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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Wondering if anyone can help me on this.
My 938 ejector is stuck in the up position which is opposite of the usual ejector problem of it being stuck in the down position.:D
Not sure what happened; pistol was doing fine. When inserting a loaded mag the slide would not move forward but would function normally with an empty mag. Upon disassembly the slide would hang up at the ejector. I was able to push the ejector down just enough to get the slide off but it's stuck for sure.:mad:
I called Sig and because it's a used gun they won't warranty and want me to pay $105 with a 4-6 week lead time. I'm not happy.
I was thinking of trying to fix this myself but if the ejector is physically broken I would have to buy a new one. I guess thats my first question: where can I buy parts for this thing? (Top Gun doesnt list the ejector for this model).

Next question is probably for those that have completely disassembled a 938 or 238 before: is it possible to remove the little pin that holds the ejector and sear in place without removing the hammer, main spring and safety? I'm trying to make this as easy as possible.
Thanks in advance.
 

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It's not too hard to do. Watch these two videos, and pay close attention to the Hogue guy, including both diagrams. Using the masking tape over the pin holding the sear and ejector allows you to remove the ejector while leaving the sear pinned in the correct position (and believe me, replacing that sear in proper orientation is the most difficult part of this task if it comes out, so leave it where it is if the hammer still cocks and locks correctly).

YOU CAN STOP AFTER REMOVING THE HAMMER, and before removing the sear spring from the sear; there is no reason to touch the sear spring that's mounted in the mainspring housing. You only need the ejector/sear pin out a tiny bit to remove the ejector, then just ensure the ejector is orientated correctly, and reinstall everything. Remember to release tension off the hammer by first taking out the mainspring housing pin, THEN doing the hammer pin. And this would be an excellent time to get a one gallon ziplock bag to do this all in, in case a spring shoots out at you. The two springs most likely to fly are the safety spring and the hammer assembly, so take extra care while removing them.

On second thought, the Hogue guy's video is all you need to watch (watch video 1 and 2).

I think what you did was to force the ejector somehow forward of(or behind?) the bar it rests on. I reinstalled it this way once and had to remove it again.

This is not that bad to do, and I think you'll need the hammer out to have room to get the ejector. That sear is a PITA to replace though...did I mention that?

 

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You can read my entire trials and tribulations thread on this exact subject here, but you don't really need to, as I got a little whiny after thinking I broke my brand new P938. But the sear was the biggest obstacle to overcome with what I did, and you're not going to be removing it, so you should be fine. Read it and laugh with/at me after you complete your task, which could easily be done in an hour, as long you didn't bend the ejector out of shape..

http://sigtalk.com/sig-sauer-pistol...er-froglube-frame-internals-big-question.html


Also, if the parts are broken and weapon is out of warranty, you can get replacement parts from Sig customer service directly, I am told. the ejector can't be that expensive. Hopefully you didn't bend any part of the frame, such as the bar nearest the ejector/sear.
 

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I would think removing the sear/ejector would be much easier overall with the hammer/safety removed. Installing the sear and ejeector is challenging enough with the hammer out of the way. The hammer present would complicate further, IMHO. Hogue has a good video showing assembly/disassembly.

Can they not tell?
How would they know if the previous owner never registered?
 

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I would think removing the sear/ejector would be much easier overall with the hammer/safety removed. Hogue has a good video showing assembly/disassembly.

This is absolutely correct; hammer and safety need to be out. You can stop at the Hogue video though after removing the ejector, then reinstall from watching part 2 of the video. Make certain your function check includes the half-cock and release, full-cock and release, and safety engaging properly before putting everything back together.

I'd try the fix first, then if you can't do it try and get it done under warranty as MC has suggested. He's the person who told me parts are available from Sig directly, BTW.
 

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I would think removing the sear/ejector would be much easier overall with the hammer/safety removed. Installing the sear and ejeector is challenging enough with the hammer out of the way. The hammer present would complicate further, IMHO. Hogue has a good video showing assembly/disassembly.



How would they know if the previous owner never registered?
Here in IL, there is so much darn paperwork, I just figured some gets back to them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks everyone. I think I will give this a try before losing my pistol for 4-6 weeks.
I bought this pistol from a fellow New Yorker, gun is on record somewhere for sure.
I'm disappointed with Sig on this; you would think they would stand behind their product.
 

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I'm disappointed with Sig on this; you would think they would stand behind their product.
I am not advocating or recommending you lie to SIG about your gun being used. However, I don't feel that information is pertinent in your discussion with SIG if it is a manufacturing or design defect, which I do not know it is in your case. However, let's consider the scenario carefully. They get a call from an unfamiliar customer looking for warranty service on a used firearm in which they have no idea what the true failure is, what the root cause of the failure is nor the history of the firearm. They will not agree to cover the firearm under warranty sight unseen, basing that decision on a problem definition from an unknown person.

I'd be willing to bet, should SIG, in their repair process, determine the failure to be caused by a condition under their control, the repair, parts and shipping would be covered on their dime.

If you want a manufacturer's warranty on a product, any product, buy new. When you buy used, understand you may or may not receive warranty coverage at the discretion of the manufacturer. In my experience, SIG is much better than most in this regard. There are third party warranty underwriters for many products, you may want to look for one of these, if warranty coverage is so important. But that, like buying new, will have costs.

You don't always get what you pay for, but one thing is certain, you rarely get something of real value for nothing. And when you do, appreciate it and be thankful.

[/end rant]
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I am not advocating or recommending you lie to SIG about your gun being used. However, I don't feel that information is pertinent in your discussion with SIG if it is a manufacturing or design defect, which I do not know it is in your case. However, let's consider the scenario carefully. They get a call from an unfamiliar customer looking for warranty service on a used firearm in which they have no idea what the true failure is, what the root cause of the failure is nor the history of the firearm. They will not agree to cover the firearm under warranty sight unseen, basing that decision on a problem definition from an unknown person.

I'd be willing to bet, should SIG, in their repair process, determine the failure to be caused by a condition under their control, the repair, parts and shipping would be covered on their dime.

If you want a manufacturer's warranty on a product, any product, buy new. When you buy used, understand you may or may not receive warranty coverage at the discretion of the manufacturer. In my experience, SIG is much better than most in this regard. There are third party warranty underwriters for many products, you may want to look for one of these, if warranty coverage is so important. But that, like buying new, will have costs.

You don't always get what you pay for, but one thing is certain, you rarely get something of real value for nothing. And when you do, appreciate it and be thankful.

[/end rant]
Point taken on buying new but you know what? I had an expectation that Sigs are built well and therefore, I wasn't worried about it breaking and even needing a repair.
It would be nice if they did acknowledge the problem with my pistol is by their design but frankly, they have my credit card info, no way they will be refunding me any money. We'll see.
Truth is, Glock would be doing this repair for free.;)
 

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In no way am I trying to defend SIG. This design is suspect, IMHO, in requiring the ejector be depressed prior to installing the slide. I'm sure countless ejectors have been damaged by improper slide installed, many by owners that never bothered to read the manual. Given that history, SIG is certainly reluctant to offer warrant repair coverage until they have the opportunity to determine the cause.

As a SIG and Glock armorer, my experience is that SIG service is vastly superior to anything Glock offers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Gunnut357s nailed it. ;)
I took the pistol apart using the Hogue video (using masking tape to hold the sear in place worked like a charm). When I installed the hammer the ejector got wedged under one of the main spring "prongs". I followed the man spring down and BINGO- the main housing shifted up and jammed the ejector just as Gunnut357s said. :D
I guess Hogue makes a mainspring housing, huh? :)

I'll post some pics ASAP.
 
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