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Now for the blem/spots on the back of the slide since no one has touched on it, while your pictures aren't great that could simply be dried oil or something on it. Grab some oil or alcohol and see if it will wipe off.
 

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I have never looked at 365s.
I have a lot of experience with the P series.
Sig has a tolerance on loose, because every one can't be perfect. Talk to Sig, and they will exchange, even if within tolerance, if you stand your ground politely.


I use TW25B for tight slide-frame fit.
For loose slides, I have Jim Enos Slide Glide heavy. I had a very loose 229, and with the heavy, no looseness was evident.

Before buying one should inspect very carefully. If buying online to a local FFL, it can be inspected before accepting.
Some online dealers will say no inspect, and turn down. I just don't buy from them. It is all in the fine print.

 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I have never looked at 365s.
I have a lot of experience with the P series.
Sig has a tolerance on loose, because every one can't be perfect. Talk to Sig, and they will exchange, even if within tolerance, if you stand your ground politely.


I use TW25B for tight slide-frame fit.
For loose slides, I have Jim Enos Slide Glide heavy. I had a very loose 229, and with the heavy, no looseness was evident.

Before buying one should inspect very carefully. If buying online to a local FFL, it can be inspected before accepting.
Some online dealers will say no inspect, and turn down. I just don't buy from them. It is all in the fine print.


I went with the SAS

thank you to everyone who responded. Im going to go shoot a 100 rounds on my off day. if all seems well comparing it to another sas im just going to leave well enough alone. the sights on it are a beautifully lite green in the dark.

I do have other people in the home. No children. but do you suggest hollow points for that reason? Correct me if im wrong but was once told they add a layer of safety in case of accidental discharge as far as going through walls and possibly injuring someone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
There are a lot of good videos on youtube. Also some really bad videos. So watch how far they try to get you to take the pistol apart. This guy at Mr Guns Gear Channel makes some decent easily comprehended videos. And to just clean the firearm, this one show how far to take the P365 apart. If you have someone who can show you, even better.

Also, congratulations on the young son. Just some advice if you haven't already. Buy a lock box for the pistol. The little guy won't be little all that long, and they can get into a pistol due to curiosity. None of us want to see that happen.

People here can also help guide you through the cleaning and assembly.


thanks mate.

if I run across any snags ill look for some help.
 

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should have just added another $200 and got the PPK.
Before you do anything, take it to the range and shoot it. If you encounter a problem, contact Sig CS then.

Having owned and enjoyed a PPK/S (carried in my boot as a back-up when I was a LEO) and now several P365's, you're far better off with the Sig. Although the quality & workmanship is excellent, it remains a nearly 90 year-old design - the sights on the Walther are small and difficult to acquire, it has sharp edges on the frame, a 12+ # trigger pull and is .380 with only a 6-round magazine capacity.
 

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For peace of mind I would contact Sig Customer Service and get their read. Be sure to send them you pictures. They have always been very helpful to me when I have had any issues.
 

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I do have other people in the home. No children. but do you suggest hollow points for that reason? Correct me if im wrong but was once told they add a layer of safety in case of accidental discharge as far as going through walls and possibly injuring someone.
A hollow point bullet fired with sufficient velocity will expand when it hits the target, transfer most of its energy into the target, and even if the bullet exits the target, the remaining energy will be reduced so significantly that it's much less likely to injure an innocent bystander. Unless your state law prohibits hollow point ammunition (with a 2nd amendment violating law), use hollow point ammunition for self defense.

Also note that the 3.1" long barrel of the P365 will NOT allow a bullet to achieve as high a velocity as longer barrelled guns. As a result, some ammunition may not reach expansion velocity, especially when the bullet must travel through several layers of clothing. Using a 115 grain or lighter bullet with a +P powder load will help insure that the bullet reaches sufficient velocity to reliably expend in almost all conditions.
 

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There is a learning curve becoming familiar with firearms, much the same as automobiles. Like, how come lug nuts are so tight? Even when the shop uses a calibrated torque wrench and tightens to specifications, it can take a lot more to loosen them. Sometimes it's too much with the supplied lug wrench, but using a piece of pipe or longer handled wrench and no problem. Having tightened hundreds over my early career in automotives I gained a feel for what is right, but I also use a torque wrench.

