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The solar is a pain. As ambient light changes, the solar causes the dot brightness to change in a way many don’t care for. Everyone I know who runs them full time, shuts the solar feature. Myself included.
How do you "shut the solar" off?
 

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Anyone have experience where a non-closed emitter pistol optic (such as 407k X2) gets gummed up by weather or dirt and doesn't show the dot? Trying to decide if it's worth a change-out on carry pistol(s). Thanks!
I have been using the 507K X2 mounted on my P365 as my EDC for almost a year. I also have their 507C X2 on my P320, but I only carry it occasionally. I love the 32/2 MOA circle/dot.

I setup my 507C identical to the 507K, by deactivating the solar feature and setting intensity to a comfortable level outside in bright sunshine. This works great indoors for me, as well. I activated "shake awake" in both, after becoming confident by performing a few tests to understand and verify function.

I have been extremely pleased with these optics. I don't carry my P365 every day, but it's pretty close to that. I carry OWB at 2:30 and usually tuck my shirt behind the holster on entering my truck (for unobstructed access if necessary), then re-cover when exiting.

When I pull my P365 from the safe, I verify the MS is engaged, press check, and verify the optic is on. I've never been disappointed. The optic is always illuminated. I then hold it up to a light and check for excessive dust/lint or fingerprints on the lens.

I would say I feel the need to clean the lens once every week or two. I keep a can of canned air and cleaning swabs readily handy for this purpose. Wiping with a dry swab and a quick puff of air is usually adequate. However, I occasionally dip a swab in alcohol, roll it on a cloth and use the dampened swab, if necessary.

I've never left them on continuously, so I can't comment on battery life when doing so. However, I can say after using the shake awake feature for close to a year, I have not noticed any decrease in intensity. Regardless, I plan to change batteries annually, on my birthday.

Hope this helps. These are some awesome optics.
 

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Just can't wrap my mind around the utility of a solar panel on an RDS marketed for concealed carry mounts. Mine stays in the dark most of the time. Sure, some folks will find a use for it on other, non-CCW mounts but aren't there already a number of worthy offerings for that niche? It seems like they added "real estate" as part of enclosing the emitter and some one (in management??) couldn't resist suggesting a use for that real estate irrespective of any need.
 
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Just can't wrap my mind around the utility of a solar panel on an RDS marketed for concealed carry mounts. Mine stays in the dark most of the time. Sure, some folks will find a use for it on other, non-CCW mounts but aren't there already a number of worthy offerings for that niche? It seems like they added "real estate" as part of enclosing the emitter and some one (in management??) couldn't resist suggesting a use for that real estate irrespective of any need.
I think the solar is more of a failsafe. If your battery dies, as long as you have light, you have a dot. But I also don't see much utility and would have no problem if they removed it from the optic. Kinda gimmicky IMO but also doesn't seem to affect utility or durability, so I don't mind it.
 

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The solar is a pain. As ambient light changes, the solar causes the dot brightness to change in a way many don’t care for. Everyone I know who runs them full time, shuts the solar feature. Myself included.
This makes sense. In devices that use solar to trickle-charge a rechargeable battery that drives the device, variation in solar won't impact performance, since the battery drives the device at all times and solar just recharges it. In this Holosun's case, the battery is non-rechargeable, so the design requires an "either/or" approach to using one power source or the other. Hence the variable performance Pete reports.

For me, I'm intrigued by the closed emitter, but if it requires being hostage to my local winter's sun-free days or feeble indoor light to drive an el-cheapo plastic/dye solar cell that will not last many years before degrading...no thanks. In a sunny area, it can be far more practical. Hopefully Holosun will offer a solar-free version of the close emitter optic for those of us not living in the sunny South!
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
I've never left them on continuously, so I can't comment on battery life when doing so. However, I can say after using the shake awake feature for close to a year, I have not noticed any decrease in intensity. Regardless, I plan to change batteries annually, on my birthday.
I run a 507C with the shake awake disabled, and run the brightness setting the same way you do.
In April 2019 I installed a new battery @ 3.34 Volts.
October 2021, voltage measured 3.07 volts.

I also plan to change batteries once a year, but they do hold up well in case you forget.
 

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You kill the auto brightness setting.
On the 407 and 507’s (C and K) you press and hold the + for 3 seconds.
Ah, ok thanks. That's what I thought, just wanted to make sure. Probably a semantics thing; I had never heard of it called "shut the solar off". The manual just talks about Auto, Manual, and Lockout modes. I get it tho, I use Manual all the time for all three of my Holosuns. I found Auto to be pretty annoying.

