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Their ammo is cheap relative to everything else but be careful with it and expect to get a squib or four. I first ordered 500 rounds of 200 gr .45ACP from them last year at a pretty low price. It turns out it was low for a reason in that they may save money on powder and not include any in some of the ammo. With that first 500 I experienced my first squib. The ammo didn't feed well in either my Sig P220 or my Dan Wesson 1911 which is largely due to the flat nosed TMJ. Somehow this year their computer system had a brain fart and shipped me another 500. I figured well it's not great ammo but that's free brass for the reloading I'm about to do. Well, I haven't shot all of it yet, probably about 250-300 or so of the 2nd batch of 500 and I had my third squib from the 2nd batch today. Kind of a dangerous way to get reloading brass but I'm getting pretty adept at recognizing and dealing with squib loads. I just wanted to put this out there so people know to be wary with this company's ammo. It is accurate though when it feeds and they put some powder in it. Here's a link to what I have. https://fedarm.com/product/45-acp-200-grain-tmj-lead-core-fn/
 

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Sorry to hear about the troubles that ammo's been giving you. I just took a look at the FedArm website, and they seem to be more of a reloader than an OEM as they claim to be. The headstamps ranged from LC (Lake City/Federal) to Speer to GFL (Fiocchi).

Hopefully, none of the cases have been reworked enough to show signs of splits or other deformities.
 

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If it was me and I do suggest this for you or someone else in a similar situation;
Pull the projectiles, dump the powder then resize the brass after removing the decapper pin

You are risking a serious and dangerous failure and whatever shooting you may be doing is detracting from your training not helping it

IMO
 

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Only once-fired military and police brass is used in loading. This brass is acid washed, processed to SAAMI specifications, and electromagnetically inspected for thin walls and defects to ensure safe internal tolerances.

In the loading process, FedArm uses only the top quality powders and primers. Powder is dropped to +/- 0.1 grain accuracy to ensure the highest accuracy.
I'd email/call them and question them on this.
 
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