That gap in the P365 - I've forgotten how many pistols I have owned in the last 48 years - isn't necessarily a defect - and in some cases is definitely a feature. Those new to guns will discover a long running discussion about how much space there should be between major moving parts of a self loading firearm.

Having been taught to shoot in the military I had to qualify on the 1911A1, my issue weapon rattled like a cup of dice a the gaming table - and I shot Expert with it. Same for the issued M16(no suffix, a very early one.) I could stick playing cards thru the upper and lower. And, shot Expert with it. The slide on a self loading pistol has the sights attached to it, if it tips or wiggles, the sights move with it, self correcting. If it was so tight it didn't - there would be a lot of trouble with any dust, lint, dirt, even pollen. It may be expected to have no play or rattles, but in reality, there has to be some or parts simply won't slide and reload the pistol when it's fired.

All guns have what is called "clearance" to make sure they operate - or, they won't. Military grade weapons are even looser - one test that is performed is to take a handful of mud and dump it into the open gun bolt back, then release the bolt, which should chamber a round, and then fire it. Yes, they even bury them in mud, pull them out, and pull the trigger. It better go Bang and it better reload. That is what you are really paying $600 for - a gun that won't jam up with dirt, lint, or dust in it.

There is also how it works loaded - in this case, the gun as described had some play, was that with the magazine loaded in it? That magazine has a spring to push the ammo up to be ready for the slide to strip off a cartridge and chamber it. It's not light, and with a loaded magazine installed, my P365 has about half the play, or less, than when it's empty no mag. When you get to the range, check that yourself. There should be a significant difference. Manipulating unloaded weapons to see how they function isn't a test of how they operate when loaded or fired. There are a lot of posts online with owners attempting to do that at home and it often results in false conclusions. Take it to the range and shoot it, you get the correct and proper results many times.

My P365 is brand new, unfired, built in April 2021, the later models have the benefit of some early issues being corrected. Of the hundreds of posts I've read over the last month on the P365, this is the first discussion of it potentially being loose - but it's not the first I've read over decades. And it's usually from someone new to the use of firearms.

One of the benefits of military training is that when all the newly inducted soldiers are handed out their M16 for the first time, they can see 200-300 examples of exactly what they have, and, from then on, they are all in the learning curve together. A new owner not in the military is kinda all alone - so kudos to posting and asking. It's the ones who don't who are often told a lot of misinformation by others who never asked and the result is something we used to call "old wive's tales" getting passed around. And there are a lot of them.

I've already installed a left side safety before I've even shot it, and as a caution - follow SIG's instruction and do NOT remove the Fire Control Unit from the grip to clean it. That is not a user task and is unneeded. Even in the military, disassembling triggers is not user maintenance. And having taken mine out, I have now discovered how easy it is to improperly reinstall the slide stop or the slide lever connected to the sear, either of which will prevent correct reassembly. It will not go together if those parts slip out of place (they can,) and a bigger hammer won't do it, either. Just a suggestion from someone who surfed three hours on the net to find the one clue hidden hint in a multipart video. It's not rocket surgery, but, It's something to avoid until you want to do it.

I've said it to others over the years, if it rattles, that's a good thing. It's when it's bound up tight that problems start, and just one of the things that Northern Warfare training covers. You don't take your weapons into a heated building, you rack them outside in the subfreezing temps, or you will discover they are frozen tight when the condensation chills taking them back to 26F outdoors.

Goes to: ignore those who call for "tight tolerances" in firearms. If that was any good, then engines wouldn't have .bearing clearances or piston to cylinder clearances. Tolerances are how closely parts can be made to the blueprint size, clearances are what you must have to get things to operate dynamically. Again, all guns have clearances, and the dirtier, the bigger they are.

TL;DR: A new firearm must have some play or it won't play. ; )
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
lets put it this way when its held up to the light i can see the spring inside from within the gap you see in posted pictures
 

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There are no interlocking slide rails at that location, seeing the spring isn't a defect. Most auto pistols don't have a full set of slide rails, they would add friction, and are an unnecessary expense.
 

