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Am I the only one having trouble accurately shooting the p365 series?

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Am I the only one having a difficult time with accuracy with the 365 series?
I have the 365, the 365X, the 365 XL, and the 365 macro, and I just shoot low no matter which one it is.
I don’t have that problem with my P320 scorpion, my P320X carry, my PPQ M2,WC Experior Compact, I just don’t get it. With all of these others on the range, I shoot the target center out with no problem. But when I put a P365 in my hands I struggle.

They are super comfortable to carry and super reliable, I have not had any problems at all. I want to love them!

Help!

Pete
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Maybe the small grips don't work for you. Have you tried a Wilson Combat grip module? I've read they're larger from front to rear.

I've handled a P365 at a gun store and realized quickly that if Iever get one it'll need a grip sleeve or different grip module to fit my hands better.
I just put an Icarus Precision grip module on mine, and that thing feels amazing.
 

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Yes, the 365 series is one of the easiest firearms to shoot accurately versus all other hand guns of any size or configuration. They have some of the nicest most satisfying triggers of any hand gun period. I am mesmerized by how nice the triggers feel. Silky smooth, light, fluid, crisp and consistent. No grit, no stacking, no hard release requiring an over travel stop.

That is assuming you are using the trigger correctly. Pull to the wall and then use firm smooth consistent pressure like a double action revolver with the inner part of your pad or the actual first knuckle. You will be rewarded with what is the standard for all striker fired pistols.

If you try to use it like a hard wall 1911 or S&W staged single action you will leave a lot of potential unrealized. It is obvious that it was designed by engineers from the double action perspective.
 

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There are a few members that have posted they are not accurate with the 365. It's the user. The 365 line is as accurate as any other pistol. Practice, understand it, and keep shooting. If not lmk if you'd like to sell any.
Agree. I use an RDS and the gun's accuracy while using a rest is exceptional. When I go off-hand, however, I tend to hit slightly low and left unless I really concentrate on holding a tighter grip and squeezing only my trigger finger. If I relax at all I will end up squeezing all of my fingers which then shifts my POI low and left.
 

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Some great comments / observations in this thread, and I'll add a couple more. Someone mentioned the Wilson Combat grip module, and I have one (not installed yet though). Just by observation and feel, it is "bigger" in a couple of key dimensions vs. standard sig grip:
  • wider / fatter in the middle of the grip - maybe 1/8 (by my eye balling it) - it fits the palm better
  • front strap seems about same as sigs. but back strap is different in 2 areas:
a. the curve up to the beavertail is a little longer (ie, it's back slightly into your hand
b. lower back strap doesn't is flatter, doesn't curve away from your hand as much.
All of the above fills a large hand quite well (I have fairly large hands). Note that I accomplished the same by adding a talon grip, plus some extra talon strips to the back strap (I did this before WC introduced their grip module). And now there are other grip modules available as well (which I am not familiar with though).

Have you thought about the flat trigger versus curved option? I took 6 months evaluating this after getting the XL. Bottom line for me is I went with flat on all 365s and XLs. I found the flat trigger broke about when trigger was vertical - the curved trigger broke slightly(about 1.5 mm) further rearward (again for me). 1.5 mm doesn't see like much, but it meant my trigger finger curled just a bit more to break the shot. I feel I can be more consistent with flat triggers, but YMMV.

There are a couple of trigger control (consistency) drills I recommend to students. One is dry fire, but with your eyes closed (train your brain to feel the trigger: take up, wall, then break). Closing your eyes removes the added brain functions/distractions of sight alignment, sight picture, etc - allows focus on just the trigger. Second drill is to practice what I call quick fire. essentially, you have 2 seconds to present the gun (from high ready position) and make 1st shot, then 2 second for 2nd shot. You can also add a 3rd and 4th follow up shot within 2 seconds as well. With practice 1.5 second follow up shots is quite doable (pro shooters do this in under 1 second). You can do this anywhere from 5 to maybe 10 yds (I do 10 yds) - and the goal is for all shots to be within a 5-6 inch circle around your POA. This does a number of things:
  • forces a front sight focus (dont have time for 4- 5 second well aimed/aligned shots) - essentially a flash sight picture that you'd be using in a self defense situation anyway
  • forces consistent trigger manipulation (if not, you'll know it with the errant shot). With practice, I've found I can get quickly into a rhythm for a 3- 5 shot strings.

Anyway, more food for thought
 

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Have you thought about the flat trigger versus curved option?
Aside from the trigger breaking in the vertical position with the flat trigger, I find that my trigger finger rubs less on the trigger guard since I switched triggers. After a few hundred rounds, that rubbing can cause hot spots on the outside of the tip of my trigger finger.
Automotive exterior Gun barrel Trigger Gun accessory Composite material
 

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Lots of good stuff here. I am new to Sigs and striker fired in general. A recent P365 XL was my first in both categories. Out of the box I was shooting low and to the right. I quickly figured out the combat sights. I've upgraded to the Wilson grip frame which fits my hand better. And extended magazines give me some place to park my pinkie. Grip matters. Groups are still a tad right, but getting better with practice. And the difference between this design and my 1911s and CZs hasn't seemed to effect my accuracy with them.
 

