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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!

Relatively new Sig owner here (standard p365) but I have a ton of exposure to them and range time with friend's guns and I've fallen in love with how the 320 shoots for me. So my next Sig will be a P320 compact. However, I can't decide between a standard version or the Massachusetts compliant one with the manual safety and Siglite night sights. Price wise, they look to be similar, as I would swap to night sights on the standard and 15 round mags on the Mass compliant model.

Between the two, what would you choose and why? Thanks!
 

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It’s just preference and what you are used to in my opinion. My wife uses one with a safety and I do not and carry aiwb and have zero problems but I also use my brain when I carry.


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If you have trained with a manual safety, then get it, if not, dont. Its all about what you like.
 
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First off, manual safety is a personal preference. The difference between the two is negligible. I personally prefer non MS but, I just built a M18 chambered in 357 Sig that has a MS and I’m totally fine with it. Choose Wisely.
 

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Manual safety is one more thing to go wrong during draw cycle. The fact that a nanny state mandates it is another reason not to use it. The holster is safety for standard P320 so get a custom Kydex holster. Holster is extremely vital. Most people purchase a good handgun and lower quality holster. Dale Fricke is my holster/mag pouch AIWB goto.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Manual safety is one more thing to go wrong during draw cycle. The fact thst a nanny state mandates it is another reason not to use it. The holster is safety for standard P320 so get a custom Kydex holster. Holster is extremely vital. Most people purchase a good handgun and lower quality holster. Dale Fricke is my holster/mag pouch AIWB goto.

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Completely agree. That added layer of safety is nice but not necessary. I exclusively run kydex holsters, the brand I've been favoring lately is Tulster. Great holsters! That being said, I lean towards the standard more so as it seems to have more grip module options should I choose to change it.
 

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Completely agree. That added layer of safety is nice but not necessary. I exclusively run kydex holsters, the brand I've been favoring lately is Tulster. Great holsters! That being said, I lean towards the standard more so as it seems to have more grip module options should I choose to change it.
I AIWB a S&W 44 Mag snub nose revolver in a custom Dale Ficke holstser too. No manual safety there, either.

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If your P365 has a safety then get a P320 with a safety. If your P365 does not have a safety the get a P320 without a safety. It will be less confusing if you carry both of them but at different times. TG
Consistency in controls is very important. I used to think otherwise, but now follow one paradigm, so 1911 and FsN are in the gun safe or for home defense. EDC Snub/p320C.
 

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Adding a manual safety is one of the 2 things I'd like to do to mine, the other is to swap out the compact grip & 15 rnd mags for a Wilson Combat Carry II & 17 rnd mags.
Being a long time 1911 guy, I just am not comfortable carrying without the safety.
 

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My wife had never been around firearms at all until we met (born overseas and grew up in NYC).
I began her first on revolvers and felt it was a better match for her to have a P320 with no safety.
She is very comfortable with the P320 and has enough rounds downrange with accuracy for me to relax a bit on her potential response-

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Converting a manual safety to non safety is easier and cheaper than the other way around. Just the safety lever pin and grip module.

However, don’t the Mass compliant handguns have like 10# trigger pulls?
 

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As @saudadeii said. Easier to remove the MS, then reinstall if you change your mind. To add one to a non MS model, the frame has to be modified.

Maybe the 10 lb trigger components can be replaced with standard parts. Not sure what this would involve.

Another option for MS would be to get a M18.
 

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Mine started out as a Mass-compliant P320 compact. I wanted the safety, and it was the only one I could find at the time. Other than the safety, the Mass version has a loaded chamber witness hole at rear/top of barrel. I think newer P320 barrels all come with the hole now, but not sure. Trigger is the same. Apparently, the safety and barrel hole fulfill the Mass requirements without changing trigger weight.

That being said, my P365 does not have the safety and I'm fine with it. After installing the Sig straight skeletonized (legion?) trigger on the P320, the pull was really light for me. I'm coming from mostly DA/SA guns, so was used to heavy first pull. I like the safety on the P320 with light trigger, but am comfortable with no safety on the P365 with slightly heavier and longer-pull trigger.
 