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On a different tack - I see a lot of posts on various gun forums complaining about fit and finish issues on the new guns they've just bought.

If there are visible blemishes or what may be a mechanical issue - why did you buy it in the first place? Just asking. I know there are reasons such as "the only one available" etc but if it didn't pass muster at home it shouldn't have passed muster at the gun shop!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 · (Edited)
im not someone who tries to make themselves out to know more than they do or smarter than i am. if i dont know something ill tell you. conning ones self is not a way to become knowledgeable about anything. inexperience with firearms and not noticing the blemishes is the only honest answer i can give ya..

the blemish not worried about so much but if the play is too much. i one. dont want to have spent $600 on a poorly made sidearm. 2, i dont want it to fail me if and when i need it most.


ive called around locally and from answers on here it seems as if its not a big concern
 

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Also note that their is play between the slide and the FCU and play between the FCU and the grip module.

The FCU of my P365X has about 0.010" play forward and backward in the grip module. Someone else on Sig Talk measured similar play between their FCU and the grip module. This play could be removed with some effort, but I don't believe it is significant enough to worry about. I'm just going to take periodic measurements to make sure it doesn't become any larger.

You can't do anything about the play between the FCU and the slide. That play is determined by the machining tolerances at the factory. That play will eventually increase as the slide and the FCU wears. The best that you can do is keep the rails in the slide and FCU clean and lubricated, which will reduce the wear.

Cleaning and lubricating is one of the more highly contested subjects in the gun world. Most people use CLP to clean and lubricate. CLP = Clean/Lubricate/Protect. It contains cleaners and lubricants. It's a convenient one step process. Most people consider it good enough. However, I do not.

The cleaner in CLP degrades the lubrication properties. I prefer to use a separate cleaner which I thoroughly remove, and then add a synthetic lubricant that also protects against corrosion. It's more time consuming and the synthetic lubricants that I use are more expensive than a CLP.

The reality is that it's unlikely that I would ever wear out the slide rail contacts on a P365 with the amount of shooting that I'm likely to do, using a CLP to maintain it. But I also live in Minnesota where the coldest recorded temperature was -60°F, and in Minneapolis it's not unusual to see temperatures of -30°F or lower. Petroleum lubricants thicken up at subzero temperatures to the point that they may cease to lubricate, and may slow the operation of the slide and possibly cause a failure to feed, etc.

For reliability where I live, I don't see that I have any option but to use synthetic lubricants in my P365X. I use MilComm TW25B synthetic grease with PTFE (Teflon) powder in it. TW25B®|Top Selling Extreme Performance Lubricant|Synthetic Grease
I also use their general purpose enzyme cleaner and also their bore cleaner.

I have also used the TW25B grease for other items, such as a bicycle spoke tension gauge. It reduced the hysteresis and is giving me more repeatable measurements.

I don't use petroleum lubricants for anything if I can avoid it. Synthetic lubricants simply work better in all conditions, and especially in cold temperatures.
 

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@Allen Bundy ...where is it that is so cold that petroleum lubricants will not work??
Minneapolis Minnesota.

Bearing failures occur in transmissions in subzero weather. The difference between an auto with synthetic lubricants and petroleum is night and day. With petroleum lubricants your auto struggles to even move when you start up in subzero weather. With synthetics you have full power almost immediately.

With petroleum lube it is very difficult to push an auto in subzero weather. With synthetic lube you can push the car, jump in and use the clutch to pop start the engine.

With petroleum in a manual transmission it can take two hands to shift gears. With synthetic lubricants you can slam the gears with one hand immediately. You don't need to wait for the transmission to warm up.

90 weight gear lube is so thick in subzero weather that if any is spilled on a bench you will SHRED a paper towel trying to wipe it up. You need to use a solvent like kerosene to soften it up enough to wipe off of the bench. 75W90 synthetic gear oil wipes up in subzero weather like it was summer.

Bicycle shifters are often lubricated with petroleum grease from the factory. But even synthetic grease is too thick in Minnesota winter. I use 75W90 synthetic gear oil in my shifters. Even then it still slows down the shifts in winter, but at least it shifts.

