SIG Talk banner

Clean off factory oil before use? And break in period?

24887 39
So this is my first pistol and I noticed it's pretty well coated in some kind of oil. Is this for shipping or can I leave it on until after my first range trip?

Also I have Hoppe's Elite gun oil. I got from a friend. Is this good gun oil or is it pretty much personal preference?

And finally any tips for "breakin" in the p320? Is it just fire a few hundred rounds or what is this "breakin" period I keep reading about?

Thanks a bunch y'all can't wait for the doc to clear me to shoot!
1 - 20 of 40 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,265 Posts
The oil from the factory is primarily a preservative and not a good lubricant. Oil pivot points with the Lucas oil provided and put some grease on the rails and inside the slide where the barrel rubs and locks up.

Your pistol will operate more smoothly, eject better and wear less during break-in when cleaned and lubed before its first use.

Bill
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,262 Posts
Yes, to follow up on Mr McGoo, you should field strip your gun, clean it thoroughly and inspect it to ensure all the parts are there and not damaged. Believe it or not, even some of the top tier producers occasionally send out broken stuff. It's just real life. Lube it according to the manufacturer's specs and go shoot it. Most striker fire guns do not require a lot of lube, though, and there really is no "break in period" with these modern guns, although it's safe to say that all guns need at least 200 rounds put through them before they're considered "ready to go". Some of the older and/or higher end custom guns sometimes need that break in period b/c they are tight, but that's not really an issue for the P320. That's just a general rule of thumb, but the P320 should be RTG out of the box, provided you've inspected, cleaned and lubed it properly. Congrats, btw. The P320 is a dandy of a gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,481 Posts
I clean everything well including the striker area that some newbe's for get about . Spray everything off with non-chlorinated brake cleaner and wipe dry let air dry a while . Reassemble and use lite thin clp on fcu pivot points and general wipe down . Synthetic grease on the lug and bolt and out side of barrel nose and front edge of chamber and anything else that may rub metal to metal with high quality synthetic 0w20 on rails with a small amount of grease to mix in .

Brake in is as much for the owner and there new handgun as the handgun it self to me . Does not matter the make , I'll always shoot 400 trouble free rounds starting with a mid weight hot load . 9mm would 50 rounds of a 124gr +P , 40sw would be a 155gr 1200fps + load . After a box the recoil springs soften up some and lite load should cycle fin in 9mm . Just stay with a better quality of ammo till you get a few hundred rounds fired then if you go cheap on ammo and have a problem look at ammo first !!

Brand of oils ?? There so many really good products out there . If its "GUN" it will cost far more than going to a auto part store and buying some quality synthetic products as far as grease and oil goes .

G96 clp maybe the best CLP out there currently and is mil spec but a lite thin clp like pro-shot's one step gets into the small parts and pivot points far better than heavier oils and greases do and works well for general cleaning and wipe down too .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
262 Posts
This is me, personally.

I clean the oil out of the chamber and barrel, and outside the barrel. I wipe off any excess oil that looks to be excessive, then shoot. I don't break in. I figure it is a sad day when a pistol needs to be "broken in"; they should leave the factory functional and preserved.

I've shot a handgun since 1970, on and off a lot of different makes. My guns run dry, no oil on the rails or a lot of the parts. Oil collects dust and debris. I do not oil the rails, nor the striker channel (warns against that anyway in the manual).

About the most I have done, with the P320 pistols I have is take a 600 grit emery cloth and polished the rail of the slide center that the rounds happen to touch, topped off with a red polishing emery cloth. I inspect for any burrs and eliminate them if found.

I have been known to polish the parts that meet in various firearm, especially the AR series of rifles. 2 metal parts that have been polished have little wear on each other. 2 metal parts with factory bluing and milling will wear on each other until they meet a sort of equilibrium of smoothness. I eliminate that period and make them smooth from the onset.

I use just a little 5W-30 synthetic oil in the barrel pivot area. I mean little. If it can just be picked up with a straight pin and placed there, that's enough for me. Leave the grease and FCU alone. It works fine.

If I really want to lubricate something I use either dry graphite or some bullet lubricant (dry) I bought at amazon. Hexagonal Boron Nitride HBN . Grease that contains Molybdenum disulfide is a superior grease if ever used. You can also get in a dry powder, but beware, it's messy, and if you get some on your table you'll know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,507 Posts
Follow the owner's manual and you won't go wrong; use grease and oil where recommended but very sparingly. Most people have a heavy hand and there's no need.

