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I am relatively a new subscriber to Sig Talk and this is my first post. My local Academy has 9mm NATO 124 grain ammo on sale and I was just reading online about the differences. I have a P226 Scorpion and P2022 both in 9mm. What is the general opinion, is the NATO ammo safe for these two pistols??

Thanks in Advance

Hammer5
 

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Yes, more than safe. The NATO rounds are made to be slightly hotter than standard Luger rounds, but they are perfectly safe to be used in your guns. Don't give it another thought.
 

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Our armed forces use NATO rounds. Remember SEALS used to use the P226. Totally safe.
They still use the P226. They just use the Glock 19 too. :cool:
 
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I love my SP2022. One recommendation though, someone decided that the guide rod for the 2022 didn't need to be stainless steel, and they used the same polymer as the frame. Bad decision in my opinion, especially if you're gonna shoot NATO or +p. I got a black finished SS guide rod on ebay for $16. I recommend you do the same.
 

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Not looking to start a fight here, just honest curiosity. What is so bad about a polymer guide rod in pistol like the 226 and sp2022? What stresses are they under and how often do they fail? My 226 Blackwater had a poly guide rod until I sent it in to Sig for service. It came back with a hollow steel one. Seems to run the same. My SP2022 in 9mm still has its original plastic one and after a few thousand rounds doesn't seem to be showing any problems. Neither does my 229 in 9mm with a lot more through it.
Just want to know the problems, what to look for, and the advantages a steel rod gives. I am a professional auto mechanic and know autos, but have much less knowledge with firearms.
 

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Not looking to start a fight here, just honest curiosity. What is so bad about a polymer guide rod in pistol like the 226 and sp2022?
Not sure...

They're expendable parts that I don't particularly feel bad about, when throwing them in the trash...
 

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You have to do a LOT of rapid shooting, but look up IraqVeteran8888 Glock Meltdown on YouTube. The first thing to go was the guide rod and he knew it would and had a SS one on standby. It is a weak link that doesn't cost much to mitigate. If you are following the "One Gun" apocalypse thread, would definitely want one with me in a **** situation.
 

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Ok, guess I don't have to worry much then. I am not an "Operator" and​don't have enough mags to dump fast enough to create that much heat in my pistols, especially with the hand loads I make. I am cheap so tend to run on the lighter side with my powder charges.
 

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Not looking to start a fight here, just honest curiosity. What is so bad about a polymer guide rod in pistol like the 226 and sp2022? What stresses are they under and how often do they fail? My 226 Blackwater had a poly guide rod until I sent it in to Sig for service. It came back with a hollow steel one. Seems to run the same. My SP2022 in 9mm still has its original plastic one and after a few thousand rounds doesn't seem to be showing any problems. Neither does my 229 in 9mm with a lot more through it.
Just want to know the problems, what to look for, and the advantages a steel rod gives. I am a professional auto mechanic and know autos, but have much less knowledge with firearms.
I had an issue with the polymer guide rod on a new SP2022. I had several jams on the first couple of magazines. When I took it apart I could see where the recoil spring had begun to dig into the polymer guide rod and taken some small chunks out of the sides. I evened out the big gouges with my pocket knife and used some sandpaper to smooth out the rest of the guide rod and the sharp edges of the recoil spring. It ran like a champ after that.
 

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I would have more rounds through my 2022, but the Utah highway patrol had it for about a year. They at least managed to recover it a day after it was stolen out of the small safe in my bedroom, but it took a long time for the courts to finish. At least I did get it back.
 

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Not looking to start a fight here, just honest curiosity. What is so bad about a polymer guide rod in pistol like the 226 and sp2022? What stresses are they under and how often do they fail?
Well, the job of the guide rod is to help control the movement of the slide, to help "guide" it. While failures (i.e. broken guide rods) are extremely rare with normal loads, it was such a minimal cost that I decided to upgrade despite the stats. Those odds go up with NATO or +p rounds though, as the amount of explosive force is greater. You can google "polymer guide rod failure" and see the kind of things that can happen.

There is however, another school of thought, that says polymer guide rods are better for the health of the gun because they are more flexible and absorb energy when they flex.

Personally I go with SS because I would rather be sure it's gonna work when I need it, especially in a gun I bring to the range frequently. It also adds more muzzle weight, which helps a lot with recoil in polymer frame pistols.

So there, that's probably more than two cents, but it's my thoughts on the subject.
 

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Sorry but the guide rod in any of my auto pistols have no influence on the slides. All they are doing is keeping the spring straight. And that seems with mine anyway, to have the biggest effect in the assembly process of putting the slide back on the pistol. I determined this by assembling and then operating the slide without a guide rod. I did use a platform for the spring to seat on at the back. I also did not try to fire the guns this way, just wanted to see if they could still move in a worst case. My Sig 1911 doesn't really have a guide rod, but it does have a cylinder for the spring to compress into.

To each their own. I am cheap and haven't found a pressing need to replace mine since​ they aren't even showing any wear marks.
 

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Sorry but the guide rod in any of my auto pistols have no influence on the slides. All they are doing is keeping the spring straight. And that seems with mine anyway, to have the biggest effect in the assembly process of putting the slide back on the pistol. I determined this by assembling and then operating the slide without a guide rod. I did use a platform for the spring to seat on at the back. I also did not try to fire the guns this way, just wanted to see if they could still move in a worst case. My Sig 1911 doesn't really have a guide rod, but it does have a cylinder for the spring to compress into.

To each their own. I am cheap and haven't found a pressing need to replace mine since​ they aren't even showing any wear marks.
 

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Sorry but the guide rod in any of my auto pistols have no influence on the slides. All they are doing is keeping the spring straight.
They are definitely for that as well, but it depends. The SP2022 has a grand total of about an inch of rail on each side. Guide rod helps keep the slide from striking the rail segments at any kind of angle. Less important with alloy/steel guns that have a full rail.
 
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