I use synthetic grease on my wheel bearings and pedal bearings. I made the mistake of riding with pedals lubed with petroleum grease in the winter and had a compete bearing failure where a caged ball bearing had the bearing balls and cage completely disintegrate. I now disassemble new sealed bearings, clean them, lube them with synthetic grease and reseal them, and I haven't had a problem since.

Also, rubber seals can be damaged with subzero weather when petroleum lube is used.

There is a reason that Minnesota is referred to as the land of the proud and frozen.
 

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Minneapolis Minnesota.

Bearing failures occur in transmissions in subzero weather. The difference between an auto with synthetic lubricants and petroleum is night and day. With petroleum lubricants your auto struggles to even move when you start up in subzero weather. With synthetics you have full power almost immediately.

With petroleum lube it is very difficult to push an auto in subzero weather. With synthetic lube you can push the car, jump in and use the clutch to pop start the engine.

With petroleum in a manual transmission it can take two hands to shift gears. With synthetic lubricants you can slam the gears with one hand immediately. You don't need to wait for the transmission to warm up.

90 weight gear lube is so thick in subzero weather that if any is spilled on a bench you will SHRED a paper towel trying to wipe it up. You need to use a solvent like kerosene to soften it up enough to wipe off of the bench. 75W90 synthetic gear oil wipes up in subzero weather like it was summer.

Bicycle shifters are often lubricated with petroleum grease from the factory. But even synthetic grease is too thick in Minnesota winter. I use 75W90 synthetic gear oil in my shifters. Even then it still slows down the shifts in winter, but at least it shifts.

I use synthetic grease on my wheel bearings and pedal bearings. I made the mistake of riding with pedals lubed with petroleum grease in the winter and had a compete bearing failure where a caged ball bearing had the bearing balls and cage completely disintegrate. I now disassemble new sealed bearings, clean them, lube them with synthetic grease and reseal them, and I haven't had a problem since.

Also, rubber seals can be damaged with subzero weather when petroleum lube is used.

There is a reason that Minnesota is referred to as the land of the proud and frozen.
Your bigger problem is riding a bicycle in -30F weather.
Ive fired handguns in sub-zero weather that ran just fine with a drop of quality CLP.
 

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Alaska, too. You don't heavily lube a gun for use in subzero temps, the viscosity goes to infinite and in some cases you can't even retract the slide or bolt. Along with that, if exposed to extreme temps, you don't take it inside with you - it will condense humidity inside the shelter in a heartbeat, attempt to freeze, then thaw, then freeze up all over again once you get outside.

For that matter, leaving any gun inside a vehicle will do that. The old .30-30 in the window gun rack had serious problems with condensation spring and fall, it's not pretty to see one speckled like a case of measles. Same with wet basements - it accelerates rust.

As for "tightening up the slide rails," it was one of the first things attempted on 1911's to get rid of the clearance and make it appear as if it was a finely crafted handmade gun. Gunsmiths literally peened the rails with hammers to take out the slack, stoned them down to a far thee well, and everyone bragged on how tight they were. Until they went to shoot them, when malfunctions rained supreme. Add hollow points and a 2.5 pound target trigger, target sights, extended controls, tactical this that and the other, it became a highly tuned machine that largely could only work on a sunny Saturday at the range shooting special ammo.

In the meantime 1911's dirty in holsters kept chugging on in the rain dust and snow, because they could. Race spec guns with minimal clearances and tight fits are problematic - like a hot rod street car, you add all sorts of performance items and it becomes difficult to start in cold weather, won't run well idling to the grocery store, beats your eardrums, eats your tires, etc. You trade off good manners and shove the performance into a small range of rpm where nobody can use it to get a gallon of milk or loaf of bread.

For a daily carry weapon, target sights, muzzle brakes, plus 5 magazines, race controls, etc etc are counter productive to having a light weight, reliable and weather resistant gun.
 

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Your bigger problem is riding a bicycle in -30F weather.
The one saving grace is that there isn't much crime at -30°F.

