.

With your SAO, why would you consider lowering the hammer when sweeping the house? If the danger has abated or gone away, lowering the hammer means you have to pull the trigger, while blocking the hammer, and while this can obviously be done with no mistakes, it does present the potential for error. Would it not be better to simply push the safety up/on. The safety is quick, sure, as safe as carrying condition 1 ('cause that's what it is!) and in the heat of the moment less risk of fumble fingers so more doable safely. Plus, should it turn out you were too hasty in backing off on the firepower, flicking the safety to off is quick and again more error free than manually cocking the hammer.

I recently purchased 4 used 1911's, 3 of them had damaged sears due to repeated dropping the hammer onto the half cock notch. These guns were all low round count in excellent condition - I have no idea what kind of manual or arms the previous owner was doing, but it had to have included much manual hammer manipulation with lots of slipping.

The P226 / P229 are great guns. Mine are in 40/357.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
It sounds to me like you're not sold on the DA/SA concept so I recommend you stick with what you are comfortable with. Get the SAO. No need for a decocker on a SAO pistol. That's what the safety is for. No need for a safety on a DA/SA pistol either. That's what the decocker is for.

I think the alleged trauma of transitioning from DA to SA trigger pull is way overblown. I think folks read about it on the internet and in gun rags and become convinced it's some sort of godawful problem. Much ado about nothing IMO. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,552 Posts
There's really no reason to have a safety on a DA/SA SIG. The DA pull is the safety.



Get whatever you are used to doing. If you most often shoot 1911's, then the SAO will be exactly what you are already accustomed to.


You're not kidding there. I usually don't decock my 226 at the range so I really didn't fully appreciate the effort it takes to get off a shot in DA until last week when I spent some time shooting DA. First shot missed the target entirely. But of course with practice, all is good. But it certainly would seem a safety is totally unnecessary.
 
  • Like
Reactions: bblr and bumper

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,280 Posts
If you want a DA/SA gun with a safety then buy a Beretta.

Forgive how I'm about to say this, but,If your a 1911 guy then for the love of God why are you lowering the hammer on a live chamber? Are you asking for an AD??? Leave it cocked and locked. If I understood your post you want to lower the hammer each time you go from one room to another?? That is called "put the thumb safety back on and keep your finger straight."

No offense meant with this but if you think you need a safety on a DA/SA then you should really shoot more and become accustom to things. The definition of a safety is "a mechanical device that can and WILL fail" People rely on the false sense of security when it comes to safeties on firearms. Number 1 rule is keep your finger off the bang switch until your ready to use it. When the gun is in the holster, how will it shoot itself??? Now when it comes to SAO guns such as 1911's and Sig SAO guns then yes, a safety is important, but again they can and will fail (been there, done that)

If a safety is important to you for an HD gun due to small children in the house then may I suggest keeping the gun at Condition 3....loaded mag, empty chamber, hammer down. The one thing to keep in mind is that when your mind is going 100 miles a minute-will you remember to take the safety off? That is one of the nice things with a traditional DA/SA gun such as a Sig, no safety and it will go bang only when you make a conscious decision to pull the trigger.

I'll get off my soap box now and again I meant no offense with this post but its something you should seriously consider. You might also want to consider some professional training as to the proper use of HD technique. If I read your HD post wrong then I apologize but if I read it as I thought I did, then you really have some issues that need to be addressed. My final point to make, if I may, buy yourself a standard P226 or MK25 (as it has a true 1916 Pic rail) and mount a good quality weapon mounted light on it then learn to use it. Surefire X300 is my personal choice, but Streamlight and the APL are good choices too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,137 Posts
I agree with you guys. The DA to SA transition is almost a non-event for me, having shot both SA and DA revolvers though my younger years, I'm used to it. Still, it's good to practice with the DA/SA Sig. One thing I don't think I've done more than once or twice in all my P226/P229 shooting is cock the hammer manually for my first shot. That isn't a wired in part of my program for the gun.

Another thing you hear about on the interenet often, is to stick with one gun type for carry, either SAO or DA/SA, whatever. I gon't give that concern much credence either. A P938 and P229 share in my regular carry routine - 4 or 5 active brain cells (of my few remaining) are reserved for each.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
598 Posts
I agree with you guys. The DA to SA transition is almost a non-event for me, having shot both SA and DA revolvers though my younger years, I'm used to it. Still, it's good to practice with the DA/SA Sig. One thing I don't think I've done more than once or twice in all my P226/P229 shooting is cock the hammer manually for my first shot. That isn't a wired in part of my program for the gun.

Another thing you hear about on the interenet often, is to stick with one gun type for carry, either SAO or DA/SA, whatever. I gon't give that concern much credence either. A P938 and P229 share in my regular carry routine - 4 or 5 active brain cells (of my few remaining) are reserved for each.
I agree. I'm not stuck on one manual of arms. I'm an equal opportunity employer of guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
192 Posts
It sounds to me like you're not sold on the DA/SA concept so I recommend you stick with what you are comfortable with. Get the SAO. No need for a decocker on a SAO pistol. That's what the safety is for. No need for a safety on a DA/SA pistol either. That's what the decocker is for.