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Manual safety is one more thing to go wrong during draw cycle. The fact that a nanny state mandates it is another reason not to use it.
On a competitive firing line with the clock running, it could happen. With a concealed carry gun, the impetus to engage in a High Noon situation is much less - the carrier should know whether or not he should be there at that time of day, should be aware of his surroundings, and should be able to anticipate whether or not they want to slide the safety OFF if possible to accelerate their practiced high speed draw.

Which isn't usually allowed at a lot of indoor ranges. Nope, you do that alone at home with an unloaded gun.

That fact that a nanny state mandates it has no bearing - they copied military standard, which was adopted over 100 years ago, along with a 6 pound tactical trigger pull, to keep soldiers with a propensity to put their finger on the trigger while traversing rough terrain, or on horseback/crew served vehicles to keep from shooting themselves while exhausted, scared and dodging around on a battleground.

Get into a shootout in a mall, there's no effective difference. High stress is said to reduce our fine motor skills, but again, it's not a High Noon fast draw exercise in a lot of cases. I'll even suggest that if someone is constantly walking into ambushes, attacks, and beat downs there's a much bigger problem than a lack of a safety can fix.

Where the safety comes into effect is the other 99.44% of carry time - gun handling, holstering, public restroom use, family gatherings, church, socializing, restaurants, at the range - all those times and places posted online with pics where normal, intelligent carriers with a brain mishandle, drop, or otherwise have their firearm discharge striking themselves or others. A safety WILL reduce that. THERE is the point of the "nanny" state or military, who knows well enough that the first 3 years of service may not fully form the habits of gun handling. Rather than subject the taxpayers and country to the loss of service for a short time or permanently of an expensively trained yet NEW gun handler, the safety was installed. And striker fired guns with thumb safeties were on the market before the 1911 was invented. That was the engineer's decision, the manufacturers production, and the public's welfare in mind. It's not the quick draw that McGraw fails to get done in time - how many real confrontations are timed to the split second? - its the gun handling and carry which can, does, and WILL fail to occur.

Glock does offer a thumb safety when the contract requires it, and some nations and PD's have that requirement. They may be acting like a nanny state but I see it as wearing your seat belt common sense. Of course you aren't going to speed, lose control, slide over an ice slicked highway and collide with a roofing tanker to be trapped underneath it's hot oozing cargo while you struggle with your seat belt. Nope, you stay restrained in the car when you get T boned by a drunk. Thats much more common. So it is with a safety, it's not about when you might need to shoot the other guy .01 seconds before he shoots you - and there's no guarantee you will keep him from following thru, that is a fact - no, it's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from the gun going off because We Are All Humans, and Humans make mistakes. People are shot with their own guns a lot more than we are willling to admit.

The "nice" part is that the individual, even in a nanny state, can choose to use or not use a safety. I'm not fully read up on MA law but Im pretty sure there isn't a statute making carry with the safety off a felony. Do cops walk down the street stopping people to check, no. More likely stop you at a check point for alcohol, then they get you for no seatbelt.

If there is no safety, you cannot use it, if there is, you can choose. Better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it - ask the guys with entry wounds in their upper leg from their choices. Every one will insist they have a brain, there is no guarantee it will be functioning at the moment you need it. As every spouse will testify.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
On a competitive firing line with the clock running, it could happen. With a concealed carry gun, the impetus to engage in a High Noon situation is much less - the carrier should know whether or not he should be there at that time of day, should be aware of his surroundings, and should be able to anticipate whether or not they want to slide the safety OFF if possible to accelerate their practiced high speed draw.

Which isn't usually allowed at a lot of indoor ranges. Nope, you do that alone at home with an unloaded gun.

