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To anyone out there that owns a MCX Virtus (in 5.56) - how does it compare to "regular" DI AR's? Is it worth the extra money?

I see them in stock regularly at one of my LGS's, and have been kicking around the idea of getting one, but Im just not sure if it's really worth it. I own a few AR's, from cheap PSA's to a nicer BCM / Vltor build that I did.

If you own one - what swayed you in that direction?
 

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Well, I'll start. I own two MCX Virtus rifles, 11.5 and 16. I also own two DI AR rifles, both made by Centurion Arms in 11.5 and 14.5. These are all quality, well made rifles that shoot well. The main advantages of a piston operated rifle are the clean operation with respect to the bolt and chamber, and also historically better reliability in a sustained fire situation. The bolts in the MCX's just don't get dirty. The bolts in the DI guns are filthy after a hundred rounds. The MCX Virtus has a very mild recoil impulse for a piston rifle. Very little difference between them and the DI guns. I also have several 516s, and the recoil impulse of those rifles is significantly harsher than the MCX or the DI rifles. Factory trigger on the MCX Virtus is generally superior to factory mil-spec trigger on typical DI rifles. My DI rifles have Geissele replacement triggers. Cost is really not that much difference between a quality DI rifle (DD, LMT, KAC, SOLGW, Cent. Arms) and factory list for a MCX Virtus. Prices for all firearms are out of control right now due to political unrest and pending election. I really like my MCX Virtus rifles, and if I buy anymore long guns in 5.56, they are going to be MCX Virtus models. They are just very accurate and very pleasant to shoot, with the added bonus that they don't require constant cleaning.
 

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Well, I'll start. I own two MCX Virtus rifles, 11.5 and 16. I also own two DI AR rifles, both made by Centurion Arms in 11.5 and 14.5. These are all quality, well made rifles that shoot well. The main advantages of a piston operated rifle are the clean operation with respect to the bolt and chamber, and also historically better reliability in a sustained fire situation. The bolts in the MCX's just don't get dirty. The bolts in the DI guns are filthy after a hundred rounds. The MCX Virtus has a very mild recoil impulse for a piston rifle. Very little difference between them and the DI guns. I also have several 516s, and the recoil impulse of those rifles is significantly harsher than the MCX or the DI rifles. Factory trigger on the MCX Virtus is generally superior to factory mil-spec trigger on typical DI rifles. My DI rifles have Geissele replacement triggers. Cost is really not that much difference between a quality DI rifle (DD, LMT, KAC, SOLGW, Cent. Arms) and factory list for a MCX Virtus. Prices for all firearms are out of control right now due to political unrest and pending election. I really like my MCX Virtus rifles, and if I buy anymore long guns in 5.56, they are going to be MCX Virtus models. They are just very accurate and very pleasant to shoot, with the added bonus that they don't require constant cleaning.

Also being able to fold the stock workout a funky adapter that inhibits function is a plus.

Likewise the modularity to just pull a pin to swap handguards or one bolt to swap socks or two bolts to swap barrels.


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I concur with the above statements and will add the ability to change calibers between 556 and 300 in a matter of minutes is a plus too. I do find that the MCX platform has slight weight bias towards the front and does not feel as "balanced" but overall it's a pleasure to shoot. I just received my 6.75" 300 barrel and have not had the time to shoot it yet.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys! Appreciate the answers. I own a MPX, which I absolutely love and it makes sense over an AR9. These answers make sense to me
 

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I shot an MCX legacy and my 516 same day, same ammo..516 was heavier feeling than mcx. I really liked mcx better.
But costs are stupid as of late.
Not sure difference in mcx vs virtus weight.
 

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I shot an MCX legacy and my 516 same day, same ammo..516 was heavier feeling than mcx. I really liked mcx better.
But costs are stupid as of late.
Not sure difference in mcx vs virtus weight.
The weight is close to the same for the 516 and Virtus. However, I believe the virtus is better balanced than the 516, and thus does not "feel" as heavy, even though it may be.
 

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The advantage of the MCX series is modularity, but the modularity is expensive. The MCXs have no buffer tube so the stock can fold forward. MCXs and MPXs are very similar which gives a choice of three calibers, two of which use less expensive ammo in normal times.

The DI rifles lack modularity, but cost less and tend to weigh less. Parts are more universally available for DI rifles due to standardization.

Start with DI rifles unless you have a deep pocket.

Bill
 

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Weight Comparisons: 516 vs. Virtus

Ok, so I decided to weigh my 11.5" Virtus and my 10" 516. The Virtus came in at approximately 2.6 ounces heavier. But as I stated above, due to its better balance, it feels "lighter" when you're holding it. Photos:

MCX Virtus:

3748B154-5BE8-415B-B08F-4C8988190418_1_201_a.jpeg

516:

F665CE49-9AC5-41F3-9135-81456A4B5FF3_1_201_a.jpeg

Both rifles:

FABB3DEC-6266-412B-988D-5E145EF4C6B5_1_201_a.jpeg
 

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Optics are the same: Sig Romeo4T red dot on each. Yes, the forward grip was left on the 516. It is polymer, so not very heavy.

It's probably 2-3 oz, so I guess that means the weight is a wash.


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All good points above! My 1st center-fire long gun was Colt's 6920. Luv'ed on that rifle for years, and our adult son still does.

Added Arsenal's SAM7 AK and really enjoyed shooting that long stroke piston gun. Its folding stock was handy too, but other AK design elements and and overall build weren't impressive.

My AR10 is PWS' Mk20 DMR long-stroke piston setup that's a great shooter too. I thought HK416 was gonna be my next gun. However, SIG's 516 arrived in a 10" pistol format. That pistol went SBR and added a 14.5 upper for travel. I still think SIG's 516 super-solid design is better than HK.

When MCX rolled out in 2015, well IMO, this platform does it all so well - It's been all MCX here, since their '15 intro. As mentioned, MCX's modular design can become expensive. Not their individual unit cost, but in the additional components you'll 'need' after that initial purchase.

Currently, I have 2 MCX lowers - 1 SBR & a long rifle lower. Naturally, I've added these 5.56 (top) and 300Blk (bottom) barrel kits, and assorted handguards, butt stocks, etc, etc...



Guess the choice really depends on how much you shoot rifle and in what different applications you're running your guns...


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There is one important point that I left out about the modularity of the MCXs. SIG is essentially the only supplier of NIB parts like barrel kits AND they are all out of stock now because their parts are going into new rifles.

Bill
 

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There is one important point that I left out about the modularity of the MCXs. SIG is essentially the only supplier of NIB parts like barrel kits AND they are all out of stock now because their parts are going into new rifles.

Bill

There are aftermarket handguards, stocks and braces, triggers, buffers, and even pistons.

Barrels are the thing we really need to see open sourced to the aftermarket now.


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