I think the alleged trauma of transitioning from DA to SA trigger pull is way overblown. I think folks read about it on the internet and in gun rags and become convinced it's some sort of godawful problem. Much ado about nothing IMO. YMMV.
Agree 100%... I am probably not as proficient as 90% of the members on this forum, but if I am practicing good gun control to start with I don’t find the transition from first shot(DA) to second shot (SA) an issue. My goal is to be able to consistently hit a 6 “ target an about 10 yards with a fairly rapid target acquisition. Think home defense. Maybe I would have a different opinion if I were looking for 2” groups at the same distance, but even then , it’s still about target acquisition after the first shot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
I come from it the other side. I shoot a lot of revolver, learned to shoot with a revolver and some might think I'm a fair shot. I like the DA/SA because I wanted the first shot to feel like what I am used to but a DAO sig would be awesome ... For me.

The sig DA is smoooooooth. My first shot is usually my best.

At the range I usually load 6-8 at a time and always start the string from the decock to practice the transition
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I come from it the other side. I shoot a lot of revolver, learned to shoot with a revolver and some might think I'm a fair shot. I like the DA/SA because I wanted the first shot to feel like what I am used to but a DAO sig would be awesome ... For me.

The sig DA is smoooooooth. My first shot is usually my best.

At the range I usually load 6-8 at a time and always start the string from the decock to practice the transition
Like you, I shot revolvers for years. My first Sig was a P226 DA/SA. As you noted, the DA is so smooth and long that it felt familiar. Broken in its under a 9 lb pull, not much heavier than a Glock but incredibly smoother. Shooting quick DA/SA pairs is a great exercise and gets you used to using the decocker, a very cool feature. It’s the perfect nightstand pistol with light and laser. I carry a P365MS, also with a long, fairly smooth pull. My wife OTOH is SAO only with her P938 and P229 SAO. I find I can shoot all 4 well without distraction by their differences. Rotating thru them at the range is an interesting exercise. We need to challenge ourselves.

There’s a LOT of great advice on this thread. Pick one and learn to use it properly and safely. Then maybe add something different. And maybe another . . . there’s no right or wrong, best or worst.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
By your statement in your opening post, you are not properly indoctrinated in running a SAO pistol. The 1911 (or any other SAO pistol with a thumb safety should be carried in Condition One (hammer cocked, thumb safety on). Upon presentation from the holster, the thumb safety is disengaged when the muzzle is pivoted toward the threat, shooting hand thumb on top of the thumb safety, finger OFF the Trigger alongside the frame/dust cover, allowing you to immediately engage from retention - or continue the thrust of the pistol toward the target/threat out to eye level with the support hand (which should have been moving toward the centerline of the body so as to achieve a two-hand hold on the pistola as it comes out). After engaging any and all targets/threats and/or upon moving to HARD Cover (if not already there), the finger comes off the trigger and the thumb safety should be applied, with the shooting hand thumb again placed upon the top of the safety's "thumb paddle", ready to depress it and re-engage, if necessary. Futzing around with lowering the hammer on a live round, under pressure, with hands slippery with sweat or blood is a recipe for disaster. If the police are close and the threat(s) no longer pose any threat, find a position of cover and/or advantage apply the safety and reholster; keeping your hands visible. DO NOT approach your attackers. Make sure no one else does so as to keep their weapons/evidence from "disappearing". I would encourage you to obtain Gunsite and Thunder Ranch's videos on running a pistol/1911, if not taking one of their classes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
If you want a DA/SA gun with a safety then buy a Beretta.

Forgive how I'm about to say this, but,If your a 1911 guy then for the love of God why are you lowering the hammer on a live chamber? Are you asking for an AD??? Leave it cocked and locked. If I understood your post you want to lower the hammer each time you go from one room to another?? That is called "put the thumb safety back on and keep your finger straight."

No offense meant with this but if you think you need a safety on a DA/SA then you should really shoot more and become accustom to things. The definition of a safety is "a mechanical device that can and WILL fail" People rely on the false sense of security when it comes to safeties on firearms. Number 1 rule is keep your finger off the bang switch until your ready to use it. When the gun is in the holster, how will it shoot itself??? Now when it comes to SAO guns such as 1911's and Sig SAO guns then yes, a safety is important, but again they can and will fail (been there, done that)

If a safety is important to you for an HD gun due to small children in the house then may I suggest keeping the gun at Condition 3....loaded mag, empty chamber, hammer down. The one thing to keep in mind is that when your mind is going 100 miles a minute-will you remember to take the safety off? That is one of the nice things with a traditional DA/SA gun such as a Sig, no safety and it will go bang only when you make a conscious decision to pull the trigger.

I'll get off my soap box now and again I meant no offense with this post but its something you should seriously consider. You might also want to consider some professional training as to the proper use of HD technique. If I read your HD post wrong then I apologize but if I read it as I thought I did, then you really have some issues that need to be addressed. My final point to make, if I may, buy yourself a standard P226 or MK25 (as it has a true 1916 Pic rail) and mount a good quality weapon mounted light on it then learn to use it. Surefire X300 is my personal choice, but Streamlight and the APL are good choices too.

This is great advice. I had to read the original post twice. The thought of lowering the hammer on a 1911 makes me shake
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top