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I use Hoppes #9 solvent for cleaning. Being I live in a sub-tropical environment where thickening of lubricant in not an issue, I use Lubriplate to lubricate the pistol. You can clean the striker channel with solvent but ensure it is completely dry. Nothing should be used to lubricate the striker channel, not even dry lube. There is no metal on metal contact in the striker channel, there is only polymer on metal contact. Using dry lube has absolutely no benefit.
I respectfully disagree. A dry lube will help slick up polymer on metal. The advantage of a dry lube is that it does not attract and hold dirt or firing residues as oil or grease will.
 

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I respectfully disagree. A dry lube will help slick up polymer on metal. The advantage of a dry lube is that it does not attract and hold dirt or firing residues as oil or grease will.
What dry lube do you recommend?
 

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What dry lube do you recommend?
I have been using the Hornandy one shot cleaner/lube, just a quick shot up into the striker slot from the breech end, Occasionally flood it and hold muzzle up so any accumulated debris/dirt will wash back out . I took the striker out after shooting a few times, to check and it looks clean like nothing there, no accumulation of dirt or lube. This is the lube that is recommended in the Ruger 10/22 rifles which are notorious for getting dirty and eventually jamming if a wet lube is used, Blowback gasses and oil create sludge that slows things down. I can shoot one of them and then take a little "acid brush" like you use for soldering flux, and literally brush the inside of the action clean. The shooting residues just brush off, then reapply the one shot lube and it's good to go for the next time. There are several good dry lubes out there , Super lube, Liquid Wrench, most contain some teflon
 

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I have been using the Hornandy one shot cleaner/lube, just a quick shot up into the striker slot from the breech end, Occasionally flood it and hold muzzle up so any accumulated debris/dirt will wash back out . I took the striker out after shooting a few times, to check and it looks clean like nothing there, no accumulation of dirt or lube. This is the lube that is recommended in the Ruger 10/22 rifles which are notorious for getting dirty and eventually jamming if a wet lube is used, Blowback gasses and oil create sludge that slows things down. I can shoot one of them and then take a little "acid brush" like you use for soldering flux, and literally brush the inside of the action clean. The shooting residues just brush off, then reapply the one shot lube and it's good to go for the next time. There are several good dry lubes out there , Super lube, Liquid Wrench, most contain some teflon
I think I'll stick with the Manufacturer's recommendation (Sig in this instance) and not introduce any lube into the striker channel...though I do clean it with Hoppes 9 and that in itself leaves a residual lubricant from its chemical makeup that I feel is adequate for that area. I'm certainly going to consider this product for other areas of lubrication.
 

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I simply use compressed air to blow out striker channel, it’s not metal on metal so it should function fine as is. Simply remove the rear plate, so the bullet bits don’t pile up. I do this every 500 rounds or so. As far as over cleaning, a little bit of residue in the barrel is not a bad thing, actually functions as a lubricant/ coolant just like lead used to do on engine valves. If I use some crappy dirty ammo I’ll clean it right away, otherwise every 500 rounds or so unless I’m really bored...
 

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Personally I would prefer to have a thin film of a dedicated dry lubricant of known properties. I have a hard time believing that firing residue ie dirt can act as an lubricant, much less as a coolant. After cleaning mine after 100 rounds, I actually found the striker channel clean, no residue. I suspect the case base being held against the face of the slide by both the extractor and gas pressure prevents anything from getting in via the only source, the firing pin hole. My procedure is to blow it out with compressed air then a shot of dry lube.
 

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In the gun store where I work, some of the noobs coming in these days, ask me if their guns need to be cleaned after every trip to the range.
I explain to them that these modern guns are very tolerant of neglect but my good ARMY training demands that my gear gets cleaned before I go to bed.
Cleaning guns should be like cuddling after sex. You get to check everything out, get intimate, familiar, and make sure everyone is still friends and nothing got broken.
There is no reason not to clean your gear. If it's your daily carry you don't want all that range smut on you and your clothes.
If it is a tournament tool then there are very elaborate procedures that I'll save for another post.
CLEAN YOUR JUNK!
 

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Texasgiant and Montana, I agree. The gun may not get a total breakdown, but major areas , barrel, slide rails, frame rails and other areas that are know to accumulate firing residue get attention. My AR 15 types are probably the worst, that's the major reason I built some with gas piston vs direct impingment operating systems, A lot cleaner and easier to clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #30
In the gun store where I work, some of the noobs coming in these days, ask me if their guns need to be cleaned after every trip to the range.
I explain to them that these modern guns are very tolerant of neglect but my good ARMY training demands that my gear gets cleaned before I go to bed.
Cleaning guns should be like cuddling after sex. You get to check everything out, get intimate, familiar, and make sure everyone is still friends and nothing got broken.
There is no reason not to clean your gear. If it's your daily carry you don't want all that range smut on you and your clothes.
If it is a tournament tool then there are very elaborate procedures that I'll save for another post.
CLEAN YOUR JUNK!
I have to agree on the the post range gunk. Even if it's only one box of ammo I can't relax until I've at least given it a minimal cleaning. But if it continues to look like it did after my last trip to the range I'll leave the spring assembly and the rear of the slide alone until I can put a lot more ammo through it.
 
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