That fact that a nanny state mandates it has no bearing - they copied military standard, which was adopted over 100 years ago, along with a 6 pound tactical trigger pull, to keep soldiers with a propensity to put their finger on the trigger while traversing rough terrain, or on horseback/crew served vehicles to keep from shooting themselves while exhausted, scared and dodging around on a battleground.

Get into a shootout in a mall, there's no effective difference. High stress is said to reduce our fine motor skills, but again, it's not a High Noon fast draw exercise in a lot of cases. I'll even suggest that if someone is constantly walking into ambushes, attacks, and beat downs there's a much bigger problem than a lack of a safety can fix.

Where the safety comes into effect is the other 99.44% of carry time - gun handling, holstering, public restroom use, family gatherings, church, socializing, restaurants, at the range - all those times and places posted online with pics where normal, intelligent carriers with a brain mishandle, drop, or otherwise have their firearm discharge striking themselves or others. A safety WILL reduce that. THERE is the point of the "nanny" state or military, who knows well enough that the first 3 years of service may not fully form the habits of gun handling. Rather than subject the taxpayers and country to the loss of service for a short time or permanently of an expensively trained yet NEW gun handler, the safety was installed. And striker fired guns with thumb safeties were on the market before the 1911 was invented. That was the engineer's decision, the manufacturers production, and the public's welfare in mind. It's not the quick draw that McGraw fails to get done in time - how many real confrontations are timed to the split second? - its the gun handling and carry which can, does, and WILL fail to occur.

Glock does offer a thumb safety when the contract requires it, and some nations and PD's have that requirement. They may be acting like a nanny state but I see it as wearing your seat belt common sense. Of course you aren't going to speed, lose control, slide over an ice slicked highway and collide with a roofing tanker to be trapped underneath it's hot oozing cargo while you struggle with your seat belt. Nope, you stay restrained in the car when you get T boned by a drunk. Thats much more common. So it is with a safety, it's not about when you might need to shoot the other guy .01 seconds before he shoots you - and there's no guarantee you will keep him from following thru, that is a fact - no, it's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from the gun going off because We Are All Humans, and Humans make mistakes. People are shot with their own guns a lot more than we are willling to admit.

The "nice" part is that the individual, even in a nanny state, can choose to use or not use a safety. I'm not fully read up on MA law but Im pretty sure there isn't a statute making carry with the safety off a felony. Do cops walk down the street stopping people to check, no. More likely stop you at a check point for alcohol, then they get you for no seatbelt.

If there is no safety, you cannot use it, if there is, you can choose. Better to have one and not need it than need one and not have it - ask the guys with entry wounds in their upper leg from their choices. Every one will insist they have a brain, there is no guarantee it will be functioning at the moment you need it. As every spouse will testify.
I appreciate the thought that went into this post. And from what others said about being able to convert the manual safety to a non manual safety brought quite a bit of insight.

I think I lean much more towards your argument that as a CCW holder, I'm not concerned about the fastest draw in the unlikely event that I need to use a firearm. But the every day handling where it's far likelier for negligence to occur. Will a safety completely negate that? Nope, but as you said its far less likely.

I think any of our spouses would agree that we often DON'T have our heads on straight 🤣
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Mine started out as a Mass-compliant P320 compact. I wanted the safety, and it was the only one I could find at the time. Other than the safety, the Mass version has a loaded chamber witness hole at rear/top of barrel. I think newer P320 barrels all come with the hole now, but not sure. Trigger is the same. Apparently, the safety and barrel hole fulfill the Mass requirements without changing trigger weight.

That being said, my P365 does not have the safety and I'm fine with it. After installing the Sig straight skeletonized (legion?) trigger on the P320, the pull was really light for me. I'm coming from mostly DA/SA guns, so was used to heavy first pull. I like the safety on the P320 with light trigger, but am comfortable with no safety on the P365 with slightly heavier and longer-pull trigger.
I have a 365 w/o a manual safety as well. I think the Mass version is what I might go with as the manual safety can be removed and a grip module without can be installed should I change my mind.
 
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