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And extended magazines give me some place to park my pinkie. Grip matters.
I know sub compact pistols are great for concealment, but you give up a lot if you can't get your pinky on the gun. A well known trainer (goes by "carry trainer" on youtube) calls it "pinky power" in one of his grip videos. Middle, ring, and pinky fingers are what you use to pull gun back in to your palm (shooting hand thumb basically along for the ride - especially in a thumbs forward grip). the pinky is also a counter force to muzzle rise.

"grip matters" - yup, grip is the first thing I evaluate about a student (beginners as well as advanced shooters). It's rare there isn't something I can suggest they work on/change (up to them if they want to though). A solid and consistent grip (and there are several good ones) is needed to be - well, consistent.
 

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I know sub compact pistols are great for concealment, but you give up a lot if you can't get your pinky on the gun. A well known trainer (goes by "carry trainer" on youtube) calls it "pinky power" in one of his grip videos. Middle, ring, and pinky fingers are what you use to pull gun back in to your palm (shooting hand thumb basically along for the ride - especially in a thumbs forward grip). the pinky is also a counter force to muzzle rise.

"grip matters" - yup, grip is the first thing I evaluate about a student (beginners as well as advanced shooters). It's rare there isn't something I can suggest they work on/change (up to them if they want to though). A solid and consistent grip (and there are several good ones) is needed to be - well, consistent.
One of the reasons I have extended mags as only backup magazines for my compacts is so that I can get consistent training with having my pinky unsupported. I rarely use an extended magazine in my P365 or P938 at the range, and I even bought some 9-round flush-fit magazines for my G30SF just to train with it that way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
I know it is not a target pistol… being super accurate in a real defensive situation is the goal! If you can’t be accurate on the range, you won’t be accurate in a real situation
BTW my Wilson is not a target pistol as I carry it as well… it is a great range gun true, mine is the Experior double stack compact and the same size as an X Carry … the P365 XL is my deep concealment
 

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aa
I know it is not a target pistol… being super accurate in a real defensive situation is the goal! If you can’t be accurate on the range, you won’t be accurate in a real situation
Point shooting a 4” group at typical encounter range will end a real-world threat. The 10-ring on a B-27 target at 7 yards is eminently possible to achieve with a standard P365, and accurate enough for the purpose. At longer distances the 9-ring is sufficient.
 
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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Some great comments / observations in this thread, and I'll add a couple more. Someone mentioned the Wilson Combat grip module, and I have one (not installed yet though). Just by observation and feel, it is "bigger" in a couple of key dimensions vs. standard sig grip:
  • wider / fatter in the middle of the grip - maybe 1/8 (by my eye balling it) - it fits the palm better
  • front strap seems about same as sigs. but back strap is different in 2 areas:
a. the curve up to the beavertail is a little longer (ie, it's back slightly into your hand
b. lower back strap doesn't is flatter, doesn't curve away from your hand as much.
All of the above fills a large hand quite well (I have fairly large hands). Note that I accomplished the same by adding a talon grip, plus some extra talon strips to the back strap (I did this before WC introduced their grip module). And now there are other grip modules available as well (which I am not familiar with though).

Have you thought about the flat trigger versus curved option? I took 6 months evaluating this after getting the XL. Bottom line for me is I went with flat on all 365s and XLs. I found the flat trigger broke about when trigger was vertical - the curved trigger broke slightly(about 1.5 mm) further rearward (again for me). 1.5 mm doesn't see like much, but it meant my trigger finger curled just a bit more to break the shot. I feel I can be more consistent with flat triggers, but YMMV.

There are a couple of trigger control (consistency) drills I recommend to students. One is dry fire, but with your eyes closed (train your brain to feel the trigger: take up, wall, then break). Closing your eyes removes the added brain functions/distractions of sight alignment, sight picture, etc - allows focus on just the trigger. Second drill is to practice what I call quick fire. essentially, you have 2 seconds to present the gun (from high ready position) and make 1st shot, then 2 second for 2nd shot. You can also add a 3rd and 4th follow up shot within 2 seconds as well. With practice 1.5 second follow up shots is quite doable (pro shooters do this in under 1 second). You can do this anywhere from 5 to maybe 10 yds (I do 10 yds) - and the goal is for all shots to be within a 5-6 inch circle around your POA. This does a number of things:
  • forces a front sight focus (dont have time for 4- 5 second well aimed/aligned shots) - essentially a flash sight picture that you'd be using in a self defense situation anyway
  • forces consistent trigger manipulation (if not, you'll know it with the errant shot). With practice, I've found I can get quickly into a rhythm for a 3- 5 shot strings.

Anyway, more food for thought
I like! Thanks for your suggestions… I will apply
 
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