Back to the optic: Subdued graphics. IP8 waterproof. Closed cell optic. Cool.

Be interesting to see if the bodies are Titanium or just Aluminum 7075. I like the enclosed optic option for the (what I assume is) RMSC footprint, making a direct screw on for a P365/X/XL optic cut slide. And they kept the integral rear sight nubs on the thinner one.

Anybody catch that the screw spacing on both of these is the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
This makes sense. In devices that use solar to trickle-charge a rechargeable battery that drives the device, variation in solar won't impact performance, since the battery drives the device at all times and solar just recharges it. In this Holosun's case, the battery is non-rechargeable, so the design requires an "either/or" approach to using one power source or the other. Hence the variable performance Pete reports.

For me, I'm intrigued by the closed emitter, but if it requires being hostage to my local winter's sun-free days or feeble indoor light to drive an el-cheapo plastic/dye solar cell that will not last many years before degrading...no thanks. In a sunny area, it can be far more practical. Hopefully Holosun will offer a solar-free version of the close emitter optic for those of us not living in the sunny South!
The battery life in these is ridiculously long. They rate them at something like 50,000 hours, but a lot of people change them once a year to be sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Ah, ok thanks. That's what I thought, just wanted to make sure. Probably a semantics thing; I had never heard of it called "shut the solar off". The manual just talks about Auto, Manual, and Lockout modes. I get it tho, I use Manual all the time for all three of my Holosuns. I found Auto to be pretty annoying.

Back to the optic: Subdued graphics. IP8 waterproof. Closed cell optic. Cool.

Be interesting to see if the bodies are Titanium or just Aluminum 7075. I like the enclosed optic option for the (what I assume is) RMSC footprint, making a direct screw on for a P365/X/XL optic cut slide. And they kept the integral rear sight nubs on the thinner one.

Anybody catch that the screw spacing on both of these is the same?
It’s my understanding that the footprint and bolt spacing on both of these versions is the same.
 

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The solar is a pain. As ambient light changes, the solar causes the dot brightness to change in a way many don’t care for. Everyone I know who runs them full time, shuts the solar feature. Myself included.
The auto adjust feature I think is what you're talking about, it's controlled by a sensor in the solar cell but is not the solar itself. Turning off the auto adjust does not turn off or disable the solar back up feature. It'll still help extend battery life and provide a solar only back up if the battery dies.
 

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For me, I'm intrigued by the closed emitter, but if it requires being hostage to my local winter's sun-free days or feeble indoor light to drive an el-cheapo plastic/dye solar cell that will not last many years before degrading...no thanks. In a sunny area, it can be far more practical. Hopefully Holosun will offer a solar-free version of the close emitter optic for those of us not living in the sunny South!
You won't be held hostage by the solar panel. I don't know anyone that runs a Holosun on auto-adjust. All their current models have a manual brightness selection and lock-in function. Admittedly, they could change that for these new models, but I see no reason for them to do so. I'd happily put money on being able to turn off the auto-adjust.

Be interesting to see if the bodies are Titanium or just Aluminum 7075.
If prior models are anything to go off of, these will be titanium. In the past, only the titanium models have had the embossed logos. I presently own 3 Holosuns and that rule holds true.
 
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The solar is a pain. As ambient light changes, the solar causes the dot brightness to change in a way many don’t care for. Everyone I know who runs them full time, shuts the solar feature. Myself included.
Interesting. I haven't noticed that happening at all on my 507c. I also don't have auto-adjust, nor do I want it.

Just can't wrap my mind around the utility of a solar panel on an RDS marketed for concealed carry mounts. Mine stays in the dark most of the time...
The RDS is not dependent on solar to function. It augments the power draw from the battery, increasing the lifespan of the battery. Or at least that's what it does on the 507c.
 

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The RDS is not dependent on solar to function. It augments the power draw from the battery, increasing the lifespan of the battery. Or at least that's what it does on the 507c.
@Hammer, that makes a ton more sense than using either one or the other as the sole power source. Thanks for sharpening my understanding!
 

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Holosun was able to release this without so much hype and fanfare while Sig’s Romeo 2 is still missing in action 😆.
I forgot that optic "existed." $600 preorder on Midway. DOA in my opinion, 507k is already superior and now with this new Holosun there's absolutely no reason to go with the Sig other than brand loyalty.
 

