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So my local gun shop guy talks so much to everyone about how all ARs are over gassed and so just swapping the buffer spring to a red extra power spring to help waste less energy in the gun and also provide a more gentle recoil. He was also saying swapping to a heavier buffer would probably help out greatly as well. He had zero experience with tuning piston guns much less the sig.

Now I have been reading already that the tighter springs from the factory cause issues shooting many 223 rounds so Im a bit weary of swapping in more weight and a stronger spring as he is recommending. I tried searching but cant find anything here.

Has anyone swapped out springs or weights? Ill probably keep shooting 556 but I am curious how any swaps affected recoil and reliability with both rounds
 

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I've run both Spikes T2 and T3 buffers in my PM400. I don't run any under-powered ammo in it, mostly run MK262, so I just leave the T3 in it now. It feels and sounds smoother with the heavier buffers. I can't say I noticed much as far as recoil but then I don't think the 5.56 has much for recoil to start with.
 

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I run a Spike's T2 in my 516, and although I think it may be a little smoother and have less thunk and sproing (those are technical terms, btw) when the buffer cycles, I can't tell any difference in felt recoil.
 

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My stock 516 shoots whatever ammo I put in it. Recoil? It's like shooting a 22. Recoil is not an issue.
 
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So my local gun shop guy talks so much to everyone about how all ARs are over gassed and so just swapping the buffer spring to a red extra power spring to help waste less energy in the gun and also provide a more gentle recoil. He was also saying swapping to a heavier buffer would probably help out greatly as well. He had zero experience with tuning piston guns much less the sig.

Now I have been reading already that the tighter springs from the factory cause issues shooting many 223 rounds so Im a bit weary of swapping in more weight and a stronger spring as he is recommending. I tried searching but cant find anything here.

Has anyone swapped out springs or weights? Ill probably keep shooting 556 but I am curious how any swaps affected recoil and reliability with both rounds
You read about tighter springs from the factory cause issues shooting many .223 Rem rounds? Did you have the problem yourself?

If you know so little about the engineering of the buffer weights and recoil springs and have to ask an Internet forum then you should not change anything on the gun. Anything you do will negatively impact the reliability of the gun. Det. Callahan said it best "a man's got to know his limitations."

Nothing anyone here, no matter how expert they are, will make sense to you because you don't have their background knowledge and experience. You are a noob messing with the well engineered physics of the gun.

Take an armorers class or two if you want to learn about swapping recoil springs and buffer weights. Then hang out with experts for a while and soak up their knowledge.

If it ain't broke don't fix it, especially if you didn't experience the problem yourself. Enjoy shooting what the engineers designed and the factory produced. You should have zero problems shooting .223 Rem in a 516 or 556 even a new one from the box. Just use good quality factory ammo from one of the big name US manufacturers and you will be fine. After a few hundred rounds the springs will loosen up. Don't forget good quality lubrication. Thoroughly clean a new gun then lube.

If that recommendation sounds too simple that's because simplicity is the essence of genius.

5.56mm XM193 is 3270 fps muzzle velocity out of a 20" barrel and .223 Rem is 3240 fps out of a 20" barrel. That 30 fps difference is less than 1% of total muzzle velocity.

Advice on ammo from the instructors at SIG SAUER Academy is buy quality ammo made in the USA. Remember those old TV commercials for some credit card where "Peggy" was some fat hairy guy from an eastern European country? The instructors at the Academy will tell you that when your gun doesn't work with the ammo you purchased and you call the ammo manufacturer and "Peggy" answers the phone then you bought the wrong stuff.

The exception to ammo not made in the USA will be Israeli Military Industries (IMI). The stuff made in Israel has to work every time and those people are using it every day. It's also used at the Academy.

Apologies for the tough tone.
 

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Port pressure and powder burn rate is more appropriate for determining function in these carbines. I could do a detailed explanation of the topic but I feel it'd open up a Pandora's box. My best advice is to use well reviewed products such as the Vltor A5 System. This system can dramatically increase reliability and soften recoil impulse.
 
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