Ive fired handguns in sub-zero weather that ran just fine with a drop of quality CLP.
It's your choice to use a CLP if you want to. But besides better cold weather performance, MilComm's TW25B grease or their TW2500 synthetic oil had better corrosion resistance than other lubes in every test that I've seen so far. FYI, the TW25B grease is rated to work down to -90°F and the MC2500 oil is rated down to -70°F.

When I lube a bicycle chain I don't just add more lube. That leaves all of the abrasive contaminants inside the chain pivots and the freshly added oil just helps the abrasives grind more efficiently. So I clean and degrease the chain, dry it, and then add a mixture of synthetic grease and mineral spirits. It penetrates into the pivots and the mineral spirits evaporate leaving the synthetic grease inside. I intend ti improve upon this by using a vacuum chamber to help suck the grease inside the chain pivots.

I also don't use the old method of repacking bearings with new grease without cleaning out the old grease first. I clean my bearings, dry them, and then add fresh synthetic grease.

There is no question that a separate cleaner and lube will outperform a CLP every time. The only question is: "Do you think that it's worth the extra effort, time, and money to use a separate cleaner and synthetic lubricant?"

For something critical I'll go the extra mile. I even use synthetic lubricant for door hinges. To me it's just a no brainer to clean first and then use synthetic lube. Why take a chance with 2nd best?
 

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Minneapolis Minnesota.

Bearing failures occur in transmissions in subzero weather. The difference between an auto with synthetic lubricants and petroleum is night and day. With petroleum lubricants your auto struggles to even move when you start up in subzero weather. With synthetics you have full power almost immediately.

With petroleum lube it is very difficult to push an auto in subzero weather. With synthetic lube you can push the car, jump in and use the clutch to pop start the engine.

With petroleum in a manual transmission it can take two hands to shift gears. With synthetic lubricants you can slam the gears with one hand immediately. You don't need to wait for the transmission to warm up.

90 weight gear lube is so thick in subzero weather that if any is spilled on a bench you will SHRED a paper towel trying to wipe it up. You need to use a solvent like kerosene to soften it up enough to wipe off of the bench. 75W90 synthetic gear oil wipes up in subzero weather like it was summer.

Bicycle shifters are often lubricated with petroleum grease from the factory. But even synthetic grease is too thick in Minnesota winter. I use 75W90 synthetic gear oil in my shifters. Even then it still slows down the shifts in winter, but at least it shifts.

I use synthetic grease on my wheel bearings and pedal bearings. I made the mistake of riding with pedals lubed with petroleum grease in the winter and had a compete bearing failure where a caged ball bearing had the bearing balls and cage completely disintegrate. I now disassemble new sealed bearings, clean them, lube them with synthetic grease and reseal them, and I haven't had a problem since.

Also, rubber seals can be damaged with subzero weather when petroleum lube is used.

There is a reason that Minnesota is referred to as the land of the proud and frozen.
I live in Northern Michigan. .it gets pretty dam cold here too. Unless you're open carrying on a -30 degree day I cannot see any need for synthetic lubricants. But to each their own. If it's -30 out you can bet my butt is going to be inside and if by some strange reason I needed to go out, I would definitely be carrying IWB. I use absolute minimal lubrication for my defensive weapon anyway...unless I'm going to the range for extended firing. I think as a whole folks tend to over-lubricate their firearms.
 

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no its not so loose it rattles you can just lift it up and down a bit as seen in the pics. someone posted a youtube video about the same problem. for $600 bucks i expected better quality. should have just added another $200 and got the PPK. although i do love how this particular gun feels in my hand and it shoots quite nicely.

i just got it less than a week ago. i just dont want to take it to the range for 3 months and then after so many rounds discover i have a much bigger problem on my hands
The P365 is superior to the PPK, in all regards. As for the blemishes, did you wipe down the slide with a rag and some oil? Now for the slide movement up and down. Most defensive type pistols have play between the slide and frame rails. The pistols will get dirty from shooting and if they are tight, this will affect reliability. If you have a target pistol, it should be tight. The P365 and other defensive pistols are not intended for target shooting, reliability is of foremost importance, second to tightness of fit. Remember, no one is pulling up on the slide when the pistol is fired.
 
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