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The solar is a pain. As ambient light changes, the solar causes the dot brightness to change in a way many don’t care for. Everyone I know who runs them full time, shuts the solar feature. Myself included.
I love the auto-brightness. In competition we sometimes shoot from inside vehicles or in the dark and it's so nice to have the optic adjust for the light versus having to break my grip to manually adjust it or leave it so bright that it blinds you in the dark.

The solar panel serves two functions. 1) It saves battery life. 2) It's a failsafe in the event the battery dies.

It doesn't "charge" the battery. It doesn't do anything other than provide power (or partial power) to the optic. It's a very innovative feature I wish all optics had.

Here's what Holosun's website says:

Holosun’s Solar Failsafe Technology is an innovative feature pioneered by Holosun in red dot sights. Solar Failsafe allows the red dot sight to remain powered when your battery fails. Holosun optics with Solar Failsafe feature automatic brightness adjustment; when you’re under the sun you have a bright reticle, when you move indoors it will automatically dim down to match ambient lighting conditions.
 

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I love the auto-brightness. In competition we sometimes shoot from inside vehicles or in the dark and it's so nice to have the optic adjust for the light versus having to break my grip to manually adjust it or leave it so bright that it blinds you in the dark.

The solar panel serves two functions. 1) It saves battery life. 2) It's a failsafe in the event the battery dies.

It doesn't "charge" the battery. It doesn't do anything other than provide power (or partial power) to the optic. It's a very innovative feature I wish all optics had.

Here's what Holosun's website says:

Holosun’s Solar Failsafe Technology is an innovative feature pioneered by Holosun in red dot sights. Solar Failsafe allows the red dot sight to remain powered when your battery fails. Holosun optics with Solar Failsafe feature automatic brightness adjustment; when you’re under the sun you have a bright reticle, when you move indoors it will automatically dim down to match ambient lighting conditions.
I'm also a fan of the auto brightness. It works great and I use it on a 507k, 507 with vulcan reticle, and a 510 C GR. Once in a while it won't get bright enough so I have to manually bump it up real quick which is no big deal. It's easy enough to shut off if you don't want it so I doubt Holosun will ever decide to offer optics without it. Not enough demand.
 

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The RDS is not dependent on solar to function. It augments the power draw from the battery, increasing the lifespan of the battery. Or at least that's what it does on the 507c.
Oh, I recognize that. It "augments the power draw from the battery" but that can only happen when the gun is exposed to adequate light (i.e., solar). So, if you keep the weapon concealed it ain't getting exposure to solar. Perhaps, if you frequent an outdoor range you might achieve sufficient exposure to be of some benefit but that would only occur during your actual time at the range. For larger, duty weapons that are open carried there might be sufficient longer term exposure but that cannot be the case for concealed carry, as I indicated. In any event, considering the CR1632 battery costs about $6.00 ea and last for 50,000 hrs, how essential could it be to "augment" that power draw? I guess in a true combat scenario, rather than SD or HD, where access to replacement batteries might be constrained then a case could be made for having a solar backup. Other than that, personally, I don't see it as anything other than an additional potential point of failure.
 
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Oh, I recognize that. It "augments the power draw from the battery" but that can only happen when the gun is exposed to adequate light (i.e., solar). So, if you keep the weapon concealed it ain't getting exposure to solar. Perhaps, if you frequent an outdoor range you might achieve sufficient exposure to be of some benefit but that would only occur during your actual time at the range. For larger, duty weapons that are open carried there might be sufficient longer term exposure but that cannot be the case for concealed carry, as I indicated. In any event, considering the CR1632 battery costs about $6.00 ea and last for 50,000 hrs, how essential could it be to "augment" that power draw? I guess in a true combat scenario, rather than SD or HD, where access to replacement batteries might be constrained then a case could be made for having a solar backup. Other than that, personally, I don't see it as anything other than an additional potential point of failure.
But if it fails, then what? The solar panel isn't an essential functional point of the optic. As far as I'm aware, the worst that can happen if the solar panel goes down is that you just don't get that added perk. It won't cause increased battery drain or functional issues. The only problem I could see is if we're paying extra for solar that's just built into the price of the optic, in which case sure, I'd rather have a cheaper version without the panel. But if we're not really paying any extra, and it doesn't harm the overall functionality of the optic if it fails, then who really cares?
 
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