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Amatuer gunsmithing gone wrong

1960 Views 24 Replies 19 Participants Last post by  Nugget
Pretty interesting, but sad video about this girl. Apparently a gun goes off without being touched, yikes!!Give it watch.

https://bearingarms.com/bob-o/2017/...ng-nearly-costs-competitive-shooter-her-life/
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Damn!

I don't see much difference between parts. Could that just have been wear from a whole lot of use from the previous owner who she says was a competitive shooter?

I'm a diy'er and I'll build, take apart, fix and modify just about anything but my guns remain just like they came from the factory. Grips and a manufacturer supplied caliber conversion kits would be the exception.
 

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Holy cow... thank God she's alright and still has her leg and life. Really makes you take a step back and realize why spending 250 on an armorers course is NOTHING compared to thousands and thousands in medical bills and the potential physical and emotional damages...
 

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Scary for sure glad she wasn't killed or injured even worse.
Exactly why I stick to my skill skill set building/remodeling, I've built houses from the basement floor up to the cap on the chimney and theres nothing I haven't done on a house in 45+ years I worked at it.
I could I do more on guns if I chose to but I for my safety and those around me when shooting I prefer to leave the gun smithing to well a gunsmith.
I have swiped out mainspring housings, mag releases and 1911 hammers in the past and wouldn't have an issue with doing it again but for the most part anything beyond switching a set of grips, maintenance consisting of spring replacements and general breakdown for cleaning I leave to the certified pros and not self professed ones. :eek:
 

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That is sad, no question, though it does raise questions about how the accident happened. Why was a cocked gun holstered while not on safe? Was the safety tested for functionality? Why was the gun, the very least, not given a function check that most certainly would have shown up an improperly fitted sear/hammer or non functional safety?

As many of you may be aware, I'm a hobby gunsmith, machinist, and inventor and tinkerer who has a hard time not trying to improve most anything mechanical so unfortunate as to come into my possession. Whenever I'm finished with a gun, it gets a function check. On a semi-auto, that includes dry fire and hold the trigger, then slingshot the slide 20 times - no hammer follow. Cock the gun, wrap in a rag, and use my big rubber "drop test" mallet to wail away (within reason) on the gun from each direction to simulate a drop test.

Any good gunsmith checks his work, even one like me. I know what angle I have ground the sear and how much relief cut, the height of the hammer hooks (1911) the strength of the sear, disconnector, and trigger return springs and how each add to trigger pull.

The message is clear and true, if you don't know what you are doing, don't. However, there are thousands of amatuer and hobby gunsmiths who DO know what they are doing.
 

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I spent 30 years in floor covering.
Luckily I was in commercial because in retail it is a industry where everyone knows all about how to install. I can't begin to count the times I was asked to help fix a screwed up project.

There is nothing in this world where amateurs have more than 2% of the knoledge and technique of an experienced pro.
Most things in life we only really learn the hard way. Technique is only a product of time and practice.

I count myself very fortunate because I get used to triggers, sighs and such easily.
I have shot custom and 1911s and the best trigger jobs.
I am quite happy and enjoy shooting my off the shelf standard guns.
 
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Some of the narrative raises questions in my mind about what really happened and how. Regardless, this is why I feel better buying BNIB. I admittedly don't have enough in depth knowledge to strip down a firearm at purchase and say this has been altered or not in a good way, safe way, or bad way. Hope she recovers fully though.
Ouch .. very luck lady !! One reason I don't alter any of mine .. don't have the knowledge to safely do anything other then grips .. all my pistols came new in box from a distributor or FFL ..

The suggestion that you have a tourniquet is a life saving suggestion and it could save your life or a loved ones .. Think they are well worth the price as are some of the treated bandages that stop bleeding ..

Was wondering how was her holster against her body to cause a wound like that .. I wear at OWB at 5 and if mine were to go off it might barely cause a glancing would that would barely go in the flesh or even miss entirely .. her wound appears deep through the leg ..
 

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Well, I'm gonna be that guy that disagrees.

It's a very sad story for sure and I'm very glad she will be alright.

I think in this case, it's WHAT was done to her gun vs whether or not something WAS done to the gun. The profiling of a sear in that gun which was an M&P is not something just anyone should do. It is much safer, and more advisable, to get the Apex sear kit and install it. Cheap and safe. I have them in all my full size M&P's (3)

I am not sure how those parts are hardened from the factory but if it is a surface hardening, removing material will also remove the hardening and then the metal will wear with each shot leading to the unfortunate incident in question.

I don't own a pistol I haven't done something too.....
 

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Seems like she also walks thru walls at the 1:15 and 1:30 mark in her stage video. Aren't the 2x4s on ground supposed to represent walls/barriers? If so she even started her stage by running left and shooting thru two of them?

Lucky she didn't lose her foot. Previous owner has probably already been served.
 

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Saw that earlier on FB
She was Stupid Not to have a Used Gun Checked by a GS If She Did Not know how to Herself. Just Plain Common Sense when You purchase a used Firearm especially before You take it out to shoot it. Double So If You are using it for Competition Shooting.
 

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Saw that earlier on FB
She was Stupid Not to have a Used Gun Checked by a GS If She Did Not know how to Herself. Just Plain Common Sense when You purchase a used Firearm especially before You take it out to shoot it. Double So If You are using it for Competition Shooting.
 

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One of the reasons to always keep original parts and return a gun to stock before selling it, when possible.
 

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And that's why, as much as I love tinkering, I don't ever mess around with sear geometry. Internal polish / lightened springs is the most I'll do. I don't even mess with over-travel screws after experiencing the USP's Match trigger kit. It literally takes two thou to go from a functioning gun to a paperweight... Or worse. That's also why I stay away from the GG P-SAIT. The whole function rests on just the strength of the Loctite.
 

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And that's why, as much as I love tinkering, I don't ever mess around with sear geometry. Internal polish / lightened springs is the most I'll do. I don't even mess with over-travel screws after experiencing the USP's Match trigger kit. It literally takes two thou to go from a functioning gun to a paperweight... Or worse. That's also why I stay away from the GG P-SAIT. The whole function rests on just the strength of the Loctite.
Okay, I agree with you. If one is not knowledgeable, mechanically adept, and does not have the right fixtures and tooling, it is wise to follow your advice. If that be the case you can stick with stock or send it to someone like TheSigArmorer if you would like it much better than stock.


Another option is to do it yourself if you do know your limitations, and it sounds as if you do. Me? I've been destroying or working on mechanical things most all my life. Blessed to have a full machine shop, including TIG, plasma cutter, lathe, mill, you name it. And a gunsmith shop too, with the requisite fixtures and jigs. To be clear, I most certainly do not know it all. I'll work on any gun (of my own), but specialize in SIGs, lever guns, Ruger SA, 1911's and some Brownings, and a few more. It's important to know what you don't know. And figure on mistakes being made, especially when experimenting with making parts to modify and improve guns as I enjoy doing. Changing one thing will often change another in timing and function. That's why one is wise to do a function and safety check before calling it finished.

Another post mentioned changing sear angle and exposing soft metal underneath. That's true, especially with most older guns with surface hardened parts. It's a simple process using Kasenit to harden the mating surfaces when finished, this insures long wearing reliable work. MIM parts are through hardened, hand lapping doesn't remove temper or expose soft material on those or typical tool steel parts as used in many modern firearms.

The negligent discharge in the subject instance appears to have been caused by a chain of events, actions, and inactions. All of which were unfortunate and some involved no small amount of stupidity I suspect. Don't paint hobby gunsmiths with too broad a brush based on some gun owner's incompetence.
 
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