Pay particular attention to the bore, especially when new, swab it out well until clean. Then lightly oil. You want to eliminate any metal flakes that may have been left behind during the manufacture and test firing. Inspect your new firearm closely to 1) learn it and its mechanical functionality; and 2) identify any defects - look closely inside the bore's rifling for smooth, clean lands and grooves.

Enjoy and always handle safely and with care.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
369 Posts
Where's the fun in that?

This may sound weird, but IMO part of the fun of getting a new one is spending time getting to know it. Read the manual, disassemble, clean, inspect, lube, function check, familiarize with the manual of arms.
I'll bet you have better-than-average luck with how your guns perform and how long they last. ;)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
6,262 Posts
Does the FCU need to be cleaned off and relubed as well? Mine came with white grease on it
The FCU should be inspected, but follow the manufacturers recommendations and you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,978 Posts
There are 3 times when you thoroughly inspect, clean and lubericate a weapon.

1. When you receive it. Pull of the grips and clean the whole thing with Brake Cleaner. Get everything off of it. Then Grease the Rails, oil the spinning parts, and re-assemble
2. Monthly if you don't shoot it. Run a dry swab from the breech to the muzzle to clean out the barrel and then use a CLP (I use Break Free) to lube the lands. Then run a dry swab to make sure that there is no over build in the weapon barrel. Inspect for any buildup on the exterior, the slide, The rails and any interior spaces.
3. After shooting. Clean throughly as in Step 1.

Revolvers, follow the same but take off the side plate annually and detail clean the parts. VERY LIGHTLY CLP the areas that rub, paying particular attention to areas of wear (Hammer in the frame, Rebound block, etc.)

No Grease in revolvers except where you have Cylendar to Yoke mating. There you can put a VERY little grease to keep the water out and keep the calendar free to move.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
758 Posts
+1 clean and lube any gun before first use.

As far as Break in, surfaces are rubbing on each other so there will be some seating, but I'm not aware of any official break in (I'm sure someone will let us know if I've missed it). That said most don't get too concerned over a small fail here or there for the first few hundred round or so, unless it gets more frequent. IE, an FTF or FTE 1 or 2 times in the first hundred rounds or so. I think of the "break in" more as a confidence (in the gun) building exercise. Once I have sent 500 - 1000 rounds through it without issue, I feel confident in the gun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
861 Posts
Clean off factory oil before use? And break in period?
Does a gun need a "break-in" period to make it work properly? Certainly - one round. Any new gun should shoot properly directly out of the box from the factory or it will be sent back to the factory to be corrected. I do shoot a couple of hundred rounds through any new gun, not to make the gun work properly, but as a confidence builder before using it for carry or home defense.

Should you clean factory oil off of a new gun before use? There is certainly nothing wrong with factory oil or grease that would require it to be removed. I thoroughly clean a new gun to inspect for proper parts fit and finish (burrs or other rough spots) and to flush out the inevitable debris (shavings and chips) left in the gun from the manufacturing process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
303 Posts
I wipe it off, inspect it and shoot it. It was fired from the factory. When done, I break it down, clean, inspect it, put back together and dry fire the pi$$ out of it.
If you make sure it has no barrel obstruction, nothing is broke and functions properly, there is no need to thourghly clean and lube it until after your range session. That's my routine.
It's your gun, do as you wish. Semper Fi
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,462 Posts
I take my brand new Sigs apart and give a very quick inspection. With the weapon field stripped, I lube the s#!+ out of it (usually with something inexpensive like Rem-oil but whatever I have) to a ridiculous degree (drippy wet) and fire it around 50-100 times. Then I take it home and totally disassemble and clean every pore, lubing all the right parts, greasing the grease parts, paying attention to any wear points, and wiping down the finishes with oil, locktite on the grip screws--etc. Not sure why I do it this way but I have pretty much always done that and I rarely have any issues. I guess I started it many years ago when I would buy a seemingly pretty dry pistol but was too excited to wait to shoot it. Now I continue doing it that way, since it has seemed to work out. Others above have commented about liking to keep their pistols dry. I am the opposite, I keep and carry mine as wet as I can get away with without getting oil stains on my pants.
 
1 - 20 of 40 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top